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Lucky Child (P.S.) Paperback – 1 Apr 2006


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Frequently Bought Together

Lucky Child (P.S.) + After They Killed Our Father: A Refugee from the Killing Fields Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind + First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
Price For All Three: £21.67

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Product details

  • Paperback: 268 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (1 April 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060733950
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060733957
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 238,294 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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My excitement is so strong, I feel like there are bugs crawling around in my pants, making me squirm in my seat. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Ms. K. A. Sharman on 23 Jun 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have a great interest in these types of life stories especially as I have traveled through the country seeing some of the devastation and stories.
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By yellow tulip on 18 May 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lived up to expectations. Fantastic writing, makes you realise how lucky 'we' are. Helped me to put 'things' into perspective, somethings are just not worth stressing about! Look out for your own and treasure your family. Help others when possible, plus don't forget to enjoy the freedom and lifestile we are so lucky to have.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By phil on 23 Nov 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
brilliant book but beware also buying After they Killed my father by the same author thinking they are sequential. They are the same book published under different titles
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By mark casey on 15 Mar 2010
Format: Hardcover
surprised it is a hard back,a bargain at that price,i am well pleased,and am looking forward to loung ung's next book.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 53 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Engaging and gripping tale of immigrant experience 19 May 2005
By G. Griffith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Ms. Ung has once again given us a powerful rendering of what it means to survive. Her first book, First They Killed My Father" was extraordinary for its ability to translate the experience of the Cambodian genocide for a public disconnected to the realities of that war.

Her second book is no less a tour de force, giving us an eye into the life of a young girl from a radically different culture (and history of deprevation) trying to come to terms with this American life. She does it remarkably well, with candor and grace.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Not So Perfect : Loung Ung and Us 15 Aug 2005
By S. Ahlberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As I read 'Lucky Girl,' I was amazed that Loung Ung had the courage to write such an honest account of her feelings and experiences following her arrival in the USA. She paints a portrait of herself with shadings of the human faults and frailties that we all carry within us. But would we have the courage to pen the less admirable aspects of ourselves for all the world to know?

Several years ago I traveled to Phnom Penh. Reading Ms Ung's first book after the visit, I was haunted with vivid pictures of the Ung's family living such a comfortable life in the city and then being plunged into the darkness of genocide. I recalled thinking that the streets I wandered, the movie theater, the markets were places that, in my mind, had strangely witnessed the Ung's family pleasures and then the insanity of the Khmer brutality.

In 'Lucky Child' Loung Ung reminds us that although we might consider this unspeakable chapter of human history as 'over,' her family and thousands of other rural Cambodians live with the fear of landmines and the reality of vestiges of the Khmer threat every day.

Should you want to learn about these courageous people in the context of someone to be admired for amazing candor, read 'Lucky Child.'
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
In depth look at change in life 4 Feb 2006
By Kirk W. Leichner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Last year, I picked up First They Killed My Father while I was in Cambodia. I had already read Chanrithy Him's - When Broken Glass Floats. Both of these books are very powerful and must reads in the genre of the Khmer Rouge and the Cambodian genocide of 1975-1979. Lucky Child is a book that takes place in a completely different world. At the end of "First They", we see Loung heading for a new life in America and we all give a sigh of relief.

Lucky Child goes in depth into the difficulties of a minority trying to adapt to white American society. All the while, Loung has everything she experienced in Cambodia continually gnawing at her spirit - the loss of her family being the most difficult for her. As the author, she is our focus, but in Lucky Child, we also get a very good look at her older sister Chou and what life was like in Cambodia in the years following the fall of the Khmer Rouge.

This book is powerful and tough to put down. It tugs at the heartstrings and provokes deeper thought into our own lives and values. Lucky Child is one of the finer books that I have read in some time and I highly reccomend it to anyone who is interested in Cambodia, the peoples, customs and landscapes of that beautiful country, and human nature, suffering, and the will to succeed. This is a book not to be missed!
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Lucky Child 31 July 2005
By Joe E. Grant - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this book very much. I heard an interview with the author on our local NPR radio station and bought the book the next day. The discriptions of her feelings and the contrasts between her life in Vermont and her sisters in Cambodia were moving and very artfully done. This is a must read for all of us who sometimes take for granite the freedoms we enjoy and a true picture of courage and faith.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The tale of two sisters, worlds apart 30 April 2006
By AndyB - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Loung Ung's fascinating second book, Lucky Child, picks up the story that began with her first memoir, First They Killed My Father, and with both books I found it impossible to put them down once I'd begun reading. Lucky Child contrasts life for Loung as a refugee in America, with her sister Chou's life in rural Cambodia, and it's a revealing and moving comparison. Loung, with lasting feelings of guilt for those she'd left behind, found it difficult to fit in, whilst Chou, resigned to her fate, displayed the resilience and inner strength that is apparent in so many of her fellow countrymen and women.

I found two parts of this remarkable book particularly poignant, the heart-rending death of three-year-old Kung and the reunion between Chou and her brother Meng after a separation of eleven years. These passages were hard to read. Whilst the eventual meeting of Loung and Chou is an awkward affair, the tale of their brother Kim's escape from Cambodia to France is enthralling. The book tells a tale that underscores the importance of the bond between family members, the sheer strength of the human spirit and will to endure and most of all, it's a story of two sisters who have survived and flourished against all odds. Loung Ung has a special talent at storytelling. I recommend this book without hesitation.
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