Living a Life that Matters and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£9.31
  • RRP: £10.20
  • You Save: £0.89 (9%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Usually dispatched within 1 to 3 weeks.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Living a Life That Matter... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Living a Life That Matters: Resolving the Conflict Between Conscience and Success Audio Cassette – Audiobook, 12 Apr 2002


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Cassette, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£9.31
£1.60 £0.50

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Download your favourite books to your ipod or mp3 player and save up to 80% on more than 40,000 titles at Audible.co.uk.





Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio Books (12 April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 140500102X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405001021
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 10.8 x 3.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,430,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"A valuable companion . . . a set of guideposts for living a useful and fulfilled life, no matter what the future holds." "--The Boston Globe ""A wonderful, much-needed primer on the truly important things in life. Many thanks to Harold Kushner for reminding us what we should never forget." --Mitch Albom, author of "Tuesdays With Morrie ""Full ofEgreat stories and subtle wisdom....This is a book you don't want to put down or allow to be too far from you in times of crisis." --Thomas Moore, author of "Care of the Soul " --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

In this inspiring, uplifting and timely book, Harold Kushner addresses our craving for significance, the need to know that our lives and choices mean something. We sometimes confuse power, wealth and fame with true achievement. We can do great things, and occasionally terrible things, to reassure ourselves that we matter to the world. We need to think of ourselves as good people and are troubled when we compromise our integrity to be successful and important.Rabbi Kushner suggests that the path to a truly successful and significant life lies in friendship, family, acts of generosity and self-sacrifice, as well as in God's forgiving nature. He describes how, in changing the life of even one person in a positive way, we make a difference in the world, give our lives meaning, and prove that we do, in fact, matter. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 July 2004
Format: Paperback
Rabbi Kushner has woven a fascinating series of essays together to establish a new way to think about the meaningfulness of your life choices. Spiritually, he finds many people torn between the desire to achieve significance and the call of the consciences. Like the young Jacob, some will obtain their desires by cutting corners that offend their consciences.
Drawing on his many years as a rabbi, he shares what he has learned at many death beds. Few people are concerned about dying. Those who have done good things in their lives are almost always at peace. Those who regret the timing of their deaths wish for a little more time, so that they might yet leave some marks of goodness behind them. From that perspective, he gently points out that we can achieve both the significance and the clear conscience that we crave by focusing our attention on have positive influences on others in supporting roles as family member, friend, and occasional helping hand to strangers. The move, It's a Wonderful Life, is used as an example. The Jimmy Stewart character doesn't realize how all the little things he did affected so many lives, which in turn affected so many other lives. We, too, tend to be blind to the potential influence we have.
The book has a kindness and gentleness that make its message welcome and warming.
In chapter one, the subject is the two voices of God. This essay considers the models of competition with others and our heart-felt desire to share compassion, and how the two often operate at odds with one another in young people. He ascribes the competition to a desire for significance, that many psychologists would echo as a deep human need.
In chapter two, the story of Jacob's transformation from trickster to being firmly founded in God's will is featured.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terl Bryant on 29 July 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A valuable an insightful book encouraging the reader to recognise that when we allow 'love' to conquer us, we no longer need to resort to our human default of winning by finding and exploiting others weaknesses. HK shows us that investment in 'love' is what really gives us significance and allows us to shape history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Molmont Bailey on 22 Nov 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A book of hope
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 67 reviews
69 of 69 people found the following review helpful
The Personal and Social Significance of Doing Good 6 Sep 2001
By Donald Mitchell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Rabbi Kushner has woven a fascinating series of essays together to establish a new way to think about the meaningfulness of your life choices. Spiritually, he finds many people torn between the desire to achieve significance and the call of the consciences. Like the young Jacob, some will obtain their desires by cutting corners that offend their consciences.
Drawing on his many years as a rabbi, he shares what he has learned at many death beds. Few people are concerned about dying. Those who have done good things in their lives are almost always at peace. Those who regret the timing of their deaths wish for a little more time, so that they might yet leave some marks of goodness behind them. From that perspective, he gently points out that we can achieve both the significance and the clear conscience that we crave by focusing our attention on have positive influences on others in supporting roles as family member, friend, and occasional helping hand to strangers. The move, It's a Wonderful Life, is used as an example. The Jimmy Stewart character doesn't realize how all the little things he did affected so many lives, which in turn affected so many other lives. We, too, tend to be blind to the potential influence we have.
The book has a kindness and gentleness that make its message welcome and warming. "I believe in you. I believe that you have the ability to do great things, things that will change the world for the better." I share that belief and am delighted that Rabbi Kushner has written this book.
In chapter one, the subject is the two voices of God. This essay considers the models of competition with others and our heart-felt desire to share compassion, and how the two often operate at odds with one another in young people. He ascribes the competition to a desire for significance, that many psychologists would echo as a deep human need.
In chapter two, the story of Jacob's transformation from trickster to being firmly founded in God's will is featured. I especially liked the way that the pain of winning by trickery and being tricked in turn by Laban probably affected how Jacob felt about himself.
In chapter three, you are encouraged to decide what kind of person you want to be. Rather than ask all to seek perfection in sainthood, he argues for a mixture of human competitiveness and compassion that allows us to strive and to care. This chapter includes interesting references to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and an episode of the original Star Trek series in which Kirk is divided into a good and a bad version by a transporter problem.
In chapter four, there is an interesting discussion of the psychological impacts of justice from the point of view of those who are harmed. The experience of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission is recounted along with a new type of trial in the United States where attempts are made to improve how the victims and their families feel.
In chapter five, you will learn about how wholeness (personal integrity) can be achieved. The primary example is that of Mr. Aaron Feuerstein, CEO of Malden Mills, who rebuilt his factory after a disastrous fire while keeping his employees on full salary for the first three months.
In chapter six, the key concept is that God's presence is manifested on Earth in our relations with those we love, both family and friends.
Chapter seven explores the notion of how supporting roles have big impacts too. Most of us can have these roles. If we were movie actors, we could even get an Academy award for doing this well.
Chapter eight is a thoughtful discussion of our influence on other people. I particularly liked the reference to The Bridge of San Luis Rey, and how all those who died had recently learned how to love. Young people often write to me to find out the theme of that book, and don't understand it even after lots of hints about what those who died had in common. Perhaps you have to know human love beyond your family before that message can become part of your heart.
The book ends on this note from the Talmud. "A good person, even in death, is still alive." That quote means to me that our impact is carried on in the reality and memories of those we have touched who are still alive.
Although Rabbi Kushner is obviously of the Jewish faith, he is remarkably ecumenical in his ability to reflect the perspectives of many religious and nonreligious beliefs and traditions. He has a practical bent that I appreciate, as well. For example, he points out that teens who are feeling out of sorts often respond well to taking on community service roles. That too has been my observation,
After you finish reading this rewarding book, think about how you could combine things you enjoy doing with having a more positive influence on others. For example, even if all you do is watch television, you could go watch television with people who have no one to keep them company.
Be significant in the goodness you create by following your conscience!
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
Another solid effort from the gentle rabbi... 22 Sep 2002
By Alex Nichols, author of Shadow Rock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Few authors writing today offer the kind of comfort that Harold Kushner does. In all of his books, including his latest "Living a Life that Matters," he deals with the big issues in life, and does it in a simple writing style that manages to be both profound and soothing.
Like his readers, Kushner lives in a dual world: a world of commerce and competition, and a world where he desires to be a good person, and feels guilt when he isn't. How does a person integrate these two worlds? As in his other books, Kushner draws on biblical stories that illustrate the universal and timeless nature of this conflict. In Genesis, Jacob is a character at first wily and ambitious (he steals his brother's birthright, among other things) but also a character who has the famous wrestle with an angel. Kushner sees this image as being a perfect symbol of man's struggle with his dual nature. Throughout the book he returns to his struggle of duality, which he believes is inherant to human nature. We all desire to be good, while needing our competitive side to survive in this world. Kushner encourages that balance between the two is key to living a life that matters.
With that resolved, Kushner delves into why life has meaning in spite of our nature. He believes, as do many religious people, that every life has value to God, and even the smallest decisions we make can affect others' lives for the good. There is a nice sentiment to his spirituality, and he is gifted at handling broad topics with grace --he references sources as diverse as the Old Testement, the movie "Witness," and the Jeckyll and Hyde story to illustrate his points, and does it without seeming heavy handed or moralizing. Somehow religion makes sense when Kushner explains it -- even something as baffling as eating kosher makes perfect sense when he is done explaining it.
I've enjoyed all of Rabbi Kushner's books. This one is on par with the rest -- graceful, moving and impactful.
37 of 41 people found the following review helpful
LIVING A LIFE OF LOVE AND COMPASSION! 3 Oct 2001
By Sandra D. Peters - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Living a life that matters can be easily translated into living a life of love and compassion for one's fellow man. As a result of the terrible tragedy in New York City on September 11th, there are many people searching for answers to life's meaning, and asking why...why this senseless tragegy? The unexplained mysteries of life, however tragic, are often attributed to the fact that the universe is unfolding as fate intended and that all things happen for a reason. Somtimes, it is very difficult to find "good reason" in such a time of horror. Tragedy has a way of bringing people together in time of need, and hopefully from that we find strength, understanding and love for humanity. Through all of this we struggle to find spiritual and emotional peace within ourselves and while "Living a Life That Matters" does not have all the answers, it is a book which instills goodness, understanding and compassion within us. The book helps us to see that revenge and quest for power are destructive, that material gain is really very insignificant in life's overall plan, and that love, kindness, compassion and personal strength enrich our lives a thousand times over. Each and every person we reach out to touch leaves a mark on the world and in our hearts.
Harold S. Kushner has written a book that causes the reader to look deep within themselves and decide for themselves just what kind of person they truly want to be. Chapter eight was my favourite part of the book as it points out the influence we have on others. Each and every chapter reveals an important message to us so that we may do our part in making the world a better place and, by doing so, finding solice and peace within ourselves.
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
A book that truly matters 5 Jun 2002
By Three Crows - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In my years of ministry, I have held the hand of many dying persons. And you know what? Never has one said "I wish I had spent more time at work", or "My life would have been complete if I had got that promotion." Nope. They talk about words of love unsaid, words of anger they wish they could unsay, time that should have been spent with their kids and family that they wasted on chasing an ephemeral ideal of 'success'.
In Living a Life that Matters, Kushner has given us a timely examination of why it is that so many in our culture spend their valuable time striving for a culturally defined success that doesn't really matter, and how to reevaluate and reorient for a meaningful life. Kushner's wonderful stories and examples, as well as clear entertaining writing make this a gem. It's easy to read, and as deep as the night sky.
If you are a person with an unsettled feeling in your soul, wondering what your life really means after all, Kushner's book is a great place to start looking for answers.
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Poignant 28 Sep 2003
By Liora Hess - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Kushner has written another wonderful book with piercing insights into what life is about and what makes a life matter. He uses the story of Jacob throughout to illustrate his points. Kushner discusses topics of revenge, and what is more satisfying than getting even. I thought this paragraph by the author really eloquent in showing the difference between religious people and Godly people regarding prophecy:
"If the words you speak are hard for you to utter and hard for others to hear, if you get no pleasure from speaking them but you feel you must, then you can believe that they come from God. On the other hand, if your words make you popular and win you easy applause, or if people don't like hearing them but you get a certain pleasure from speaking them...then you may have reason to suspect that those are your own thoughts disguising themselves as the Word of God. When I hear politicians and preachers condemning the sinful ways of the society around them, I often agree with their criticisms but I don't hear the pain in their voices. It ought to hurt them more to condemn their neighbors..."
This is so eloquent and so true. It shows that there's definitely something wrong when one sees religious people condemning others to hell or some horrible fate and not showing sadness or grief about it.
Harold Kushner covers so much ground in his book, so many topics, as to what really matters. So much of it he describes as love - loving others, making a difference in people's lives, making others' lives easier. All of these things make a life that matters.
But one of my favorite sections of the book was the afterward, added after the book had been out for a while. This book was originally published a week before the September 11, 2001, attacks in the USA. The author added an afterward that really spoke to my heart. It is very similar in tone to his book, "When Bad Things Happen to Good People." I found it to be very comforting and offer new insights on the attacks, the families who were directly affected, why God allowed them to happen, and more.
A very uplifting, very inspiring book well worth adding to your library or at least checking out from the library.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback