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Lord Krishna's Cuisine: Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking Hardcover – Mar 1987


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Hardcover, Mar 1987
£48.13 £32.80


Product details

  • Hardcover: 804 pages
  • Publisher: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (Mar. 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896470202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896470200
  • Product Dimensions: 25.7 x 18.8 x 5.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,022,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 April 2002
Format: Hardcover
This really is an amazing book. Living in the Subcontinent, one does become a little wary of "outsiders" writing about Indian cooking. Moreover, the introduction to the cookbook is even more worrying as the author turns out to have been a disciple to a guru. Not the stuff that great cooking is made up off! However, once you get into the nitty gritty, this is an amazing book. The variations that Devi packs into this tome makes you think twice about vegetarian cookery as being dull in any sense of the word. The chapters are neatly grouped and the recipes do really work. They are both "authentic" and adventurous at the same time. The book is not easy going. My copy has no photographs and a few line drawings to get you going. The ingredients are easily available. Infinitely better than many other writers who are targetting a western vote.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Nov. 1999
Format: Hardcover
More than a recipe book, this is a wonderful source of information, reflecting the author's devotion to Indian vegetarian cuisine and its roots in the Hindu religion.
Merely opening the book is enough to bring an aura of calm to your kitchen. Following one of the hundreds of recipes will bring you useful information as well as clearly written instructions.
Don't be daunted by its cost. The book offers information to assure the cook uncertain about exotic ingredients and unusual methods and at nearly 800 pages, it will be a resource to use for years before you need to repeat a single recipe.
PS Try the Bubbly Lime Cooler (Khajur Gur Nimbu Jal) as a refreshing beverage to enhance your next Indian meal.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "andrewspencer" on 29 Jan. 2006
Format: Hardcover
If you are vegetarian, you need this book. If you aren't a vegetarian, buy it and you will realise you don't need to eat meat. I have about 100 recipe books, but this one is number one. If I could give it more stars, I would.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas J Walker on 12 Mar. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book in 2007 because I liked the look of an all-vegetarian cookbook of Indian food. I had not expected that it would be so completely comprehensive- it is equivalent to tomes such as Mrs Beeton or Larousse Gastronomique, in that it contains the fundamentals from the ground upwards, of how to create all the standard stuff from Chapatis and Ghee and home made yoghurt and panir, right up to complex dishes of all sorts- encompassing the entire range of what the Indian Subcontinent, arguably the world leaders in vegetarian cuisine, can create from what sometimes seem like simple ingredients.

It is a grown up cookbook with no pictures, bar some simple line drawings, but this by no means diminishes its enjoyability- with more than 500 recipes it would be foolish to attempt to illustrate it more richly. I would advise starting with a few dishes which sound familiar, and prepare to be amazed. For example, the Mung Bean and Panir dish on page 69, whilst sounding potentially rather ordinary and maybe a bit more whole-foody than some would want from a bog standard 'curry' book, turns out to be an astoundingly delicious dish which we return to gleefully every time we get the opportunity- and its so simple.
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