or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Lonely Planet Guatemala (Travel Guide) [Paperback]

Lonely Planet , Schechter , Vidgen
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
RRP: £14.99
Price: £11.66 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £3.33 (22%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 22 Oct.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback £9.77  
Paperback, 22 Oct 2010 £11.66  
There is a newer edition of this item:
Lonely Planet Guatemala (Travel Guide) Lonely Planet Guatemala (Travel Guide) 2.0 out of 5 stars (1)
£11.29
In stock.

Book Description

22 Oct 2010 Travel Guide

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher

From the vibrant street markets in Chichicastenango, through the radiant Maya ruins of Tikal, paragliding over Lago de Atitlán and to the colonial splendor of Antigua, our expert authors reveal the very best Guatemala has to offer.

  • Tailored itineraries to help you plan your trip
  • Full-color highlights section showcasing the top sights and activities
  • 57 Detailed and easy-to-use maps
  • Unique Green index makes ecofriendly travel that much easier

Lonely Planet gets you to the heart of a place. Our job is to make amazing travel experiences happen. We visit the places we write about each and every edition. We never take freebies for positive coverage, so you can always rely on us to tell it like it is.

Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet, Lucas Vidgen, and Daniel C Schechter.

About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travellers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in.

TripAdvisor Travelers' Choice Awards 2012 and 2013 winner in Favorite Travel Guide category

'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times

'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' - Fairfax Media (Australia)


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Between 20-26 October 2014, spend £10 in a single order on item(s) dispatched from and sold by Amazon.co.uk and receive a £2 promotional code to spend in the Amazon Appstore. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Lonely Planet Guatemala (Travel Guide) + Lonely Planet Mexico (Travel Guide)
Price For Both: £25.15

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 4 edition (22 Oct 2010)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 1741791499
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741791495
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 13.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 418,024 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

For sheer global reach and dogged research, attention must be paid to Lonely Planet...' --Los Angeles Times, February 2, 2003
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars patchy, a rush job? 22 Nov 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I used this guide for a three month trip to Guatemala June-September 2001, during which time I spent six weeks in Antigua improving my Spanish at the Sevilla school and another six weeks travelling through the Western Highlands, El Petén and a quick trip into Honduras to the island of Utila.
Generally Antigua was covered adequately, though many things are already out of date as there have been many changes. Judging by the listings this guide was researched a long time ago, as according to my Spanish teacher many of the restaurants and bars recommended had been closed for several years. Also in this section the book mistakenly labels "Volcano Agua" as "Volcano Fuego". As this peak (Agua) is directly to the south of the town, and every language student uses it as a landmark, this is a pretty fundamental error. Not the most promising start, for a budding volcano-climber like myself - I ended up taking a volcano tour (around $6) rather than risk it.
Things didn't improve much in Lago de Atitlan, where I also studied for week. There are now five Spanish schools in San Pedro, though the book only mentions one. Also the book seems to have a rather naive, hippy-dippy sensibility towards the nature of the village, talking about "being greeted by the sweet waft of marijuana" and so on. Yes, San Pedro has a dope-smoking scene, but several travellers were being busted (some set up) for a joint or two while I was there, and there was also a (un) healthy cocaine (including crack) "scene". The LP seemed be blissfully ignorant of all this, locked in some sixties nostalgia timewarp. There are also serious social problems, gangs and abject poverty in San Pedro. Travellers are being mugged on a very regular basis on the volcano.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent as normal 18 Oct 2013
By SP
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
You can't go wrong with LP. This book, as normal, gives you all the top tips and is full of helpful information to make any trip easy.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Good 6 Jan 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I found that the purchase was exactly as described and worked well in the environment intended.
Good value for money
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars patchy at best 16 Nov 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I used this guide for a three month trip to Guatemala June-September 2001, during which time I spent six weeks in Antigua improving my Spanish at the Sevilla school and another six weeks travelling through the Western Highlands, El Petén and a quick trip into Honduras to the island of Utila.
Generally Antigua was covered adequately, though many things are already out of date as there have been many changes. Judging by the listings this guide was researched a long time ago, as according to my Spanish teacher many of the restaurants and bars recommended had been closed for several years. Also in this section the book mistakenly labels "Volcano Agua" as "Volcano Fuego". As this peak (Agua) is directly to the south of the town, and every language student uses it as a landmark, this is a pretty fundamental error. Not the most promising start, for a budding volcano-climber like myself - I ended up taking a volcano tour (around $6) rather than risk it.
Things didn't improve much in Lago de Atitlan, where I also studied for week. There are now five Spanish schools in San Pedro, though the book only mentions one. Also the book seems to have a rather naive, hippy-dippy sensibility towards the nature of the village, talking about "being greeted by the sweet waft of marijuana" and so on. Yes, San Pedro has a dope-smoking scene, but several travellers were being busted (some set up) for a joint or two while I was there, and there was also a (un) healthy cocaine (including crack) "scene". The LP seemed be blissfully ignorant of all this, locked in some sixties nostalgia timewarp. There are also serious social problems, gangs and abject poverty in San Pedro. Travellers are being mugged on a very regular basis on the volcano.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  23 reviews
107 of 117 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reviewed this one, but bought Rough Guide 23 Nov 2001
By Nancy Gibson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have travelled to Guatemala, Belize and Honduras several times over the last 4 years. I met Conner at a friend's office in Guatemala City while she was researching and writing this book. My husband and I had a fantastic time visiting with Conner and sharing travel stories. I see from some of the other comments that readers felt that the book was rushed and not well researched. I know for a fact that Conner had lost valuable notes on the highlands while in another part of the country and was going back thru the highlands to rebuild her notes. I'm not surprised that this section is not complete. Additionally, I met Conner the day after the WTA Riots in Seattle, Washington. That was in December 1999. Things can change quickly in some areas of Guatemala. Other others don't ever change. Depending on the government. She did tell us of her harrowing hike to El Mirador. In general, when I reviewed the book, I found information to be OK.
However, I have found over the years we've travelled that the Rough Guide is more accurate. We have also met the writer for the Rough Guide, Peter Eltringham while travelling in Belize. Peter has a wealth of information and is brutally honest about what to expect. Especially if you want bus schedules, travel times for busses, dangerous areas. The Rough Guide makes sure that travel advisories are noted. For instance, the danger around the Lake Atitlan area for tourists. I've also found that the Rough Guide is considerable more accurate with regard to price ranges for accomodations. The maps that are included are also very good.
For those of you who have never travelled to Guatemala. It is a beautiful country. The people are poor but friendly. Just like travelling anywhere -- don't leave your better judgment at home. If it looks like a rough area, it probably is. We never travel at night. We always check with out local host/hostess at whatever accomodations that we are staying at for information about the area -- crime, areas to stay away from etc.
That said -- I've camped in the jungles at Mayan ruins. I've hiked into Salpeten. I've taken a pickup truck from Copan to the border of Guatemala, then the chicken bus to Chiquimula and then a bus to Guatemla City and to Antigua in one day. I've travelled overland from Belize City to Flores more times than I can remember. I'm looking forward to spending more time at Lake Atitlan, probably in Santa Cruz or San Marcos. Also, looking forward to Rio Dulce and Coban.
If you've never travelled independently before, I'd say get both books. The Lonely Planet and the Rough Guide. Both writers are experienced travellers. If you get hooked on travelling independently (that is no formal guide service) -- you'll start to develop your own resources.
72 of 79 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Sad Day for Lonely Planet 1 Jan 2008
By Robert C. Klingenberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have been buying and recommending Lonely Planet guides on Latin America for 25 years. They have been indispensible for the budget traveler. I know I have saved probably thousands of dollars. I have pushed the books on many places on the internet including my own web sites and on Lonely Planet. Why? Love the layout. They are particularly good for someone arriving in new city who needs to get quickly and safely from their transport to hotel. The maps are generally accurate. LP editors have kept a consistency of design across the different books. The reader who is used to one will find using the others easy.

I also like the LP guarantee of integrity where LP authors do not accept free rooms, meals, etc. from places they review. I know the travel industry and this is not a universal practice.

Of all the countries in Latin America, Guatemala is my favorite. If you can only visit one, that's the place to go. I am saddened by what has happened to the latest volume. The other reviews here and on other sites point out omissions and places where the author has not updated widely known facts. That could be excused if taken in an isolated form. Anyone reading a guidebook must wonder how they check out all the places that are reviewed. But what concerns me the most is an apparent relaxing in Lonely Planet's standards of journalistic integrity. Until a short time ago, the author was the editor of a magazine and web site based in Xela, Guatemala called Xela Who. The magazine was a free publication that supported itself on the sale of advertisments, as did the web site. This is a direct conflict of interest. How can the author justify a review of an establishment that he sells advertising too? The author was directly involved in selling advertising. Any tourist related firm in Guatemala who receives a good LP review is bound to see it's business grow. How can they say no to someone trying to sell them ads in this situation? In a recent issue of Xela Who, the author, Lucas Vigden, was interviewed by a staff member as the author of the new Lonely Planet Guatemala. Never during this interview was it stated that Lucas was also the editor of the magazine. Numerous other readers and myself have contacted Lonely Planet and it's new corporate owner, the BBC about this situation. After several months there has still been no response.

Were this an isolated incident, in a vast publishing empire, one could expect Lonely Planet to reply and suggest a remedy. However, on a recent followup, the new LP Panama published a glowing review of a hostel. This place came in highly rated with the author proclaiming it their favorite. Reviews like that can double or triple an establishment's business. The problem: the hostel never opened. A Lonely Planet editor put it all off to an editing problem. One does not accidently write a glowing review of a non-existent at the time establishment unless some major conflict of interest is taking place. A concern amongst many long time LP readers is that now that the BBC, with it's well known journalistic bias, is in charge many LP authors will feel that since a concept such as integrity isn't maintained by BBC reporters, they won't have to either.
35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but contains some glaring errors 10 Mar 2001
By Ginger Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Let me start by saying that it is very difficult to keep up with the changing situations in Central America. However, Lonely Planet has chosen to flood the market with their books, which look to be hastily written and contain some glaring errors, such as identifying Agua Volcano as Fuego. Another suggests that there is a bus from Panajachel to San Antonio Polopo. This is not the case, you either have to go by private taxi or a "colectivo" (basically a pickup truck). Some of the ruins in Antigua have also been mididentified. I would suggest that they go back and do some personal research, Guatemala is a fantastic place to visit, I know, I've spent at least a month in the "Land of Eternal Spring" every year for the last 6. It's the best kept secret in Latin America.
29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An average book for the average traveler 11 Oct 2007
By Jared Cullison - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I bought this book and Moon Guatemala (Moon Handbooks) (they came out at the same time) and decided to write reviews for both. Unlike the Moon guide, I found Lonely Planet's Guatemala guide extremely disappointing. I expected much more from a resident author.

Where do I begin? For starters, you'll see the tourist hordes in Guatemala sporting this book and the previous edition of LP all over the place. It's like standard issue for people who haven't the ability to discern quality or think for themselves. You can be sure that if your hotel, restaurant or language school is in this guidebook it will be packed with the Lonely Planet sheep going along for the ride. Strangely, the author acknowledges this phenomenon in a sidebar and encourages travelers to seek out new places on their own. Speaking of sidebars, these are mostly a series of superficial interviews with local people; a nice idea in theory but not very well executed. I think the most helpful sidebars tend to expand upon material covered in the main text, which this book does not do very well.

The book also doesn't go into nearly as much depth as some of the other guides in terms of helpful background info, history and the like. Worthwhile destinations covered over several pages in some of the other guidebooks are often glossed over in a one-page summary here. It's like the abbreviated version of everything. In this regard, I think both Rough Guide and Moon do a much better job of giving travelers all the information they'll need. I also noticed that it seems very little updated from the previous edition. I'd say about 75% of the material already exists in the previous edition, sometimes verbatim, though they are different authors. Finally, the writing isn't the greatest. It might be nit-picking, but it was seriously hard to read the poor writing sometimes and you won't find yourself wanting to read this book from first page to last.

These are just a few issues off the top of my head. I know some well-heeled Guatemala travelers and residents who absolutely hate this guidebook and could probably do a much better job of pointing out its specific flaws. But if you're just along for the ride then by all means be my guest, though I'd at least consider a back-up plan. You'll thank me later.

Consider Moon Guatemala (Moon Handbooks), which I gave 5 stars. Rough Guide The Rough Guide to Guatemala 3 (Rough Guide Travel Guides) is also OK as a back-up.
41 of 47 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars patchy - a rush job? 16 Nov 2001
By Tom King - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I used this guide for a three month trip to Guatemala June-September 2001, during which time I spent six weeks in Antigua improving my Spanish at the Sevilla school and another six weeks travelling through the Western Highlands, El Petén and a quick trip into Honduras to the island of Utila.
Generally Antigua was covered adequately, though many things are already out of date as there have been many changes. Judging by the listings this guide was researched a long time ago, as according to my Spanish teacher many of the restaurants and bars recommended had been closed for several years. Also in this section the book mistakenly labels "Volcano Agua" as "Volcano Fuego". As this peak (Agua) is directly to the south of the town, and every language student uses it as a landmark, this is a pretty fundamental error. Not the most promising start, for a budding volcano-climber like myself - I ended up taking a volcano tour (around $6) rather than risk it.
Things didn't improve much in Lago de Atitlan, where I also studied for week. There are now five Spanish schools in San Pedro, though the book only mentions one. Also the book seems to have a rather naive, hippy-dippy sensibility towards the nature of the village, talking about "being greeted by the sweet waft of marijuana" and so on. Yes, San Pedro has a dope-smoking scene, but several travellers were being busted (some set up) for a joint or two while I was there, and there was also a (un) healthy cocaine (including crack) "scene". The LP seemed be blissfully ignorant of all this, locked in some sixties nostalgia timewarp. There are also serious social problems, gangs and abject poverty in San Pedro. Travellers are being mugged on a very regular basis on the volcano. A warning wouldn't have gone amiss.
In Peten, the LP covers Flores and Tikal reasonably, with accurate maps. There's no real coverage of the more remote sites however, the author dismisses the hike to Mirador as a five day hell-hike, while Yaxhá, Piedras Negras, Cancuén and many other sites are not even mentioned or barely touched.
In the east of the country, the Jungle route to Honduras that the author describes has no longer been necessary since 1998, when a new bridge was built over the river Montagua that divides the countries (which the guidebook spells "Monagua" on its cover...).
So overall, I have to say I was pretty disappointed with the guide, which for such a recent edition should have been better researched. I did find myself casting an eye over Rough Guide and Footprint readers' guidebooks when I could. This guide needs to be sorted out.
Tom
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback