MaddAddam and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £18.99
  • You Save: £3.09 (16%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
MaddAddam has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by bestsellersuk
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Bumped corner.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

MaddAddam Hardcover – 29 Aug 2013

146 customer reviews

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£15.90
£1.56 £1.69
£15.90 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

MaddAddam + The Year Of The Flood + Oryx And Crake
Price For All Three: £30.28

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in MaddAddam for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing (29 Aug. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408819708
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408819708
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 3.5 x 23.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (146 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 23,356 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Margaret Atwood is the author of more than thirty books of fiction, poetry and critical essays.

In addition to the classic The Handmaid's Tale, her novels include Cat's Eye, shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in Italy, The Blind Assassin, winner of the 2000 Booker Prize and Oryx and Crake, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Her most recent novel, The Year of the Flood, was published in 2009. She was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize for Literature in 2008.

Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto, Canada.

(Photo credit: George Whitside)

Product Description

Review

Margaret Atwood also has the really fine writer's light-footed ability to keep dancing around her characters...moving, but also very funny ... MaddAddam is an extraordinary achievement (Independent on Sunday)

A haunting, restless triumph ... Deadpan wit, intellectual sizzle and sensuous immediacy - Atwood's fictional trademarks - run through the teeming inventiveness of the novel's pre-disaster episodes (Sunday Times )

This final volume deploys its author's trademark cool, omniscient satire, but adds to that a real sense of engagement with a fallen world. Atwood has created something reminiscent to Shakespeare's late comedies; her wit and dark humour combine with a compassionate tenderness towards struggling human beings ... Since almost everything in the world has been broken or has broken down, the novels' form, whirling as brilliantly as the bits of glass in a kaleidoscope, or the pixels in a complex computer game, seems simply to replicate that chaos. However, behind the apparent disorder Atwood the conjuror remains in firm control, juggling her narrative techniques with postmodern glee (Independent)

Sure to be a success (Independent on Sunday)

There are few writers able to create a world so fiercely engaging, so funny, so teeming - ironically - with life. MaddAddam is ultimately a paean to the enduring powers of myth and story, and like the sharpest futuristic visions, it's really all about the here and now (Hephzibah Anderson Daily Mail)

MaddAddam is remarkable for enacting the transition from oral to written history within a fictional universe - one complete with myths and false gods ... MaddAddam is the work of a wild, subversive writer who has looked long and hard at her craft (TLS)

If you want complete escapism this summer, Margaret Atwood fans will not be disappointed with Maddaddam (Woman's Way)

MaddAddam is an extraordinary achievement. Atwood's body of work will last precisely because she has told us about ourselves (Independent on Sunday)

Atwood has created something reminiscent to Shakespeare's late comedies; her wit and dark humour combine with a compassionate tenderness toward struggling human beings ... Atwood's story ends intensely movingly, with the damaged world potentially renewed through storytelling, through writing (Michele Roberts Independent)

A haunting, restless triumph ... A writer of virtuoso diversity, with an imagination that responds as keenly to scientific concerns as it does to the literary heritage in which she is steeped ... A dystopia over which Atwood sets swirling a glitterball of different kinds of fiction (Sunday Times)

There is much that is bleak and terrifying in Atwood's fiction, but it is leavened by her humour ... MaddAddam is remarkable for enacting the transition from oral to written history within a fictional universe - one complete with myths and false gods ... the work of a wild, subversive writer who has looked long and hard at her craft (TLS)

It may have been a decade in the making, but it has been well worth the wait ... Margaret Atwood not only completes one of the most harrowing visions of a near-future dystopia in recent fiction, but lures us even further into new zones of existential terror (John Burnside The Times)

One of the most important writers in English today (Germaine Greer)

Margaret Atwood is the quiet Mata Hari, the mysterious, violent figure ... who pits herself against the ordered, too clean world like an arsonist (Michael Ondaatje)

It's easy to appreciate the grand array of Margaret Atwood's works ... in all their power and grace and variety. When I think of it, and put it together with her writerly gifts and achievements, it takes my breath away (Alice Munro)

Atwood is a poet. Scarcely a sentence of her quick, dry yet avid prose fails to do useful work (John Updike)

She may be deadly serious but she is also seriously funny (Alan Taylor Glasgow Herald)

A trilogy set in a dystopian America some decades in the future, depicting - graphically, satirically, brilliantly - an environmental disaster (Ruth Franklin Prospect)

Not since the Cold War has the end of the world been so chic ... Just when you think you are suffering from apocalypse fatigue, along comes Margaret Atwood to wipe the floor with the limp, lame competition and inject new life into the genre ... Atwood is one of the world's finest and funniest living writers. This is a brilliantly realised, needle-sharp and imaginative novel. What more could you want? (Craig Purshouse New Humanist)

Her writing casts spells ...She is prolific (Tom Adair Scotsman)

The MaddAddam trilogy shows a master artificer inventing nothing less than a cosmogony, one shining constellation at a time (Sarah Churchwell New Statesman)

The final book in Atwood's MaddAddam sci-fi trilogy confirms her as the arch-prophet of global catastrophe ... It's exciting stuff ... The book masterfully evokes a doomed civilisation, and raises intriguing questions about the boundaries of science and the nature of religion (Anthony Gardner Mail on Sunday)

Atwood is the master of this genre and her incredible imagination continues to hold the black mirror up against the technological forces which might drive us to destruction (Stylist)

A wonderful and justly venerated novelist (Theo Tait Guardian)

A blinding piece of writing (Andrzej Lukowski Metro)

Unsettling, funny and savagely satirical (Irish Times)

Written with admirable energy and bravura (Justin Cartwright Observer)

Darkly funny ( Vogue )

Marvellously concludes the trilogy of apocalyptic near-future fables (Adam Roberts Guardian Books of the Year)

Review

'An epic dystopian journey through a wasteland of high science and low deeds that ends in hope.' (The Independent)

'The final entry in Atwood’s brilliant MaddAddam trilogy roils with spectacular and furious satire.' (Publishers Weekly)

'The final entry in Atwood’s brilliant MaddAddam trilogy roils with spectacular and furious satire … Her vision is as affirming as it is cautionary, and the conclusion of this remarkable trilogy leaves us not with a sense of despair at mankind’s failings but with a sense of awe at humanity’s barely explored potential to evolve.' (Publishers Weekly) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a big fan of Margaret Atwood. he quality of her prose, her characters, and her imagination is such that she writes some of the few realistic, contemporary tales that I'm happy to read, but I think she's at her best when she's writing full-blown science-fiction with a literary edge. While the Handmaid's Tale is probably the best known example of this, I actually prefer Oryx and Crake and its sequel, the Year of the Floor. The series presents one of the most intriguing and well-developed futuristic dystopias I've ever come across, combined with an interesting plot set both before and after the plague deliberately designed to wipe out humanity and replace it with a race of genetically modified perfect beings.

Oryx and Crake dealt with the upper-echelons of society and the scientific genius who created the plague and the new humans, while Year of the Flood told the interlocking story of the underclass and the God's Gardeners environmentalist cult. The two books worked well together to fill in each other's blanks, give various different perspectives on the world and the plot, and create a fully rounded universe. I was therefore unsure what else this third book could add.

As with the earlier books, MaddAddam presents both a linear narrative of life after the "Waterless Flood" for the handful of survivors, and flashbacks to life in the pre-plague world of genetic engineering, stark class divides and armed corporations.

The "modern-day" sections focus on Toby, who is holed up with a combination of God's Gardeners, former MaddAddam affiliates, a (mostly unconscious) Jimmy from the first book, and a large group of Crakers, the new humans, to whom she tells selective stories of the past as a sort of creation myth.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Becstar on 22 Feb. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved the first 2 books and couldn't wait for the last one to finish it all off. I was a little disappointed. I don't quite know what I expected from this book. Some sort of twist or something, but not very much really happens. It's beautifully written and takes you right back to the world created in Oryx and Crake and The Flood but I got to the end of it and just felt a bit "meh" about it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sera69 on 25 Mar. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Maddaddam is the third in Atwood's near future apocalypse series began in Oryx And Crake and continued in The Year Of The Flood. While it was remarkably enjoyable to return to Atwoods future and to catch up again with familiar characters, Maddaddam is somewhat of a let-down when compared to its predecessors and should certainly not be approached as the first read if you are new to Atwood.

So if Oryx and Crake is the masterpiece, the creation and realisation of (yet another) dystopian future and Year of the Flood essential and riveting padding exploring the surrounding characters to those in O&C, then Maddaddam is an epilogue, a brief round up of loose threads. In fact Maddaddam reads almost as prologue to a presumed far future fourth novel. Little happens, seeds are sown that makes me think revisiting this world in 100 or 500 years time would be far more enjoyable than simply continuing in almost linear fashion the story of Year Of The Flood. The stories of Zeb and Adam still leave a lot of holes. Zeb's incredible back story is skimmed over almost casually as a lovers rite of bonding rather than dramatic event. And Adam's holier than holy creation and exploitation of God's Gardeners is barely examined.

That said i did enjoy Maddaddam. Toby is an insecure but kind hearted heroine and the Crakers as confusing and innocent as always. Their rites, the Pigoons and the gradual reclamation of normality are what drive this novel rather than anything peculiarly dramatic. Both O&C and YotF had the world ending plague as dramatic impetus but Maddaddam is more insular and as such it's problems a whole lot less seismic.

An interesting but unnecessary third act.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Ang on 21 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is such a tricky book to review - as the conclusion to the two works 'Oryx and Crake' and 'The Year of the Flood' that I enjoyed tremendously, I fell right back into the post-apocalyptic world that Atwood had created quite naturally. However, it was also inevitable that some unfair comparison would be made with its predecessors.

I would not recommend reading 'MaddAddam' on its own, even though there is a helpful synopsis of the two preceding works in the introduction. The complexity of Snowman-the-Jimmy's relationship with Crake/Glenn and Oryx cannot be comprehended without reading the first book, and Jimmy's strange role as the guardian of the Crakers would puzzle most readers.

While 'The Year of the Flood' was billed as a "simultaneoul" (or simultaneous sequel) to the first book, since the events of both books happened simultaneously and converged at the end of both books, 'MaddAddam' picks up from the pivotal ending and continues the story, focusing on Toby and Zeb, together with the ragamuffin group of bedraggled survivors the MaddAdamites, who try to form an uneasy commune with the posthumans, the Crakers. When the Crakers were introduced to us in 'Oryx and Crake', the peculiarity of their bio-enhanced traits (like insect-repellent skin, unproblematic mating rituals, and docile personalities, etc) might have enthralled the readers, but in this last book, their ineffective purring over physical injuries and relentless need to have the tales of Oryx and Crake told to them while constantly interrupting with their singing and questions, lose their charm for this reader, and becomes jarring, as Atwood, perhaps with self-conscious awareness, inserts as humorous asides in Toby's tales.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback