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Lord Alfred Douglas Hardcover – 4 Oct 1984


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Hardcover, 4 Oct 1984
£140.40 £1.67



Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Methuen Publishing Ltd; First edition edition (4 Oct 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0413507904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0413507907
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,052,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Very Good, 1st Edition. Thick Royal 8vo. xvi + 366pp. Portrait frontispiece, profuse illustrations. Clean tight sound square, no bookplate, ownership inscription to title page. In bright gilt lettered cloth gently rubbed to spine, with very good original unclipped portrait pictorial dustwrapper.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
H Montgomery Hyde has written a very good biography of Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (1870-1945) who was a ‘poet’ and an intimate friend of Oscar Wilde. In 1894 Douglas translated Wilde’s ‘Salome’ into English from the French and in 1914 published an account of his life with Oscar: ‘Oscar Wilde and Myself’, and later in 1940: ‘Oscar Wilde: A Summing Up’. A good book about an awful man!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Cobra: Lord Alfred Douglas 10 Oct 2003
By Justin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In 1983, Sir Robert Helpmann gave the performance of his career in Justin Fleming's magnificent play, The Cobra, in the Sydney Opera House, as the aged Lord Alfred Douglas, set during World War Two, as Bosie looked back on his doomed relationship with Oscar Wilde. Regarded as the definitive theatrical treatment of Wilde and Douglas, the play observed among other things that Wilde was the first Irishman to leave Ireland, go to England and become Greek.
H Montgomery Hyde absolves Douglas of ruining Wilde, even finding Douglas "kindly" to younger people. This is a portrait hard to reconcile with the same Douglas who threw fits of ungovernable rage to have his way, and told various well wishers to butt out when they advised Oscar to go to France. Even the magistrate post-dated the warrant for Wilde's arrest to give him time to leave the country. Being Irish, why did Douglas insist on maintaining an Englishman's right to remain in England? Also, was it not critical that Douglas' insistance that Wilde sue the Mad Marquess of Queensberry was based on pure revenge against his hateful father?
Hyde's book is excellent, notwithstanding, as it allows us to be the judge. It is finely accounted, well researched and has the merit of considered clarity. A good read. But it should be read alongside the classic play, The Cobra.
The Cobra: Lord Alfred Douglas 10 Oct 2003
By Justin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Sir Robert Helpmann gave the performance of his career in Justin Fleming's classic play, The Cobra, in the Sydney Opera House, as the aged Lord Alfred Douglas, set during World War Two, as Bosie looked back on his doomed relationship with Oscar Wilde. Regarded as the definitive theatrical treatment of Wilde and Douglas, the play observed among other things that Wilde was the first Irishman to leave Ireland, go to England and become Greek.
H Montgomery Hyde absolves Douglas of ruining Wilde, even finding Douglas "kindly" to younger people. This is a portrait hard to reconcile with the same Douglas who threw fits of ungovernable rage to have his way, and told various well wishers to butt out when they advised Oscar to go to France. Even the magistrate post-dated the warrant for Wilde's arrest to give him time to leave the country. Being Irish, why did Douglas insist on maintaining an Englishman's right to remain in England? Also, was it not critical that Douglas' insistance that Wilde sue the Mad Marquess of Queensberry was based on pure revenge against his hateful father?
Hyde's book is excellent, notwithstanding, as it allows us to be the judge. It is finely accounted, well researched and has the merit of considered clarity. A good read. But it should be read alongside the classic play, The Cobra.
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