Lydia Cassat Reading the Morning Paper: A Novel and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by goldstone_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by any notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged. All orders are dispatched within 1 working day from our UK warehouse. Established in 2004, we are dedicated to recycling unwanted books on behalf of a number of UK charities who benefit from added revenue through the sale of their books plus huge savings in waste disposal. No quibble refund if not completely satisfied.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper Hardcover – 6 Feb 2003


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£2.76 £0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Century; New edition edition (6 Feb. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712623639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712623636
  • Product Dimensions: 18 x 12.7 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,036,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

‘Lovely. Chessman beautifully captures the rich relationship between model and painter and between sisters’ -- Tracy Chevalier

From the Publisher

An unforgettable novel in the bestselling tradition of Girl with a Pearl Earring --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"Could you model for me tomorrow, Lyd?" Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 April 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was a delight to read and a delight to look at. The story of two sisters told through five pictures painted by artist Mary Cassatt of Lydia, who is terminally ill. Sounds morbid? It isn't. It is tender, beatifully written, and ultimately life-affirming. It offers many insights into the art world of Degas' Paris, and into the mind of a comparatively unknown artist, (unjustly so), who deserves to be ranked with almost any of the Impressionists. And the real treat was the superb production, the style, and the illustrations - it is quite the prettiest book I have seen in a very long while, and would make a splendid gift for someone special, or for yourself. The only drawback? You'll finish it at a sitting, I guarantee. But still, I for one can't wait to read it again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "danielagalante" on 6 May 2003
Format: Hardcover
An exceptional introspective masterpiece about the relationship between the two sisters Mary and Lydia Cassatt, the painter and the model. A collection of thoughts and sensations in short sketches, each one dealing with a paint. A vivid stream of consciousness narration, meant to evocate and not to describe, the novel focuses on the different personalities of Lydia herself, Mary and her pigmalion Degas, whose character appears and disappears in the flow of the events as light in the impressionist paintings. Finally the main theme of this novel seems to be the sometimes dangerous relationship between art and life, illness and vitality. The evocating power of the writer - deeply indebted to Virginia Woolf's best pages - reproduces in words the atmosphere of the impressionist masterpieces. An unforgettable novel of feelings, such as Tracy Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "danielagalante" on 6 May 2003
Format: Hardcover
An exceptional introspective masterpiece about the relationship between the two sisters Mary and Lydia Cassatt, the painter and the model. A collection of thoughts and sensations in short sketches, each one dealing with a paint. A vivid stream of consciousness narration, meant to evocate and not to describe, the novel focuses on the different personalities of Lydia herself, Mary and her pigmalion Degas, whose character appears and disappears in the flow of the events as light in the impressionist paintings. Finally the main theme of this novel seems to be the sometimes dangerous relationship between art and life, illness and vitality. The evocating power of the writer - deeply indebted to Virginia Woolf's best pages - reproduces in words the atmosphere of the impressionist masterpieces. An unforgettable novel of feelings, such as Tracy Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 36 reviews
38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
PITCH PERFECT PROSE CELEBRATES FAMILY, LOVE, AND ART 28 Jan. 2002
By Gail Cooke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Art and life. Life and art. The lines pf demarcation aren't' visible in this richly imagined story of the relationship between Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt (1847 - 1926) and her older sister, Lydia, who sometimes served as Cassatt's model. Using five of the artist's paintings as springboards the author offers a moving story of courage and creativity, while she renders a fascinating study of the times in which the women lived.
Although suffering painfully, from a terminal illness, Bright's disease, Lydia continues to model for her sister, relentlessly scanning each finished portrait as if it foretold her future. Chessman conceives of Lydia as a study in patience and resignation, imagining that painter Edgar Degas, who often visited the sittings, said to Lydia, "You show me how to live, if only I could do it as you do."
In addition to exploring a unique sibling bond "Lydia Cassatt Reading The Morning Paper" suggests aspects of Cassatt's daring life, hints at a liaison with the dynamic Edgar Degas, and presents thumbnail sketches of her interaction with such artists as Renoir and Caillebotte.
Lydia, we learn, died in 1882 while Cassatt lived to create for over thirty more years.
Rather than a sad reflection on a too short life, Chessman, with pitch-perfect prose, has penned a celebration of family, love, and art.
- Gail Cooke
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Lyrical Tale of Sisterly Love 11 Sept. 2002
By E. Rothstein - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was a huge fan of Tracy Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring", so I was most interested to read Harriet Chessman's novel about Mary Cassatt and her sister Lydia - the inspiration for many of her impressionist paintings. Chessman's style is elegant, and spare, and she limns a portrait as lovingly as Cassatt painted Lydia. If I have any criticism, it's that I wished the novel had a broader scope - it covers a very brief period when Cassatt and her family lived in Paris. I wanted to know more about the family before they came to Europe, and how at that time in history a woman was able to rise to such prominence in the epicenter of the birth of modern art. Chessman is an accomplished writer, and yet the book is not as deeply felt as it could be, perhaps because of its brevity. Still, it is a tale well worth the telling, and a pleasure to read.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Lyrical and Contemplative 26 Feb. 2002
By Laure-Madeleine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Lydia Cassatt (1837-82) was the older sister of the avant-garde American-born Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). This lovely novella, 'Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper' by Harriet Scott Chessman, is set in Paris and its environs in the late 1870s to early 1880s and recreates a fictional portrayal of their life en famille and with close friends like Edgar Dégas, the French Impressionist. Because it was the time of the Impressionist exhibitions in Paris, there are mentions of other artists such as Gustave Caillebotte, Claude Monet, Pierre Auguste Renoir, and Berthe Morisot. Lydia often posed for Mary, which she found to be 'a form of enchantment.' Afflicted with Bright's disease, a fatal disease of the kidneys, Lydia endured much pain and weakness to sit still while her sister painted her. Through the use of internal monologue in a stream-of-consciousness Impressionistic style, Ms. Chessman allows the reader to experience the passing thoughts, memories, and reflections of Lydia. Lydia had remained an unmarried woman because her fiancé had been killed in the Civil War. Mary (called May) was also unmarried, through choice, because she did not wish to compromise her artistic career with marriage and motherhood.
Included in the pages of this novella are five beautiful color plates of paintings of Lydia by Mary Cassatt. Each of the five short chapters contains almost a meditation on each painting. Through the imaginative writing of Ms. Chessman, I learned more about the details of Cassatt's paintings, such as the possible meaning of a scarlet sash in 'Lydia Crocheting in the Garden at Marly' (1880); that there was a pair of Mary's burgundy leather gloves resting on the loom in 'Lydia Seated at a Tapestry Frame' (1880/81); and that the little girl in 'Woman and Child Driving' (1879) was Edgar Dégas's niece. Mary painted the cover portrait of Lydia, 'Woman Reading,' in 1878/79, and the novella gave me a glimpse of what Lydia might have been thinking and feeling while she posed for it. Lydia's preference was to read poetry by Tennyson rather than the Le Journal newspaper that she is holding in this portrait. Mary Cassatt's portraits of Lydia look unposed, so I was somewhat surprised to read about the sessions where the silently suffering Lydia had posed for hours.
This novella has inspired me to view Mary Cassatt's work with a fresh eye. Now looking at the vivacious décolletage portrait of 'Lydia in a Loge, Wearing a Pearl Necklace' (1879), which is not discussed in this book, I might imagine her enjoying a rare night out at the opera, possibly in a happier mood. Lydia was model and muse for Mary, and 'Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper' shows a contemplative reflection of the artist's gaze.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Best book I've read all year---and I read a lot! 28 Oct. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This compassionate, beautifully written tale celebrates life, death, art, poetry, and sisterhood. It lacks the bitterness of Girl with a Pearl Earring, which I didn't care for at all. You will never look at these paintings in the same way again. It also reminded me of the beauty of what my own sister left behind. Many thanks to the author for such a compelling book.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A gem of a book 5 Dec. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
At first glance, I read this book hoping for insight into the life of the painter Mary Cassatt. But the book's truest strength lies in its observations on death and life, and art's role in it. A quiet, understated and beautifully written book. For other books on a similar theme, try Girl in Hyacinth blue by Susan Vreeland (about a painting presumed to be a Vermeer) and Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chavalier, also about Vermeer.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback