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Love Comes Later
 
 

Love Comes Later [Kindle Edition]

Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

"...a deliciously tangled plot and insight into life on the Persian Gulf."
Kirkus Review

When newlywed Abdulla loses his wife and unborn child in a car accident,
the world seems to crumble beneath his feet. Thrust back into living in
the family compound, he goes through the motions--work, eat, sleep,
repeat. Blaming himself for their deaths, he decides to never marry
again but knows that culturally, this is not an option. Three years
later, he's faced with an arranged marriage to his cousin Hind, whom he
hasn't seen in years. Hard-pressed to find a way out, he consents to a
yearlong engagement and tries to find a way to end it. What he doesn't
count on, and is unaware of, is Hind's own reluctance to marry.

Longing
for independence, she insists on being allowed to complete a master's
degree in England, a condition Abdulla readily accepts. When she finds
an unlikely friend in Indian-American Sangita, she starts down a path
that will ultimately place her future in jeopardy.

The greatest success
of Rajakumar's novel is the emotional journey the reader takes via her
rich characters. One cannot help but feel the pressure of the culturally
mandated marriage set before Hind and Abdulla. He's not a real Muslim
man if he remains single, and she will never be allowed freedoms without
the bondage of a potentially loveless marriage. It's an impossible
situation dictated by a culture that they still deeply respect.

Rajakumar pulls back the veil on life in Qatar to reveal a glimpse of Muslim life rarely seen by Westerners.

About the Author

Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar is a South Asian American who has lived in Qatar since 2005. She has since published eight eBooks including a mom-ior for first time mothers, Mommy But Still Me, a guide for aspiring writers, So You Want to Sell a Million Copies, a short story collection, Coloured and Other Stories, and a novel about women’s friendships, Saving Peace. Her recent books have focused on various aspects of life in Qatar and won several awards. From Dunes to Dior, named as a Best Indie book in 2013, is a collection of essays related to her experiences as a female South Asian American living in the Arabian Gulf. Love Comes Later is a literary romance set in Qatar and London; the novel was the winner of the Best Indie Book Award for Romance in 2013, a Finalist in the eFestival of Words, Best Novel category, and short listed for the New Talent Award for by the Festival of Romance 2012. Her third novel, The Dohmestics is an inside look into compound life, the day to day dynamics between housemaids and their employers. After she joined the e-book revolution, Mohana dreams in plotlines. Learn more about her work on her website at www.mohanalakshmi.com or follow her latest on Twitter: @moha_doha

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1699 KB
  • Print Length: 264 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008I4JJES
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #162,743 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar is a writer who has lived in Qatar since 2005. She has a PhD from the University of Florida with a focus on gender and postcolonial theory. Her dissertation project was published as Haram in the Harem (Peter Lang, 2009) a literary analysis of the works of three Muslim women authors in India, Algeria, and Pakistan. She is the creator and co-editor of five books in the Qatar Narratives series, as well as the Qatari Voices anthology which features essays by Qataris on modern life in Doha (Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Publishing, 2010). Her research has been published in numerous journals and anthologies.

She was the Associate Editor of Vox, a fashion and lifestyle magazine based in Doha and a winner of the She Writes We Love New Novelists competition. She has been a regular contributor for Variety Arabia, AudioFile Magazine, Explore Qatar, Woman Today, The Woman, Writers and Artists Yearbook, QatarClick, Expat Arrivals, Speak Without Interruption and Qatar Explorer. She hosted two seasons of the Cover to Cover book show on Qatar Foundation Radio.

Currently Mohana is working on a collection of essays related to her experiences as a female South Asian American living in the Arabian Gulf and a novel based in Qatar. She believes words can help us understand ourselves and others. Catch up on her latest via her blog or follow her on Twitter @moha_doha.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
I was given a review copy of the novel by the author and asked to provide an independent review.
Reading this on Kindle, for the first 20% of the book, I kind of liked it, but it wasn't holding my attention. But, wow, as soon as I got to 20%, I sprinted through this book and could not put it down. I've never been to Qatar, the nearest I managed was Bahrain, but I love reading and learning about other cultures. There were plenty of twists to keep me enthralled and I couldn't have foreseen the ending.
On the surface, this is a book about arranged marriages, but it goes so much deeper than that. With a great deal of it set in the UK, where the girls are students, it was a lot easier for me to visualise the scenes and attitudes of others.
I could clearly see the girls' apartment, feel the chemistry between certain individuals, understand the frustration of each of the main characters.
Duty, what is honourable, permitted and frowned upon were key elements throughout the novel and in particular women's place in Qatari society.
I loved how the girls rebelled and the presence of an Indian girl, with a similar, but not identical, background, only added to the intrigue. I also felt I learned a lot about both cultures.
The tragedy at the beginning of the book, the loyalty of the younger sister and some of the outrageous events later (culturally) only added to my enjoyment.
All in all, a novel worth reading, particularly if you like to learn about new cultures or if you have ever been fascinated by what goes on behind the scenes with regards to arranged marriages.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Addictive Reading 12 Sep 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
As a Mum, I don't get a lot of time to read and can takes months to get through a single book. Love Comes Later was impossible to put down. I read it while cooking, bathing the kids, any moment I could spare; The only disappointment I had was turning the last page!

Other than being an enjoyable read, it also gave me unexpected insights into traditional Qatari life, and gave me an excuse to ask questions of the few Muslim women I know to dig that little bit deeper than I might otherwise have done. I'd highly recommend it to anyone wanting to get a better understanding of Qatari culture.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love a sequel now 20 Aug 2012
By DohaSu
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
So a disclaimer. I've attended a writing workshop and Mohana was the facilitator and she was very inspiring. Also, I divide my time between Doha and London.

This novel is a rare glimpse into a hidden world and like any voyeur I lapped it up. It was heartening to see Abdulla portrayed as such a real person instead of an exotic other. I feel that sometimes the thobe and the abaya act as walls but they are not insurmountable. Abdulla's guilt is palpable.

I enjoyed the build up of the romance, the lure of forbidden fruits and the futile though fervent resistance. Real events such as the Olympics and the Villagio tragedy injected such an immediacy that drew me deep into Hind and Sangita's world. So much so that I was late for a meeting. I love the triumphal message of love conquers but not without sacrifice of self and family loyalties. Additionally, it shows that despite our differences we are more alike than different.

Since, I read the novel in 2 sittings, I'm sure I missed many subtleties. What a reason to cosy up again with Abdulla and friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Observed 15 Aug 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Love Comes Later is a beautifully precise and observed examination in fictional format of the 'arranged marriage' in the Arab culture of Qatar. Although there is no 'force' involved, a great deal of family pressure is brought to bear on young men and women whatever their level of education and status in the community. The story weaves a plot that splits the action between Doha and London, providing a fascinating contrast between the different cultural mores. With central characters who are Qatari Muslim and Indian Hindu, the scene is set to explore culture in a way I have certainly never considered.

I read this in one sitting because I was captivated by the story, my own cultural prejudices were being challenged and as a result my own perspective has shifted significantly. Many people unfamiliar with the cultural background of Qatar will be amazed at the similarities as much as the differences and I suspect, that many people living life in this Gulf State will simply nod in agreement as they recognise aspects of themselves and others in the characters Mohanalakshmi describes.

This is a tale of many contraditictions, those between love, and family responsiblity, cultural acceptance and prejudicial bigotry, betrayal and forgiveness. I thoroughly enjoyed it and suspect that this will be a book I will return to time and again as there will be nuances that I missed the first time round.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
No matter what I say about this novel, I can't do it enough justice in this book review, but I'll try. One of its best assets is that it's fast paced and every scene has a purpose, which is something I can't say about many novels these days. I don't like calling novels "unputdownable" because even the best novels are dense sometimes. Thankfully, that isn't the case with "Love Comes Later". The novel is truly a page turner, in part due to the great characterization as well as the themes it tackles. Among other things, "Love Comes Later" is about love, happiness, freedom, and indecision. The novel is set in Qatar and London.

Hind and Abdulla are cousins who get engaged after the passing of Abdulla's wife, but neither of them wants to get married. Hind feels like she has no control over her life, and has a taste of freedom when she leaves to London for a year to complete her master's degree. Abdulla also feels suffocated by social pressures and eventually rebels against his society to prove to both himself and his family that he can. Hind befriends a South-Asian American woman at university and they realize that their societies have a lot in common. Their friendship is tested when Abdulla travels to London. The novel is very dramatic and adventurous, and you can't help but root for the characters' happiness.

The novel stays true to the culture in many respects, and foreigners who read this will have the opportunity to discover a new culture, while people who live in Qatar will probably nod and smile in amazement when they recognize aspects of Qatari culture. Obviously, the book isn't representative of all sects of the society, but many details ring true.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars great, entertaining book
So enjoyable, specially for people living in the gulf, knowing the culture, the country and the sense of each sentence
Published 14 days ago by valepiloto
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting.
This was quite enjoyable book which gave a really good insight into arranged marriages. It took a while to figure who the people were and how they were connected but when I got... Read more
Published 6 months ago by MrsJ M. Hardman
5.0 out of 5 stars Modern Verses Traditional Values
Love Comes Later is a highly intelligent book with expertly drawn characters, emotional scenes and sparkling dialogue. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Ken Brimhall
4.0 out of 5 stars I hope the author is writing a sequel
Neither Abdulla nor Hind feel particularly positive about their impending marriage, and both welcome the temporary reprieve granted by Hind's year of study in London. Read more
Published 17 months ago by Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read
Two opposing cultures come together and made for a great read, liked the characters.
Would read another book from this author.
Published 17 months ago by JM
4.0 out of 5 stars love comes later
This is a fascinating story of romance involving a clash of cultures. An ancient battle between traditional values and the heart. Read more
Published 18 months ago by jodie
5.0 out of 5 stars Great love story!
My review:

Love Comes Later by Mohana Rajakumar awed me. It was a fascinating page turner, smoothly written and I could not put it down before the last page was turned. Read more
Published 23 months ago by IngaKS
5.0 out of 5 stars An Unforgettable Read
'Love Comes Later' is one of those beautiful reads that springs itself on an unsuspecting reader unawares, with its incredible poignancy and depth of feeling and character. Read more
Published on 25 July 2012 by L
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