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Love Remains Paperback – 12 Dec 2000

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Paperback, 12 Dec 2000
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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books; New edition edition (12 Dec. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1862074003
  • ISBN-13: 978-1862074002
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 651,006 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

"When the future ended, Nicholas discovered, you left London and went to New York. Even at Christmas..." The opening lines of Glen Duncan's second novel, Love Remains, announce the enigma which lures the reader into this book. What is it in Nicholas's world that has come to an end, and what does it have to do with the worldly perversity of Mickey--the woman who moves him into a Manhattan apartment--and the student love story, told in flashback, which begins a few pages into the novel: "Six years earlier Nicholas had married Chloe". The five sections of the novel--"Love", "Blood", "Continue", "Water" and "Necessities"--present a numbingly truthful, sometimes ruthless, anatomisation of love, hate and sex between the two protagonists. At times, Duncan's probing reads like reportage, an account drawn up from a distance for a reader called upon to witness whatever it is that is about to happen; at others, the writing is full of effort and exhibition: "Breasts like appalled witnesses, blonde hair a smashed aureole on the pillow".

As the two plots begin to converge, however, that effort, its careful attention to the apparently mundane conversation between Nicholas and Chloe--Sunday morning conversation over the newspaper report of the new London Ripper, for example--begins to pay off. Described as a writer who can make the "ordinary remarkable", Duncan has managed to bring the commonplace strangeness of sexuality into contact with the different extremes of sexual violence in an uneasy, but finally compelling, novel. --Vicky Lebeau

About the Author

Glen Duncan's previously acclaimed novels are I, LUCIFER; LOVE REMAINS; and HOPE. He lives in South London. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bob Grist VINE VOICE on 20 May 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the third novel I have read by Glen Duncan, and quite possibly the darkest. Nicholas is in New York, debasing himself through alcohol and the offering of himself for perverse acts, numb to all feeling as he recounts his lost life of love with Chloe. Chloe is in London, recovering from a most vilifying and traumatic episode. Duncan brings forth their pain and makes us wear it like heavy, rain drenched cloaks. I squirmed when I read this book, many times and most of them on the people-filled rush hour tubes of the London Underground. Observers probably wondered what was bringing me so much discomfort, it was this enthralling, beautifully written, rich novel that simply takes no prisoners and whilst it delights in its celebration of true love, it also revels in its deep look at true pain and horror. Not for the easily disturbed, but for the rest of us...magnificent!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 13 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the fourth Glen Duncan novel I've read. He never disappoints. This book is a psychoanalytic masterpiece, looking at the nature of love and hate, sex and love, pain and joy, disappointment and regret. Unusually, for a male writer, Duncan gets inside the heads of women and writes convincingly from their perspective. His description of Chloe's outlook, both before and after the event the book centres around, is something most women readers will identify with. The female characters in the book are undoubtedly the strongest and best drawn. The main male character is interesting, although maybe an as-yet-fully-formed version of the mesmerising male characters in I, Lucifer and Weathercock, but he didn't compel me in the same way as the women. If you're a romantic about love, this book will give you a different slant on things. If you're a realist about love, this book will be like coming home. He's the best contemporary writer I've had the pleasure of finding recently.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Feb. 2000
Format: Hardcover
I could not put this book down, when reading this book I felt as though I were part of an elite club reading other peoples thoughts and minds, real people not storybook characters. I think this book forces the reader to look inside of themselves in the dark corners and recesses of their minds, anyone who has experienced real fear, rejection or terror could see this as an understanding of their experiences. The characters in this book experience great love, hate and fear but also a seperation of themselves from the same feelings. I did not want to finish this book I read it everywhere on the train, in the garden, in bed and now feel as though I have lost some friends as the characters were displayed so realistically, as we recognise ourselves in others but maybe dont wish to realise it. Well done Glen more please!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. W. Collier on 3 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
Glen Duncan, along with David Mitchell, is one of the few current writers who create prose that must be savoured slowly. If you try to rush through one of his books, you will miss much of the pleasure of the words. In this book, as in the other books of his that I have read ("I, Lucifer", "Weathercock" and "The Death of an Ordinary Man") he reveals, or revels in, his fascination with polarities - good and evil, love and hate, birth and death. However, there is a flaw in this book, which is the middle section where Chloe begins her diary. For me it doesn't work. What's more, he makes the mistake of writing people's dialect phonetically.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a somewhat sordid story concerning the love affair of Nicholas and Chloe. Glen Duncan’s writing does not compromise terms of sex, so beware if you dislike things near to the bone. There are also scenes of graphic violence. At the same time the writing is often lyrical, transcendental and unutterably moving. Duncan is a brave man – he puts his neck on the line to tell the truth about love. His insight into love encompasses both sexes – and then some.

Nick and Chloe marry early. They are in love. Then, one night and a horrendous act of violence changes everything. Nick leaves the country and winds up in New York. He is not the perpetrator of the violence, however, though his disappearing act does have a reason connected to what has happened to Chloe. It seems that Nick’s moral failures have all come home to roost and the milieu in which he finds himself in the apartment of an American woman is one of punishment and degredation.

The majority of the novel concerns what happens to Chloe and one is left with huge admiration for the way Duncan empathises and works through the horrors of the damage done to her. Duncan doesn’t just empathise, however, he gets to the real heart of the matter. This is a shockingly brave and terrific example of how to write about love. I was mesmerised and captivated. Duncan pulls you through it by virtue of his glorious use of language. He is supremely gifted and shockingly good. I am unwilling to make this review more specific in terms of the plot because one needs to come to this book knowing nothing about it. Expectations will be met, you can trust me on that.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 April 2000
Format: Hardcover
Engrossing and unbelievably depressing meditation on the transcient nature of love, belonging and belief. of late there seems to be no-one taking any risks in British fiction, Duncan is one such writer. the tone is abyss black. The subtle beautiful shades of the start of a wonderful relationship, balanced by tortous passages of enforced masochism. It's the kind of book you spill tears and tea over late at night.The prose is spare yet seethes with frustrated anger at the randomness and amorphous nature of modern living. The plot is simple, man and woman fall in love, their relationship torn apart by an act out of their control. Yet even with such a thin premise Duncan manages to skewer emotions out of the reader, a raw talent hinted at in his debut "Hope" but fully realised here. "Love Remains" is closer in spirit to US writing, particularly AM Homes's "Music for Torching," another masterpiece of distopian relationships due in paperback in July. As british fiction becomes homogenised by the likes of de bernieres, faulks and garland, writers like Duncan become increasingly important to celebrate. One of the best british novels of the year, its nearest rival is published in June "Newton's Cradle" by Chris Paling also having the guts to play to a different beat to the staid and stagnent world of British literature.
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