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Love's Forever Changes: 2 (33 1/3) Paperback – 30 Oct 2003

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Product details

  • Paperback: 127 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Continuum (30 Oct. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826414931
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826414939
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 0.9 x 16.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 178,002 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'This former Bookforum editor openly identifies with this most apocalyptic of 60s El Lay albums, but he keeps his head in the game, fearlessly splashing around in lead Love-r Arthur Lee's disturbed psyche. He's sharp on the lyrics (maybe too sharp, given Lee's confused state) and slightly less so on the music, but he's killer on context: the album's fear, its overwhelming strangeness, its death-drive in a culture that only Lee knew was suffused with it.' --Austin American-Statesman, 10/17/04

About the Author

Andrew Hultkrans is a writer who lives in Brooklyn. He is the former editor-in-chief of Bookforum magazine.

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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jb Mills on 13 Aug. 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, if you 'love' the album as much as I do then you won't want to miss this book, which tells the story of the band and how Forever Changes was made.
BUT the writer fancies himself as a bit of a social commentator (fair enough, I suppose, as Love weren't exactly the Monkees, and reflected the often very dark side of the Summer of Love - there's that word again - in California) and sometimes his efforts to make Lee's lyrics fit his theories seem forced.
I think I'd rather have had a more factual account, with less of the highly conjectural analysis. This is more of a college textbook than an appreciation of an incredible band and an incredible album.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Siriam TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 April 2004
Format: Paperback
Love's Forever Changes is one of my all time favourites with greatproduction and music plus an elegaic and justified paranoia that wentbeautifully against the Summer of Love attitude of the time of it's issue.Also, based on numerous lists, critics and the recent acclaim for ArthurLee in touring again now he is out of prison, seem to reaffirnm I am notalone.
This book could therefore nearly 40 years on have delivered so much instripping away the myths and delivering new historical information andknowledge, such as the recording and production aspects, plus what leveland input other's beyond Arthur Lee had in the matter.
Sadly the author seems gripped by the auteur theory of writing and I fearthe book suffers inevitably and it does not make for an easy, enlighteningor enjoyable read. While clearly stating at the outset his personalidentification with Lee and his personal concerns and issues as depictedin the many of the song's lyrics, the book continually embarks oninclusion of long tracts and content that has minimal relevance ultimatelyto the topic at hand. Examples are lengthy coverage of the role ofPhrophecy in American writing and society; Gnosticism, and Weiss's play"Marat Sade", one of whose lines features in the track "The RedTelephone". This is not to say these references are irrelevant - just thatthe way they are used overwhelms what is ultimately a short book of 120pages and drown the music in so doing!
As a UK reader I would add that I was disappointed that the US basedwriter seems oblivious to the initial and ongoing impact Forever Changeshad outside the USA - while at the end there is reference to the UKParliamentary honour bestowed, the fact that much of the research he usesesp. "The Castle" fanzine is non-US, has not been picked up on.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By nicjaytee on 15 May 2013
Format: Paperback
Forever Changes is a brilliant album - it regularly features high up in lists of the best ever made for very good reason - but it's also a deeply intriguing one. Love, an excellent but shambolic LA rock band, suddenly produce something that in its complexity & depth is way ahead of anything they've done before (or were collectively or individually to do again) and which is up there with the very best that anyone else at the time was capable of. And then, within months, they just disintegrate. Was Forever Changes purely a product of Love themselves or were others driving Arthur Lee and his drug addled bandmates to these creative highs? Who actually played on the tracks? Who conceived and drove their highly innovative and stunningly effective arrangements - particularly the use of multiple acoustic guitars and sweeping string overlays? And, who brought it all together in the studio? In other words, how did this timeless musical masterpiece actually happen?

Hmm... well the answer's not here. Sure, the author adores Forever Changes and has done a great deal of research into Love and the LA scene at the time. But, a great deal of this research is used as justification for an overly articulate, at times pretentious, and highly personal interpretation of Arthur Lee's lyrics. Lee's lyrics are intriguingly mystical/obtuse but their real impact is not what they say (or may seem to say) but how their distinctly odd, brilliantly metred structures help drive the music along. And, of course, it's the music and its awesome arrangements that make this album. Problem is that there's far too little about who conceived and executed the music and how a group of musicians who were more likely to produce a complete turkey brought it all together in such a magical way.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Johnny D. Goode on 14 July 2004
Format: Paperback
I agree with the previous reviewer on some points - if you're looking for a book about the recording process and intricate details on the making of FOREVER CHANGES, look elsewhere! But this is a really fascinating book of ideas, in which the writer digs deep into Arthur Lee's mindset and influences at the time of the album's creation. In that respect, he does a very good job indeed. There's a lot of intelligent material in such a short book, and I came away from reading it with a much wider apprecation of Arthur Lee and his masterpiece. Recommended - but only if you're open-minded in your reading tastes.
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