£73.33
  • RRP: £75.00
  • You Save: £1.67 (2%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £0.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lone Wolf: The Life and Death of U-Boat Ace Werner Henke Hardcover – 30 Aug 1993


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£73.33
£35.39 £19.67


Trade In this Item for up to £0.25
Trade in Lone Wolf: The Life and Death of U-Boat Ace Werner Henke for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger Publishers (30 Aug 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0275936775
  • ISBN-13: 978-0275936778
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.8 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,397,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

?This excellent volume uses a comprehensive array of primary and secondary sources to paint a vivid portrait not only of this maverick of the Kriegsmarine but of a whole generation of German naval officers, especially U-boat veterans.?-Booklist

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In 1909, Imperial Germany stood at the pinnacle of its power. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "esford2" on 14 Dec 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book has been thoroughly researched and well written. Werner Henke was quite a colourful character of the U-Boat service; often having problems with authority.
He was however highly thought of by Admiral Donitz for his leadership abilities and mentioned by name in his own memoirs, for the Commanders brilliance.
The book lists Wenke's exploits, how he was captured and his death; after a breakout from a POW camp. The Book is well worth reading; and therefore value for money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "esford2" on 14 Dec 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book has been thoroughly researched and well written. Werner Henke was quite a colourful character of the U-Boat service; often having problems with authority.
He was however highly thought of by Admiral Donitz for his leadership abilities and mentioned by name in his own memoirs, for the Commanders brilliance.
The book lists Wenke's exploits, how he was captured and his death; after a breakout from a POW camp. The Book is well worth reading; and therefore value for money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A great accomplishment at bringing a clear picture of the German U-boat wars. 10 Feb 2007
By Douglas E. Libert - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
another truly great u-boat book that gives a studied approach to the WW2 submarine conflict and also downgrades Buchheim"s Das Boot as a true picture of a U-Boat crew.Buchheim describes the typical German u-boat sailor as so young that he terms their role in the submarine service as a "childrens crusade" however according to Mulligan's statistics this is not so.Also this book compares the different type of U-Boats-the niners and the sevens and gives their capacities and their shortcomings.The crews of these boats came mainly from cental and northern Germany,the more industrial regions which contradicts what i had previously read that these crews were from rural areas. Also there is an interesting chapter about the U-boat pecking order which makes absurdity of Buchheims,' Das Boot crews","we are one in suffering"mentality.The crews from this books' read seem like they would act as individuals guarding their own turf but can function as a team,indeed that would probably make for a more efficient crew as well as better for morale.You're going to love this book if you're into the Battle of the Atlantic,human interest stories mixed with some good statistics.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
I Loved the Book, If Not Henke! 30 Aug 2008
By John W. Dacey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"Lone Wolf" is a very interesting book, biography/history told in a compelling fashion! The author, Timothy Mulligan, is to be congratulated on the different focus which he puts on the upbringing of Kapitaenleutnant Werner Henke, a very successful, if not overly bright German Submarine Commander during the last big war (it was in all of the papers!). Mulligan Illustrates differences between Naval Academies in the USA and Germany, which are very clever weeding-out processes and pecking order heirarchies within particular submarines, I guess one can find "office politics" everywhere. There is also eye-opening material about the aspect of intelligence/espionage and propaganda as used by both sides in the "Battle of the Atlantic" Unfortunately, though not a Nazi by any stretch or use of the word, Henke was not without integrity which more than likely lead to his undoing! That and an innate gullibility led to his demise. It's a good book, though, not $120.00 good but you should read it if submarines are a vital part of your interest!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
book review 12 Nov 2013
By James Gill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
nice book, good story, if you like true stories as I do of a German not a Hitler gang member
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Fascinating & Innformative Book 27 April 2013
By A. Nathaniel Wallace, Jr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I remember first reading about Werner Henke in a Washington Post article more than 10 years ago. The article may have been a book review. Then, in 2003 while at Barnes & Noble I decided to purchase the book. I'm sorry to say that it took me so long to read it but I'm glad that I did. In the intervening years I've read Peter Cremer's autobiography, Wolfgang Luth's biography and a general U-Boat book called Germany's Last Mission To Japan, by Joe Scalia. This book by Timothy Mulligan is by far the best of all of them.

Timothy Mulligan's book is stellar because it has the advantage of being written 50 years after the events it describes, this allowing for major reflection. The book is littered with quotes and great anecdotes about the life and times of wener Henke, a remarkable man who fought for the wrong cause and unfortunately (For Him) was doomed from the beginning. Serving aboard a U-Boat was a death sentence as the statistics show. 757 U-Boats were sunk out of 1100 built during WWII. 70% of the U-Boaters died (28,000) while 5000 hapless souls were captured by the Allies. That most of his crew survived the war is a testament to Henke's skill and luck. Indeed, the top eight U-Boat aces all survived the war (Luth Survived His Last Patrol Only To be Slain By A Startled Sentry), including 10 of the top 12. I include Henke in this list because he survived to be captured and only died because of an escape attempt which was suicide by guard on his part. The fact that the majority of the best U-Boat captains survived until the end of the war was a testament to their knowledge, experience, guile, gall and luck. All these wer eneeded to survive against the oppressive might of the Allies.

That Henke was not an automaton says something of his character. On page 158-159 Mulligan describes Henke going to the office of Gauleiter Franz Hoffer of Austria Tyrol and dressing down the secretary for the treatment of a decent family at the hands of the Gestapo. This caused him problems and might have derailed his career had a war not been going on. Mulligan also details the one instance of a U-Boat captain firing on helpless refugees from a sunken vessel. Contrary to popular belief, the Germans did not gun down the helpless sailors in lifeboats. The scene in the movie U-571 is bogus for example. The primary sources and secondary sources bolster this book to a level I have seldom seen in a World War II biography. Page 170-171 wa salso fascinating. Oskar Kusch, commander of U-154's fate will be of great interest to those who realize that suppoort for Hitler was far from complete, even whithin the German military. I was frustrated, however, by Mulligan's refusal to name the officer who rated Kush out. It led me to believe that it was the man who subsequently took over command of U-154, but this wa snot the case. I had to find the name of the man from another U-Boat source and even then it is no corroborated in any other book of mine.

Mulligan should be congratulated for constructing a narrarrative that withstands the tests of time and showcases Werner Henke and his family and friends in every possible light possible. Henke was not perfect, but he was not a Nazi monster either. His sinking of the Ceramic was used against him by American interrogators, and as a result of this he feared he would be executed in a show trial in a British courtroom. This is what caused him to commit suicide by guard. Henke served his cause admirably, yet in the end, like all those who fought on the side of the Axis, he played out a losing hand. Yet Henke the officer deserved better. Unfortunately for him he did not live to see the end of the war. Germany could have used men like him in the rebuilding of the nation.

Buy this book and you will not be disappointed.

A. Nathaniel Wallace, Jr.
A very scholarly work that nicely brings together information from various sources about Werner Henke 27 Oct 2014
By Ronan Grew - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A very scholarly work that nicely brings together information from various sources about Werner Henke. I already knew much of his story but to have it all in one volume is an absolute bonus.

I have a particular interest in this U-Boat commander as he took my late father prisoner after the sinking of the SS Phemius off the west coast of Africa in December 1943 (pages 182-183).
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback