FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Love to the Little Ones: ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by bookdonors
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shipped from the UK. Hardback with dust jacket which reflects used condition. Friendly customer service. We are a not-for-profit Social Enterprise trading in used books to help people, charities and the environment.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Love to the Little Ones: The Trials and Triumphs of Parents Through the Ages in Letters, Diaries, Memoirs and Essays Hardcover – 17 Sep 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.99
£0.99 £0.01
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln; 1st Edition edition (17 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0711229406
  • ISBN-13: 978-0711229402
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 2.5 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,118,186 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A celebration of parenthood. A delightful snapshot of parents through the ages; a glimpse through history of parental love and care. (Oxford Times)

A charming anthology, shot through with seriousness that makes it more than just a stocking filler. (Spectator)

About the Author

Louisa Lane Fox was co-founder of the Last Word Lunchtime Lectures. Her husband is the architectural critic and landscape designer Charles Jencks. She is a mother, stepmother and grandmother.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Nov. 2009
Format: Hardcover
What parent hasn't given advice to their children, chastised them, encouraged them, consoled them? This has been done through the ages, and undoubtedly will continue for unknown time to come. Often it may be difficult to find the right words to express your thoughts or impress the young one, which is why it's both enlightening and fun to read what comments parents have made though the ages in LOVE TO THE LITTLE ONES.

Readers will be surprised to find how much they have in common with those raising families hundred of years ago. Portions of diaries, letters, essays, and memoirs are arranged chronologically beginning with pregnancy through childhood, adolescence, and adult children. Fox has focused on British parents because, as she says, "...they seem to have had a slightly different experience of family life from other English speaking countries." Thus, one finds Thomas More's last letter to his daughter and Rudyard Kipling's letters to his son.

One of my favorite selections was found in a 1683 letter Jack Verney wrote to his wife who was expecting their third child, "Everything that the Lovingest of husbands can express to the best of wives, & love to the little ones not forgetting the kicker in the dark."

Yes, of course, there have been a multitude of changes regarding the raising of children since Verney's day, perhaps most conspicuously the amount of professional help available. Nonetheless the thoughts of parents are very much the same as they face the joys and trials found in family life.

- Gail Cooke
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ludovico Sforza TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Dec. 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I like this book, I didn't think I would, macho and all, but I did. I ordered it on spec and with a little curiosity. It's surprisingly good, full of quotes from letters diaries and papers from the last 400 years from both mum's and dad's about their children and problems concerning them.

Seems to me not a lot has changed re the worry stakes, from Queen Victoria being worried about her daughter Victoria and the imminent birth of her first child to Edmund Verney writing to his daughter in law about taking the waters in company with his son and worrying that she might not think he'd done his best to help cure him. Mind you some of the quoted passages are both startling and bizarre, see page 134 Augustus Hare, whose mother blythly agrees to let the baby go and mentions in passing that she has others if anyone else should want one!

Whilst there are little gems of insight like this throughout the book I also found that the fact that author (editor/complier) had kept the quoted passages in the original spelling helped to recreate the mood and times of the writer. You should note from the above that this is a book about children of all ages, not just babies!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Blake Paine VINE VOICE on 13 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book, a collection of letters, diaries, memoirs and essays by parents through the ages is not to be swallowed whole but rather savoured over some time.

It is entertaining, amusing, saddening and perhaps humbling to parents and grandparents and even to those yet to become parents - though it is possible that adolescents may find their rebellions and peccadillos are not so new after all.

I enjoyed it and I think others will find they do too.

Recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mad Saint Uden VINE VOICE on 31 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really didn't enjoy this as much as other reviewers or as much as I'd thought I would.

Firstly the introduction - five pages, was too much. It quoted many of the later quotes which the authour has picked as I guess her favourites out of a book of her favourite quotes.

Then throughout the book each and every quote is preceeded by an explination. I found this quite irritating as they often 'spoilt' or 'gave away' the point of the quote. Such things as a quote about a still birth, death of the monther, would be introduced as 'a letter written by...' '...is the wife, the baby has died'. She tells you if the quote is funny, sad, etc. All told this leaves little to explore and a book that is twice the size it needs to be.

I was very disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Adam VINE VOICE on 30 Oct. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This anthology is a collection of writing on the experience of parenting of largely British families, chosen with this focus because, as Louisa Lane Fox says in her introduction, the British seem to have a unique perspective on family life. And, any work of this type is bound to be largely influenced by the culture and background of the reader and selector of these pieces of writing.
The writings are largely letters and excerpts of letters, with some excerpts of memoirs and journal entries. They date from the 15th Century and are arranged chronologically. The anthology is arranged into sections dealing with pregnancy and birth, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death.
The compiler states that her intention is to show the universality of the parenting experience through the ages, that there are startling differences which the anthology brings out, such as the greater past experience of infant mortality, but otherwise some differences are not as great as we may think. Fears about `letting go' of adolescents and adults, of the frustrations of expectations thwarted, of rebellions by children determined to make their own way, are all here. And in this the book does succeed in showing the constant themes of parenthood as well as the serious differences and outlooks of the different periods that can make us gasp.
It's a rich and varied read, with each piece of writing introduced by the briefest description of time and place and maybe a very short observation or comment by the compiler. There are monsters and extreme situations, such as abusive nannies, hostile and destructive parents (and sometimes children), but in the main the anthology rings out with the heroism of the everyday that parenting brings out, the sacrifices of parents and the binding mutual love of families.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback