Lore 2012

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(32) IMDb 7.1/10
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Stranded with her younger siblings after their Nazi parents are imprisoned, LORE leads the remains of her family across war-torn Germany in 1945. To survive the children must reach their Grandmotherās house in the North but amidst the chaos of a defeated nation, Lore meet a young Jewish refugee called Thomas. In order to survive Lore must learn to trust a person she has been taught to hate. And as the consequences of her parentās actions and beliefs apparent, Lore must also start to face the darkness within herself.

Starring:
Nele Trebs And Andre Frid, Saskia Rosendahl
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Lore

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 45 minutes
Starring Nele Trebs And Andre Frid, Saskia Rosendahl, Mika Seidel, Kai-Peter Malina, Ursina Lardi
Director Cate Shortland
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 27 May 2013
Main languages German
Subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 45 minutes
Starring Nele Trebs And Andre Frid, Saskia Rosendahl, Mika Seidel, Kai-Peter Malina, Ursina Lardi
Director Cate Shortland
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 27 May 2013
Main languages German
Subtitles English

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By S. J. Williams TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Mar. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Some plot detail in paras 1 & 2!

'Lore' tells the story of 15 year old Hannelore and her younger siblings, Liesel, Jurgen, Gunter and a baby-in-arms as they cross Germany from Bavaria to Hamburg in the immediate aftershocks of their country's defeat, searching for the home of their grandmother. Their father, clearly involved in the work of the einsatzgrupen, extermination squads or camps, has disappeared, fleeing, one imagines, capture and retribution for the crimes he has committed: just before leaving he burns official Nazi documents which also suggest some involvement in the 'disposal' of 'mental defectives'. The mother, we gather, is complicit in some of these monstrosities as she leaves home to give herself up to the Americans: she leaves Lore with the children and the instruction to reach Hamburg, which is hundreds of miles away. During the journey they become reluctant companions of Thomas who bears a camp number on his wrist and ID cards: without their own, his documents and the story that they are one family represents a kind of lifeline to ease their passage through the chaos of their partitioned homeland. As a Nazi child, her acceptance of such a lie is traumatic.

The journey is a baptism of fire for Lore: she despises Jews and clearly wants nothing to do with any form of 'tainted' humanity. However, the journey imposes a slow, new and increasingly horrified awareness of the reality of Hitler's Germany. She meets no spontaneous kindness or generosity and is forced to adopt increasingly feral tactics to enable her own and her family's survival. She almost breaks completely in the face of some of her actions. Her desire for warmth, developing sexual awareness and simple dependence draw her into a connection with Thomas which is highly conflicted.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gerard P. on 25 Nov. 2013
Format: DVD
This film does exactly what a film should do: it tells a story worth telling, in images and episodes. The horrors of Germany 1945 are made plastic not by showing them all by giving us a few harrowing examples. This is a coming-of-age film, in spite of the unusual context: Lore loves her father above all but in the course of their long journey is gradually forced to come to terms with his evil past (which is not disclosed in detail). And when she finally reaches journey's end, the confrontation with her grandmother illustrates the kind of family background which facilitated the descent in to the evils of the Third Reich. There is unlikely to be a good outcome for Lore herself but through her courage and persistence, she has probably succeeded in 'rescuing' those of the children who survive the trip. Her parents are off-stage but they are not dead, so sooner or later she is going to have to confront them personally.

Cate Shortland makes her points considerably better than the book, Rachael Seiffert's 'The Dark Room'. See my book review. And I cannot at all agree that the film is over-long, or that it has all been done before, except in the trivial sense that everything has always been done before. One needs a certain length to convey a sense of the difficulties of the children's journey, and the developmental processes they are going through in the course of that journey.

Well worth watching, even if it is hardly an evening of easy-going entertainment.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By J. TULLOCH on 24 Mar. 2013
Format: DVD
Just a note to add to the two previous reviews, in that this powerful film is based on the middle story within a book by Rachel Seiffert which is called 'The Dark Room.' All the stories in her novel deal with the pressures and complexities of this period of German history and of its affect on her different characters. This series of time-linked stories is well written and perhaps we may get another film from it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Peter of SE7 on 10 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD
A tale of the end of innocence, at the time when innocence itself was shattered - the collapse of the Nazi regime, and a time when much of Europe was on the move. I suppose it's a metaphor as old as storytelling itself - the outer journey influencing the inner - but this is done very well, with very good performances from the children, and especially Rosendahl. The decision to make the film in German was spot-on ("The Reader" was spoiled for me by not doing that), and very little about this intense and well-conceived film rings false.
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By G. Phillips on 2 Mar. 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is, by any standards, one of the best films made about the Third Reich and its collapse, perhaps better than either 'Germany:Year Zero' or 'Germany Pale Mother'. Unlike other recent films about this period, it was refreshingly free of the usual tiresome cliches, simplifications and the contemptuous apologia of such films as 'Stalingrad', 'Downfall' or the morally excreble 'The Reader'. What impressed me, over and above the superb direction, dialogue, cinematography and bravura performances of a very young cast, was the sheer subtlety of the script and the respect the director had for the audience's intelligence and their understanding of history. Understated visual references were used to excellent effect, rather than the usual heavy-handed realisations of Nazi power and indoctrination- 'Vati' being a member of the Totenkopfverbande, the glimpses of his eugenicist files, of Lore's HJ uniform, the Allach porcelain figure. More than this, the character of 'Thomas' was impressively ambiguous as both possible victim and/or perpetrator, serving to underscore the chaos of not only the end of the dictatorship and the war, but also the collapse of moral values brought about by Nazism itself and the systematic and inhuman degradation of nearly all of those who came into contact with it, from the children of the Nazis themselves to the victims of their persecutions. The viewer never really knows whether the character is a Jewish man who has survived, a DP ('Displaced Person'), perhaps an escaped slave labourer, a German deserter, a war criminal himself, nor is his nationality revealed- which to me, is an overt statement of simple humanity, regardless of 'race' or any social status.Read more ›
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