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Lords of the Bow (Conqueror, Book 2) Paperback – 8 Jul 2010

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Frequently Bought Together

Lords of the Bow (Conqueror, Book 2) + Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) + Wolf of the Plains (Conqueror, Book 1)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (8 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000735326X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007353262
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (210 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,318 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in London, Conn Iggulden read English at London University and worked as a teacher for seven years before becoming a full-time writer. Married with three children, he lives in Hertfordshire. Since publication of 'The Gates of Rome', Conn has written a further thirteen books including the wildly successful 'The Dangerous Book for Boys'.

Product Description

Review

‘Iggulden is in a class of his own when it comes to epic, historical fiction’ Daily Mirror

‘Iggulden…tells an absolutely cracking story…the pace is nail-biting and the set dressing magnificent’ The Times

‘Iggulden weaves an entertaining tale of this world of men, swords, bows and the call of war and the plains’ Daily Express

‘I felt as if a blockbuster movie was unfolding before me…read the book before Hollywood takes it over’ Daily Express

From the Publisher

A major new series on Genghis Khan from the number one bestselling co-author of `The Dangerous Book For Boys'
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By TG XIX on 17 Jan. 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is Conn Iggulden's best book to date. Wolf of the Plains was a magnificent book which can now be seen in context as a very good prologue to this remarkable next chapter in the Genghis Khan story.

With military detail, political intrigue, cultural richness and thrills and spills aplenty you cannot help but read this book in double quick time. The descriptions of battle (particularly breaking through the Great Wall for the first time and the battle at Badgers Mouth) are stunning and utterly compelling. But the story lines of the politics, diplomacy and "human interest" are no less readable in their way. There is so much for everyone in this book.

The sense of scale is awesomely expressed and again, like Wolf of the Plains, you can almost feel the weather and experience the vibrancy of the Monghol horde. There is brutality in the book, but it is integral and important to the realism of the story and the times; not gratuitous.

With rich story lines for the rulers, generals, spies, foot soldiers and assasins throughout this book you build a rich kaleidoscope of image and emotions. You also cannot help but learn historic fact. Granted this is a fictional book, but the technologies, techniques, weaponry, politics and many of the characters were real.

I loved this book and it was a shame to finish it. A year to wait for the next one? I really hope not.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By K. J. Ekermawi on 6 Jun. 2008
Format: Hardcover
When I read Lord of the Bow, during my holiday, I knew that I should take a rest from reading, put the book down and go out site-seeing, but unfortunately, the mistake of taking this book with me has already been committed! I was unable to put it down. I find it very difficult to find writers who can put melees without sounding like they are doctoring the whole situation so that somehow they come out smart strategists in the end. Conn is a very talented strategist and can put details in a way that makes you not want miss a line because you know it all counts when you get to the numerous great fights. This is a really good book and nothing less of the many other books Conn had authored about war. It also gives us men a very good insight into the politics of man and the effects of power on us.
I just hope that 1, Conn would not be as explicit with sexual encounters and 2, that he would write the next book asap!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. I. Harrison on 6 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
I greatly enjoyed this next chapter of the Genghis story but not as much as Wolf of the Plains.
I think this is partly history's fault, Genghis was so all conquering that this books lacks for a bit of competative tension, also, whereas the first book made you very sympathetic to Genghis cause, following his childhood exile, in this his exploits of mass slaughter, rape and plunder make him a little less easy to share a camp fire with. Iggulden tries to a degree to excuse his actions as him 'removing the foot of the Chin from the neck of his people' however as the book progresses this is hard to buy and I really don't think he should bother, Genghis is what he is, the original meglamaniac.
The intrigue with his sons and ancestors is where the Mongol story really gets interesting and I do hope Mr Iggulden explores this part of history for us rather than stopping with the death of the great Khan himself.
Then I hope he does for the Alexander story what he did for Julius Caesar, as I don't want to think of him as Colin Farrell for the rest of my days.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By MLA VINE VOICE on 18 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The second book in the Conqueror series is an outstanding contribution to the historical fiction genre. Following on from Wolf of the Plains, Lords of the Bow begins with the Mongol nation having been united under the rule of Temujin, the Genghis Khan. Fighting and conquering rival nomadic factions, the tribes are drawn together under the leadership of one man for the first time. This momentous turning point in history is given a superb treatment from Iggulden. Temujin's character, his flaws and his abilities follow on without halt from book 1 and the character development of those around him is of the very highest order.

In particular, it is the relationships that form and ebb throughout the book that knit the whole together. The narrative of battle, conquering, and violence is well known history but Iggulden's characters are believable. Iggulden understands that being ruthless was a fundamental part of the success of Genghis. He is tested as are his brothers by those who have seen their own authority diminished by the rise of Temujin. The differences between the characters are intriguingly drawn for the modern audience - Temuge for instance is derided consistently for his lack of abilities but he is the one who most closely represents the modern day aesthetic and he who is relied on to take care of the pragmatic busines of running a nation.

Temujin's other brothers Khasar and Kachuin form differing characters - Khasar the traditional barbarian, perhaps the model to which we still view the Mongol hordes as a savage and unstoppable brute. Kachuin though is the more subtle picture, his worldview coloured by the events of book 1 and the bond established during that time with Temujin.

It is the relationship with women though that is the most impressive.
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