• RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £2.70 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Louise de la Vallière (Ox... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Louise de la Vallière (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 29 Jan 2009

4.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.29
£3.64 £1.41
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£6.29 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Louise de la Vallière (Oxford World's Classics)
  • +
  • The Vicomte de Bragelonne (Oxford World's Classics)
  • +
  • The Man in the Iron Mask (Wordsworth Classics)
Total price: £15.27
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (29 Jan. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019953845X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199538454
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 3.6 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 268,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alexandre Dumas was born in 1802 at Villers-Cotterêts. His father, the illegitimate son of a marquis, was a general in the Revolutionary armies, but died when Dumas was only four. He was brought up in straitened circumstances and received very little education. He joined the household of the future king, Louis-Philippe, and began reading voraciously. Later he entered the cénacle of Charles Nodier and started writing.

In 1829 the production of his play, Henri III et sa Cour, heralded twenty years of successful playwriting. In 1839 he turned his attention to writing historical novels, often using collaborators such as Auguste Maquet to suggest plots or historical background. His most successful novels are The Count of Monte Cristo, which appeared during 1844-5, and The Three Musketeers, published in 1844. Other novels deal with the wars of religion and the Revolution. Dumas wrote many of these for the newspapers, often in daily instalments, marshalling his formidable energies to produce ever more in order to pay off his debts. In addition, he wrote travel books, children's stories and his Mémoires which describe most amusingly his early life, his entry into Parisian literary circles and the 1830 Revolution. He died in 1870.

Product Description

Review

one of the very best of the series, mixing amorous and political intrigue with an élan peculiar to Dumas ... this quasi-historical series remains remarkably readable (The Irish Times (Dublin))

About the Author

David Coward is Professor of French at the University of Leeds. He has edited all OUP's Dumas titles and is the translator of Maupassant: Mademoiselle Fifi and A Day in the Country.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
To read the whole 3 musketeers canon, this must be included, as it is volume 4 of the five. It covers the bit just before the Man in the Iron Mask, and reading this certainly makes TMITIM alot more understandable. Reading the whole lot also tells you that none of the films of TTM of TMITIM have done the stories justice.
They are a retelling of the history of the French court over the period from the about midpoint of Louis XIII's reign (TTM) to the early 1660s, when Louis XIV was taking power from Mazarin. The stories are, like all Dumas's histories, heavily romanticised, historical characters being freely - loosely even -intermingled with fictional and semi-fictional (e.g d'Artagnan), and C17 activities being rewritten for C19 sensitivities - King and mistresses never actually seem to bonk, for example, passionate kissing symbolising it all unspoken.
This translation, with copious historical notes, is a good rollicking read, and highly recommended.
Comment 7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read many of Dumas' books, including The 3 Musketeers and Twenty years after I was reall looking forward to the Vicomte de Bragleonne trilogy. Having finished all three books I can only conclude that two out of three aint bad!

The first part, also called the Vicomte de Bragleonne, was very good - didn't add too much to the core Musketeer story, but stuck to the high paced excitement of its predecessors. The third part, The Man in the Iron mask was excellent - a fitting conclusion to the saga.

Unfortunately this part, Louise de Valliere, was in my opinion awful. Most of our regular heroes disappear for most of the book, to be replaced with limp courtiers; there is very little link to the main storyline taken up in The Man in the Iron Mask; and it is far too long and slow. Half way through I was so bored I even considered giving up - almost a first.

My advice would be to give this book a miss - I have friends who went straight from Twenty Years After to The Man in the Iron Mask and didn't even realise they had missed this one out.
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It's 1661 and Louis the XIV is taking over the reign of government from his ministers. D'Artagnan is captain of the Musketeers, Aramis is now a bishop, Porthos is as big, strong and hungry as ever and Raoul, the son of Athos, is still madly in love with Louise De La Valliere. What we do see of Aramis he is plotting and scheming and has a strong interest in a mysterious prisoner in the Bastille.

Louis' effeminate brother Philippe (Monsieur) has just married Henrietta (Madame) of England, but Henrietta only has eyes for Louis, an attraction that Louis returns. In order to allay suspicion of Louis' jealous brother, Louis feigns an attraction to Louise (who is one of Madame's ladies in waiting), but finds himself trapped by his own schemes when he falls in love with her. LOL, some of the antics involved in trying to be alone with Louise that are constantly hampered by Madame's efforts to keep them apart.

This book is different from the preceding novels of the Musketeers -- there is little if any of the swashbuckling, sword fights and derring do that the other books contained. This book focuses on the love story of Louis and Louise, along with the pomp, intrigues and scandals of Louis XIV's court. Although some readers will be disappointed at the virtual absence of the Musketeers in this book, I was fascinated at the glimpses of French history and court life which was beautifully sprinkled with laugh out loud humor reading the antics of the French court, most especially the "revolving" confessions at the Royal Oak tree.

If you've come this far, you've already read The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte De Bragelonne.
Read more ›
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 13 Jun. 2000
Format: Paperback
This is part of the final instalment of the musketeers trilogy, and this is no doubt where much confusion arises. After the completion of The Three Musketeers in 1844 and Twenty Years After in 1845 Dumas once again returned to the musketeers for one final outing. Published in serial form between 1847 and 1850 The Vicomte De Bragelonne is a massive work. So massive in fact that it is normally not published as one edition (as is the case with the current Oxford edition) the first part of which is, confusingly, normally called The Vicomte De Bragelonne. The second and third parts are given the titles Louise De La Valliere and The Man in the Iron Mask respectively.
Louise De La Valliere should not, therefore, be read out of sequence as it will not make much sense. It is the middle part of a long novel, during which Dumas spends most of his time setting up for the climax that will take place in The Man in The Iron Mask. As such the book can, at times, seem slow and inconsequential with the musketeers barley appearing at all. It is however a good story, although not what we might have expected and it is definitely worth getting through not least because The Man in the Iron Mask is so fantastic and will not make sense without this.
Louise is a beautiful and well told story, if a little slower than one might expect from the author.
Comment 20 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback