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Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass

2 customer reviews

Price: £13.03 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Product details

  • Orchestra: Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: George Lloyd
  • Composer: George Lloyd
  • Audio CD (1 Jun. 1994)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Albany Records
  • ASIN: B0000049N6
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,463 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Kyrie 8:38£0.99  Buy MP3 
  2. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Gloria12:05Album Only
  3. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Credo14:51Album Only
  4. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Offertorium 3:20£0.99  Buy MP3 
  5. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Sanctus and Benedictus12:56Album Only
  6. Lloyd: A Symphonic Mass: Agnus Dei 9:01£0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Description

TROY 100; TROY - Stati Uniti; Classica contemporanea operistica

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By The Boneman on 23 Jan. 2010
Format: Audio CD
George Lloyd's Symphonic Mass is stylistically about a century out of date. But - frankly - who cares when the music is as tuneful, appealing, and powerful as this? Built around a recurring Big Tune, this is the work of a master craftsman who cares not that his materials are old-fashioned, as long as he can make something beautiful out of them. Just pretend you're listening to something composed in the era of Elgar's "Dream of Gerontius" or Vaughan Williams' "Sea Symphony", sit back and enjoy!
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By John Dale on 11 Sept. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
George Lloyd had a fascinating career; he served in the Arctic Convoys and resumed composing relatively late in life. This Mass is a good example of his style and is well performed by the BSO - it loses a star because the sound balance seems rather poor on occasion.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A Great 20th Century Choral Masterpiece 20 Feb. 2010
By John Proffitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I believe this work to be one of the very greatest of 20th Century symphonic choral masterworks. In other words, it deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as William Walton's Belshazzar's Feast, Leos Janacek's Slavonic Mass, Dmitri Shostakovich's Babi Yar, Benjamin Britten's War Requiem, Franz Schmidt's Book with Seven Seals, Edward Elgar's Dream of Gerontius, Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 8, Schoenberg's Gurrelieder and so on. Why it is not better known is a great mystery.

The Symphonic Mass is big (lasting about an hour), bold and full of hummable tunes that will stick in your mind for a long time, and not one note wasted. It is also heartfelt, from a composer nearing the end of his life and attempting -- successfully, in my opinion -- to reflect his own existential hopes, doubts and fears through the most expressive medium possible, resulting in incredibly powerful music. It is a shame that Lloyd's music never attained "fashionable" status among critics and conductors (with a few notable exceptions), and thus was rarely heard in the concert hall. But thanks in particular to the work of two companies -- Lyrita of the UK and Albany Records of the USA -- most of Lloyd's orchestral output can be heard in excellent recorded performances, many conducted by the composer himself.

In many ways, this is Lloyd's "Symphony No. 13" -- no soloists, but full chorus throughout. The performers are the Brighton Festival Chorus and the Bournemouth Symphony, all conducted by the composer (who not incidentally was a superb conductor and interpreter of his own music), and all of whom sing or play their collective hearts out, in very obvious joy at discovering this magnificent music. Among Lloyd's instrumental symphonies, No. 4 and No. 5 stand out for me, but the Symphonic Mass is the finest of all. Truly the crowning work of this man's life. Do not miss it.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Knock your socks off! 12 Dec. 2004
By Sean W. Oslin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
What a great piece! Big, bombastic, beautiful. If you miss the 19th century (musically that is), this is the mass for you. Buy it. Enjoy it. And convince your local orchestra to perform it. The audience will thank you.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Buy this, get choirs to sing it! 27 Feb. 2011
By Alan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This marvellous work deserves to be sung on all continents. I am not sure if it has been performed in Australia - but choirs and orchestras and audiences would I am sure find it to be a rewarding experience. The great tune that permeates this work, the humanity that shines through every bar, the warmth of spirit, it is music that lifts the soul! Written only a few years before George Lloyd died, and first performed in 1993, when he was eighty years old, it is a legacy anyone would be proud of.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A superb work 19 Oct. 2014
By G.D. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
George Lloyd remained on the side of the musical establishment for most of his life, and continued to compose a long row of works in a defiantly tonal, melodic and romantic manner – but although his works sound as if they could have been written fifty years before or more, they also sound rather immediately like George Lloyd. In other words, though very conservative in terms of harmony and colors, his music also exhibits an individual character, and not the least great imagination, beautiful themes and a good sense of narrative structure; indeed, his best works, such as the fourth symphony, probably merit the “masterpiece” epithet. Presumably for that reason Lloyd managed, finally, to achieve some recognition and attention toward the end of his life, and responded by producing quite a number of substantial works, some of which, it has to be said, exhibit a certain amount of note spinning and dearth of genuine inspiration.

The Symphonic Mass is a later work, first performed in 1993, but does certainly not exhibit any trace of flagging imagination; indeed, it is a magnificent work of tremendous power, buoyance, brilliance and color. Described as “non-liturgical” by the composer the work, while setting the usual mass text, make some initially surprising choices – the Gloria movement is overall very reflective, with glittering textures and a prevailing sense of mystery, the Credo movement seems to be full of doubt, and the final Agnus Dei movement is unusually intense and assertive. More importantly, the work is full of splendid material, treated with intelligence, ingenuity and imagination. As a matter of fact, it strikes me as one of the most impressive choral-and-orchestral works from the latter part of the twentieth century I know of.

The performance is excellent; the Brighton Festival Chorus sing their hearts out when needed, but provides all the variety of texture and color one could dream of (there are no soloists), and the Bournemouth Symphony under the composer turns in some first-rate playing with plenty of energy, drama, atmosphere and momentum. They are captured in warm, broad, vivid sound. A treasurable release, then – I would perhaps still look to the fourth symphony as the ideal introduction to the composer, but this is a great work, strongly recommended.
Truly Rewarding Music 26 Mar. 2015
By Swedish classical music lover - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Standard classical music repertoire seems to be stalled in the 1940s, the last decade of standby works like Shostakovitch's 7th and 8th symphonies, Copland's Appalachian Spring, Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra, and perhaps a few others. Composed in the early 1990s, George Lloyd's Symphonic Mass, clocking in at around 60 minutes, is one of those after intermission works that will faithfully bring out the crowds if we can break through the 1940s classical music finish line. Think of a program that looks something like this:

Richard Wagner: Overture
Camille Saint-Saens: Piano Concerto
George Lloyd (1913-1998): Symphonic Mass

Two generic, common, well-loved type of works, and then, this, a symphonic mass that takes up the entirety of the second half of the program, the obvious feature, a 20th century work that smacks of no atonality or raw dissonance but something grandiose.

This is, in essence, Lloyd's final grand work, his 13th symphony you could say, in the vein of Beethoven's 9th. A number of 20th century composers ended their careers with experimentation, moving away from the overly appealing, unique, and approachable style that brought them fame. Not so for George Lloyd. This Symphonic Mass is the culmination of a career of tonal, melodic, and colorful use of the orchestra. This is the kind of music that you think you have heard before--it is so memorable and emotionally effective--but cannot recall where; you are just glad you've run across it again on a recording to keep. The opening of the Gloria is about as close to anything I've heard accurately depicting the heavenly realm, and alternates between feelings of final, eternal resolution and the moments recalling the difficulty path to this point. Other movements similarly capture the human soul. Even the relatively simple Offertorium, a three minute interlude, is profoundly affirming.

This is rewarding music that demands the listener's attention, in the grand and subtle moments. It is music that cannot be relegated to the background.

It must be that the work is too recent that orchestras have not picked it up, too expensive to play, too many musicians. This work will have its day. It stands alongside other 20th century tonal composers in America, Britain, and Sweden that have been coming to the fore in recent years.
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