Minority Report and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£9.74
  • RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £1.25 (11%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
MINORITY REPORT (Sent to ... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

MINORITY REPORT (Sent to Save) Paperback – 1 Jan 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.74
£5.07 £5.12
£9.74 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

MINORITY REPORT (Sent to Save) + Reformation: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow + The Creedal Imperative
Price For All Three: £25.46

Buy the selected items together



Trade In this Item for up to £0.25
Trade in MINORITY REPORT (Sent to Save) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Christian Focus Publications (1 Jan 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845503171
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845503178
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 13.3 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,241,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. J. Weeks on 8 Jun 2008
Format: Paperback
Trueman is to church history what Fred was to fast bowling. He is the best for enjoyment and he sends down some bouncers too. Carl is a great read. he is a challengingly intellectual historian and theologian. He will make you think, provoke you and make you laugh. Part one of this book is the longer more formal papers. This is not the easiest of starts but keep going. the fun is part two. Yes, Carl can make history fun. He is the best historian I have read for linking the past to the present. I think he has convinced me that I too am a Zen Calvinist and like him I recommend the Psalter. All human life is there. Read this book. be challenged and smile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Hosier on 17 April 2012
Format: Paperback
Now, this guy I like.

I read and enjoy Trueman's posts on the Reformation 21 blog, so when I saw this in my local bookstore it was a no-brainer to buy it. The book comprises a collection of Trueman's blog posts, but begins with four longer essays. In the introduction Trueman describes his book as "without a theme and with no obvious market" but were I the publisher I would have printed the longer essays at the end of the book, as they could be somewhat off-putting to the general reader. So my advice would be to buy the book, but start reading it half-way through.

Despite Trueman's claim to be writing without a theme, there are consistent themes that run through the chapters. Trueman is professor of historical theology and church history at Westminster Theological Seminary (as well as being editor of Themelios) and in his writing seeks to help the reader ask questions of current cultural and theological givens against the backdrop of church history. For example, he is consistently critical of an evangelicalism which no longer means very much:

"What is evangelicalism? It is a title I myself identify with on occasion, especially when marking myself off from liberalism, another ill-defined, amorphous, transdenominational concept.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Sharp words from a sharp mind 17 April 2012
By Matthew Hosier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Now, this guy I like.

I read and enjoy Trueman's posts on the Reformation 21 blog, so when I saw this in my local bookstore it was a no-brainer to buy it. The book comprises a collection of Trueman's blog posts, but begins with four longer essays. In the introduction Trueman describes his book as "without a theme and with no obvious market" but were I the publisher I would have printed the longer essays at the end of the book, as they could be somewhat off-putting to the general reader. So my advice would be to buy the book, but start reading it half-way through.

Despite Trueman's claim to be writing without a theme, there are consistent themes that run through the chapters. Trueman is professor of historical theology and church history at Westminster Theological Seminary (as well as being editor of Themelios) and in his writing seeks to help the reader ask questions of current cultural and theological givens against the backdrop of church history. For example, he is consistently critical of an evangelicalism which no longer means very much:

"What is evangelicalism? It is a title I myself identify with on occasion, especially when marking myself off from liberalism, another ill-defined, amorphous, transdenominational concept. But in a world where there are "evangelicals" who deny justification by faith as understood by the Protestant Reformers, who deny God's comprehensive knowledge of the future, who deny penal substitutionary atonement, who deny the Messianic self-consciousness of Christ, who have problems with the Nicene Creed, who deny the Chalcedonian definition of Christ's person, who cannot be trusted to make clear statements on homosexuality, and who advocate epistemologies and other philosophical viewpoints which are entirely unprecedented in the history of the orthodox Christian church, it is clear that the term "evangelical" and its cognates, without any qualifying adjective, such as "confessional" or "open" or "post-conservative," is in danger of becoming next to meaningless."

Although resident in America, Trueman is a Brit, and brings a very British, somewhat sarcastic, sense of humour to his writing. Which is probably why I enjoy reading him so much. Here is a good example:

"One of the questions I have been asked with some frequency... is why my contributions... tend to have something of a facetious edge to them. I am tempted to answer simply that that is the kind of person I am. If you want a bland blog, there are plenty of options out there, but, as Mariah Carey doesn't do stairs, I try my best not to do bland. Whether I'm successful or not is unclear, though the amount of hate mail is encouraging in this regard: please keep sending it in; it means a lot to me and, judging by the adjectives alone, I know it means a lot to you too."

That really made me laugh! In fact, Trueman writes in a way I like to think I would, if only my IQ score were several points higher. He is phenomenally well read and sharp and brings a surgeons scalpel as well as a demolition hammer to the issues he discusses. It's a long time since I've added quite so many squiggles in the margin to a book - pretty much everything seems worthy of underlining. There is so much here that I would like to quote that this review would just become a slightly shorter version of the book. But if you are brave enough, and sometimes enjoy the bracing slap of provocative theological insight across the flabby cheek of contemporary evangelicalism this is a book to read yourself. For brilliant insights into why the Calvinist doctrine of total depravity is so important; and into Ted Haggard's fall from grace; and into our cultures obsession with youth, this is a book to chew on.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fun-filled Trip on Truth 17 Mar 2010
By Mike Robinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Carl Trueman (a contributor to the "Dictionary of Historical Theology" & "The Cambridge Companion to Reformation Theology") didn't join the carnival; he became a writer of theology. Not much difference some say. In this chuckle-filled book Trueman delivers sideshows, strongmen, and games; complete with epistemic freaks, dimwits, featherheads, and irrational oddballs in this big-tent volume loaded with entertaining theological orthodox essays. Trueman's previous work was so unique and funny that it lead to this subsequent compilation of more humorous essays.

You will learn and you will roll when the author discusses:
- Romance based fiction
- Eichman
- Beckwith
- American Idol
- Modern tech devices
- Fuzzy ferrets
- Nietzsche
- Augustine.

A very distinct and breezy book that helps make theology interesting and engaging.
There Are Moral Absolutes: How to Be Absolutely Sure That Christianity Alone Supplies
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Thought-provoking theology 5 July 2010
By John Dekker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book has several shorter pieces from his Wages of Spin column on the reformation21 website, as well as four longer pieces. Two themes emerge from his writing. The first is the necessity of studying (and understanding!) church history. Not all that surprising, really, given that Trueman is Professor of Historical Theology and Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary. The second theme is a bit more surprising: he critiques the "mere Christianity" popular in modern evangelical circles, which thrives at the expense of a robust confessional orthodoxy. Trueman's perspective comes out most clearly in his review of Is the Reformation Over? by Mark Noll and Carolyn Nystrom. Thought-provoking stuff.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback