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Lucky Kunst: The Rise and Fall of Young British Art Paperback – 25 Jan 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Aurum Press Ltd (25 Jan 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845135288
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845135287
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 490,741 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'a picaresque, hilarious story never before told.'
-- Arts Council, July

About the Author

Gregor Muir is the Executive Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. Previously, he has been director of Hauser & Wirth (London), the contemporary art gallery, and Kramlich Curator of Contemporary Art at the Tate where he curated several exhibitions and museum displays, and was responsible for numerous acquisitions of contemporary art for Tate Collections. Muir curated YBA group shows such as 'Lucky Kunst' and 'Liar'. He has been a critic and writer for various cutting-edge publications such as Dazed & Confused, Parkett and Frieze magazine.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Gregor Muir writes vividly here of the young British art scene of the nineteen nineties and of all the colourful and bohemian goings on around it. He recounts the early "frieze" exhibition, the pairing of Damien Hirst with his agent Jay Joplin, cool Britannia, Tracey Emin's and Sarah Lucas's "shop", warehouse living in Shoreditch and of course all the boozing and partying that went along with this scene, not to mention some of the actual art itself. paints a picture of the time,- very good
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three things you need to know about gregor muir.
1. he was there. really there. not just front-of-house with a pink gin, a crumpled suit and an obscene twinkle in his eye (although he often was). he ate (to soak up the gin), slept (to sleep off the gin) and drank (the occasional gin) with everyone who was 'anyone', before they were anyone you or i had even heard of.
he stole from their fridges (probably), crashed-out face-down in their toilets (probably) and (probably) borrowed their underwear to walk home in at 6am (when the director of the ICA at the time was probably waking up to a lukewarm shower and a pop-tart). had bruce robinson not made 'withanil and i' about his friend vivian mackerrell, he'd have made it ten years later about gregor muir.
i had the great fortune to spend a long evening drinking with gregor, sarah (lucas) and angus (fairhurst, loved and forever missed) in 1996. i laughed until my cheeks hurt. the withnail comparison is the best i can make based on my personal experience of him. he is a raconteur without equal.
2. he was not then, and is not now, afraid to speak his mind and tell you (in no uncertain terms) how it is, as he sees it. and once he has told you how he sees it, you will want to see everything else as he sees it. whether how he sees it is correct or incorrect is immaterial, it is just (invariably) how it is most interestingly seen.
there is a telling cameo of gregor in the 1996 sarah lucas documentary ‘two melons and a stinking fish’. he and cerith wyn evans are discussing one of sarah’s legs-apart ‘butch’ self-portaits. gregor suggest to cerith that she is shamelessly touting for the bull-dyke vote. cerith blushes and struggles to reframe the bitingly accurate critique in ‘artspeak’ for the sake of the bbc2 camera.
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I enjoyed this book, very inspiring for artists and very informative descriptions of the British art scene. I am thankful for Amazon because art books are normally way too expensive, especially on an artist's budget!
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This is a great little book which provides a very personal insight to the British art scene known as YBA.
I have seen Gregor Muir at several occasions at the ICA and it was delightful to read about his experiences
recounted in first person.

Gregor Muir is a very inspiring man and I think all artists should read this book, because it will give you
a firm push towards the right direction.

[...]
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