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  • Lust For Life [DVD] [1956]
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Lust For Life [DVD] [1956]

46 customer reviews

Price: £34.99
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Product details

  • Actors: Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn, James Donald, Pamela Brown, Everett Sloane
  • Directors: Vincente Minnelli
  • Producers: John Houseman
  • Format: PAL, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Dutch, English, French, Italian, Arabic, Romanian, Bulgarian
  • Dubbed: French, Italian
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English, Italian
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 20 Mar. 2006
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000CQ97PG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 45,265 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Kirk Douglas stars as the Impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh in Vincente Minnelli's biopic. After giving away not only his own belongings but those of the church to impoverished Belgian miners, Van Gogh is reprimanded by his religious superiors. He turns to a life of squalor, but is saved by his brother, Theo. Van Gogh then develops a passion for painting, using a prostitute as his model. After alienating his patron and relative, Anton Mauve, Van Gogh moves to Paris, developing a close friendship with Gauguin. Anthony Quinn won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his portrayal of Gauguin.

Synopsis

Lust for Life captures the ecstasy of art, and the agony of one man's life. Kirk Douglas gives a fierce portrayal of Van Gogh, an artist torn between the joyous inspiration of his genius and the dark desperation of his tormented mind.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By websurfer on 22 April 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In 1956 Director Vincent Minnelli took in his hands the first film biopic of the famous impressionist painter Vincent Van Gog.Adapted from the Irwin Stone novel it was MGM's prestigue film of the year gathering several Oscar nominations.
The task of bringuing to the screen the passionate and dramatic life of a true revolutionary artist couldn't be easy but Minnelli did a wonderful job recreating the life and times of Van Gog. Lust for Life is undoubtly a 1950ths classic with a brilliant cinemathography by Freddy Young, great score by Miklos Rosza, beautiful Art Direction by Cedric Gibbons and of course wonderful acting by Kirk Douglas as Van Gog and Anthony Quinn as Paul Gauguin(winner of the Oscar for best suporting actor of 1956)! This being said its just a shame that such a wonderful film didn't guet the Special Edition treatment! Even so....buy it!!!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Alejandra Vernon on 2 Jun. 2004
With an uncanny resemblance to the self-portraits of Vincent Van Gogh, Kirk Douglas is perfect for this detailed and wonderful production of the artist's life; it's a passionate performance of a troubled soul, whose creative urges battled with his mental illness.
The film has an intelligent script by Norman Corwin, based on Irving Stone's biographical novel. It picks up the story around 1879, when Van Gogh was 26 years old, and went to minister (unsuccessfully) to the coal miners of a destitute area, and from there takes us through his many different abodes, his relationship with "Christine", who is well played by Pamela Brown, and the flourishing of his art in his last 15 years of life.
The art direction is superb, and the recreations of the places Van Gogh painted a marvel, among them the famous yellow house he lived in and its bedroom, and my favorite, the pool hall, with its hanging lamps.
The cinematography by Freddy Young and Russell Harlan is terrific, and we get many full screen views of the original paintings, many of them lesser known pieces from private collections.
This was a multi-award winning film, and garnered an Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Anthony Quinn, who is fabulous as Paul Gauguin, whose personality was the complete opposite of his friend Van Gogh; the ego clashes when they attempted to live together are well illustrated in several scenes, and with a little addition to his nose, Quinn has been made to look exactly like Gauguin's famous self-portrait with the snake.
James Donald is excellent as Vincent's patient and generous brother, who was Van Gogh's central means of support for most of his lifetime, both financially and of his paintings.
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Mar. 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I have been waiting years for this to come out on DVD and at long last it is being released. Two things that I love about this film. Firstly the real paintings were used (not prints) throughout most of the film. They are beautifully shot closeup. Secondly the music score by Miklos Rozsa is sublime. When the paintings and music are combined, well words cannot do justice.
There are a number of scenes where a shot seques from Van Gogh actually painting one of his masterpieces to the painting itself. Again this is marvellous stuff.
Naturally the acting is good, Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn spark well off each other and rest of the cast are all good.
But I have to come back to the paintings and the music...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 10 July 2015
Format: DVD
Lust For Life is not the last word on Vincent Van Gogh, but it does have a lot going for it. The script takes a lot from his letters to his brother Theo, and many paintings were photographed and interspersed full-screen with the drama, so that it is rooted in his work. It has excellent performances, particularly from Kirk Douglas, who bears an uncanny likeness to the painter. It also has quite a prominent soundtrack, as Hollywood films of the period did. You can see shades of An American in Paris in Minnelli's procedure, but on the whole he adapts his slightly sugar-candied style to suit the tougher material. The first half of the film shows Van Gogh before the paintings which have made his reputation, working as a lay preacher in a mining village in Holland. He had strained relations with his family, didn't make a success of the community work, and had two disastrous romantic entanglements, which showed him to be both ardent and somewhat innocent. These qualities set him at variance later with the worldly, surly Gauguin, who came to live with him in Arles once he was established there. Gauguin does not emerge as a likeable character, being both arrogant and critical of the vulnerable Van Gogh. Their very tense relationship, which almost amounted to a kind of passion even as shown in a Fifties Hollywood drama like this, pushed Van Gogh over the edge and he severed his ear, prompting Gauguin to leave. After that his mental health was very precarious, and he was either in a sanatorium near Arles or in the North under a doctor's supervision until his death more or less by suicide.

The film shows his passion and love of paint very well; it also suggests what a kind man he was, making his loneliness hard to believe, in a way. You imagine he must have been more intractable than he appears here.
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