Lost in Translation 2003

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(353) IMDb 7.8/10
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Winner of an Academy Award in 2003 for best original screenplay and three Golden Globe awards including best actor for Bill Murray, Sofia Coppola's poignant drama about Americans abroad stars Bill Murray as Bob Harris, a movie actor well past his prime who is in Tokyo to shoot a whiskey commercial.

Starring:
Bill Murray,Scarlett Johansson
Runtime:
1 hour, 41 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Comedy
Director Sofia Coppola
Starring Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson
Supporting actors Giovanni Ribisi
Studio Momentum Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Film Buff on 16 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD
I first saw Sofia Coppola's 2003 love story Lost in Translation a few years ago and was distinctly underwhelmed. Seeing it again I now realize that while it has irredeemable flaws which definitely qualify the inflated critical praise this film has received, it is actually much better than I had thought. The narrative concerns two Americans stuck in a luxury Tokyo Hotel. Bob Harris (Bill Murray) is a semi-retired Hollywood actor in Tokyo for a week to shoot a whiskey commercial. Married for 25 years, he is in mid-life crisis. The geographical distance between himself and his family emphasizes the emotional chasm that exists between him and them. Suffering from terminal jet lag he parks himself for the week in the sprawling `New York bar' on the top floor of the hotel. Charlotte (a 17 year old Scarlett Johansson) has just graduated college and is in Japan with her workaholic photographer husband John (Giovanni Ribisi) who is on a fashion shoot. Left alone most of the time she contemplates the sad state of her 2 year marriage and reflects on the fact that she doesn't really know what to do with her life. Also suffering from jet lag she meets Bob in the bar. Two insomniac kindred lost spirits connecting, the two tentatively embark on a relationship.

What plot there is centers on little incidents, little adventures Bob and Charlotte share. They eat sushi, visit a hospital to sort out a suspect toe, have a night on the town with Japanese friends which involves drinking, clubbing and karaokeing, and (in the film's most moving scene) watch a movie together on TV (La Dolce Vita of course) in her room and talk about life and marriage which is anything but sweet for either of them. "Does it get better?" asks the young Charlotte.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Joe on 5 Nov. 2012
Format: Blu-ray
There are a lot of negative reviews for this film.

I loved it.

I have trouble putting my thoughts down into words, so Ill just say this; (Ive never used a semi-colon in my life, so I took a shot) If your'e an introspective, evaluative and emotional person who is possibly troubled by life, then you should watch this. If you aren't, stay away.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By amantedofado on 20 Nov. 2007
Format: DVD
Lost in Translation does something few other American films do (Stillwell's Metropolitan is the other one), and that is to give us a drama that consists of silences and dialogue, with no action. Only the French (e.g. Rohmer) do this well and consistently. It makes for intelligent scripting, nuanced acting, and rivetting viewing. For older men (like myself) it sets out calmly and without too much emotion the dilemma of meeting someone who is right thirty or forty years too late. By setting this late love in such an exotic and alienating place (the hotel and Tokyo beyond it), there is no need to exaggerate the emotions of the two main characters. Those reviewers who have given the film one star may be lacking a maturity of understanding that a film like this calls for. If you like understated French cinema, you'll revel in this. If only Hollywood allowed more films of this genre to be made, its reputation would receive a huge boost.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 25 April 2012
Format: DVD
I looked in on this as I am a bit of a fan of Bill Murray (especially in his recent Wes Anderson collaborations) and the ad line `hysterically funny' on the front of the case sealed the deal. I guess the ad line must have been mis-translated, as there were very few laughs to be found here.

So once I had got over the disappointment of not finding a classic Bill Murray off beat comedy, what did I find? Murray and Johansson play two Americans in Tokyo, both lost in the city and in life in general. The film shows a series of encounters between the two as the go on their own journeys of self discovery. It is at times touching, there is the odd smile here and there, and it is a refreshingly unconventional piece of story telling, where much is left unexplained and you have a feeling of merely observing these people remotely and never really getting to know them.

Murray and Johansson are pretty good in the leads, playing characters that are quite natural and believable. Murray in particular dials down the zaniness to give us a regular guy with whom we can connect. It's actually a great performance form him, with quite a bit of understated humour and great timing that keeps you smiling, if not laughing. Johansson is equally good, displaying that confusion that we all felt at that time of life about our future to a tee.

In all a pretty good film with a style that is rather unusual for the mainstream. I can see why it was such a hit. It missed the spot for me personally, mainly I think because from the advertising I was expecting an out and out comedy, so only 4 stars.
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Peter J. Murphy on 10 Oct. 2008
Format: DVD
I'm shocked! The reviews of this are really surprising, to say the least. The moment I started watching this movie I was drawn in and couldn't get out even after the movie was finished.

And usually, a movie with as simplistic a plot as this wouldn't interest me greatly, but this is an unusual movie in its presentation and in the character portrayal. The film itself is basically a study of a romantic relationship between two less-than-happy individuals, both of whom meet in a world vastly different from their own. We are forced to see the lonesome atmosphere in the characters as they sit alone in their respective hotel rooms and also in the desolate neon Tokyo scenery.

The film is truly an adaptation of Rick and Ilsa in Paris. The film contains moments of humour, darkness and painfully sad ending all of which allude to the main features of Casablanca. The film is even referenced by the Japanese commercial director as he describes in vast detail to Murray's character, how to present the whiskey (which is lost in translation through the interpreter).

It's sad that people today can't see more than what is blatantly and obnoxiously slapped on our screens. It's a film to demands your imagination as much as your intention. It was a similar style practiced by Shakespeare and his original on-stage productions. Obviously not aimed at the less analytically inclined amongst us, some of the below reviewers may have been looking for a James Bond film perhaps?
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