Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Lord John and the Brother... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Best quality EX-LIBRARY copy, may have some stamps, marks etc
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade: 3 (Lord John series) Paperback – 4 Sep 2008

45 customer reviews

See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£2.81 £0.01
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade: 3 (Lord John series) + Lord John and the Hand of Devils: 3 (Lord John Grey serie) + Lord John And The Private Matter
Price For All Three: £23.97

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099463334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099463337
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 124,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Diana Gabaldon is the internationally bestselling author of many historical novels including Cross Stitch, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, Drums of Autumn, The Fiery Cross and A Breath of Snow Ashes. She lives with her family in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Product Description

Review

"Gabaldon provides a rich, abundantly researched, entirely readable portrait of life among the English upper classes in the 1750s. From London's literary salons and political intrigue to fearsome battle scenes in the Seven Years' War, her writing is always vivid and often lyrical" (The Washington Post)

Book Description

The breathtaking new novel from Top Ten Sunday Times bestselling author Diana Gabaldon

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Furio on 17 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
... but this is the only serious complaint I have about this book: there are minor flaws (therefore the four stars) but they are just that, minor, only quoted for the sake of a thorough review and full information.

Many reviewers have complained about the explicit -homo-sexual content of this novel; such remarks left me flabbergasted: how prudish can some readers be? Ms Gabaldon has clearly made a point of creating a main character who is likeable, honourable AND gay. The plot includes this character having an affair (not exactly love but neither a one night stand) and the physical side of this affair is not only relevant to the story but also logical: Lord John is not yet 30, after all. Moreover, the author does not go into fine detail: she mentions sex, physical attraction, she shows her characters in between the sheets but her scenes are first and foremost sensual, not pornographic. This book can be read, in my opinion, by older teens as well.

The plot, spun within a timespan of a couple of months, is fairly complex and engaging but not convoluted and everything is clearly explained in good time (except the title). The ending is perhaps a little hurried (one of the minor flaws I was writing above) but no cliffhanger mars a satisfying storyline.
Characterization is excellent in the case of the mains, good nearly everywhere else. The "nearly" could be due to the POV of the story being that of Lord John and not that of an omniscient narrator.
I was not boundless happy about the character of Fraser: I understand he is the main of a successfull serial (most of the complaints for the gay content seem to come from fans of this serial which, I hear, is rather graphic but "straight"), but here he is just stiff, prudish, unmoveable and unchanging.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Eileen Shaw TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 4 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the third of the Lord John books, but not having read the first two wasn't an impediment as Gabaldon fills the reader in on previous events very naturally and succinctly. This is a ripper - of breeches rather than bodices - and it's tremendous fun. It is 1758 and Lord John Gray is set to join his regiment fighting in the Seven Years War, attached to Prussian and German forces at the Battle of Krefeld. The real glory would be with the regiments fighting in France, but Lord John and his older brother Hal have had to curb any protest because of the death of their father at his own hand. Hal has let the Dukedom he inherited at his father's death relapse, rather than face any further loss of honour.

Before Lord John can set off, however, he meets Percy Wainwright, who is to be their step-brother on the marriage of their mother, Benedicta, Dowager Countess of Melton, to Wainwright's step-father, General Sir George Stanley. The various relationships and titles are quite confusing at first, but the characterisation is very good and soon solves these trifling problems.

The attraction of Lord John to Percy soon resolves into a full-blooded sexual liaison - well depicted and empathetically unambiguous. Lord John retains a deeper attachment to a Scottish prisoner, Jamie Fraser, though his feelings are not reciprocated. A rip-roaring tale ensues as Lord John sets out to resolve the dishonour of his father's death. The violent antipathy of the time to any taint of homosexuality lends an added sense of danger. This novel has battle-scenes of unremitting realism and a plot dealing with murky manoeuvring, not only in the corridors of power, but also in the coffee houses, the gentlemen's clubs and in the clamorous slums of early-Georgian London. This addictively authentic historical shocker is full of energy, well-paced and most enjoyable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 16 May 2008
Format: Paperback
At the risk of upsetting all the fanatical Jamie & Clare fans out there, I'll dare to say that this is a far better read than the last of the Outlander series (Drums of Autumn, Fiery Cross, Breath of Snow and Ashes) where I felt Gabaldon has written herself into a corner and simply run out of imagination hence recycling old plots (how many times can members of the same family get actually or nearly raped, for goodness sakes?!). At last she's given herself an exit and I felt her imagination has been revitalised and refreshed.

To be honest I didn't remember much about Lord John from J&C but that's really not a problem as the important stuff from the back story is fleshed out here. I also haven't read the first Lord John book, but again that's really not a problem for first-time readers.

Set some years after the 1745 Jacobite rebellion this is a multiple-standed novel following Lord John Grey as he untangles the mystery of his father's disgrace and suicide; gets embroiled in a steamy homosexual affair with his step-brother and fellow army officer; and deals with his relationship with Jamie Fraser.

Lord John is an interesting character with far more going on beneath his surface than at first appears, and the relationships between him and his family are portrayed with a light but profound touch. Similarly his affair with Percy and his unrequited love for Jamie are lightly-brushed but no less deep for all that. Gabaldon does best in refusing to indulge in histrionics and the drama is no less moving for being hinted at rather than spelled out at length.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback