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LiveCode Mobile Development Beginner's Guide [Kindle Edition]

Colin Holgate
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Print List Price: £27.99
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Book Description

This book will follow a tutorial style, starting from basic LiveCode coding concepts to its real-world implementation. It will teach developers how to use this new framework to develop interactive, cross-platform mobile applications. If you are a developer, consultant or student looking to create fast, scalable mobile applications, then this book is for you. Basic knowledge of programming such as understanding variables, expressions, control structures and functions is required.


Product Description

About the Author

Colin Holgate

Colin Holgate was originally trained as a telecommunications technician in the Royal Air Force, but with the advent of the personal computer era he transitioned to working as a technical support engineer for companies that included Apple Computer UK. In 1992 he moved to the USA, to become a full time multimedia programmer, working for The Voyager Company. In that role he programmed several award winning CD-ROMs, including A Hard Day's Night and This Is Spinal Tap. For the last 12 years Colin has worked for Funny Garbage, a New York City based web design company. In addition to using Adobe Director and Adobe Flash for online and kiosk application, he has used LiveCode for in-house production tools. At the introduction of LiveCode for Mobile at the RunRevLive Conference in 2011, Colin entered, and won a contest to create a mobile application made with LiveCode.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5056 KB
  • Print Length: 246 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (26 July 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008Q7H84A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #413,026 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars unified development for iOS and Android 23 Aug. 2012
Format:Paperback
LiveCode has an interesting pedigree. The book traces its intellectual antecedent to Apple's HyperCard in 1987. Before the Web was born, HyperCard got good reviews as an instantiation of a hypertext language. Today's LiveCode has much more, of course, but you should be aware of its long roots in this field.

The text shows a very simple and intuitive GUI, from which you can make quick applications. The building of a given front end is achieved by dragging icons [or widgets] from a palette onto the main Stack window. This dragging of widgets has long been successfully used in other graphical tools like those for VLSI design.

Another metaphor for GUI development is the stack of cards. Again, a very straightforward idea. For an experienced developer [you, presumably], another quick uptake.

Of course, a major attraction of LiveCode is that it provides a unified SDK for Apple iOS and Google Android. Quite possibly for some readers, this will be the decisive factor in using LiveCode. Simply having to only do one code thread that spans these mobile platforms is an immense saving in effort. You can see that LiveCode can use native OS controls, so that the precise instantiation of your LiveCode program might indeed take 2 different looks. But the functionality should and usually will remain the same.

Going further into the text, the example in chapter 6 that uses the phone's location is a useful guide to how to access advanced features of many new phones. Location is a fundamental input into many applications, and you might want to peruse this chapter's example carefully.
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Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book For The Beginner, Great Book For The Intermediate Programmers 22 Nov. 2012
By by Richard MacLemale - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
As an Intermediate LiveCode programmer who has already put two apps in the App Store, I wasn't sure what to expect from this book - would it be too basic for me to learn anything? Would it offer any insight into how I can streamline my own process for getting my apps into the store? And the answers were no and yes - no, it was not too basic, and yes, I am finding that the book has a lot of great information that I didn't know.

One thing I would do is caution beginners - the book eases you into LiveCode, but it starts to ramp up and gets into some fairly advanced concepts - might be difficult for a beginner, but it's perfect for the intermediate programmers like me.

My biggest problem is impatience - I want to jump right in and grab a few nuggets of knowledge, but this book really requires a more structured study. I have no doubt I'll get a lot more out of it when I take the time to really go through it.

Summary - For beginners to LiveCode who want to make iOS and/or Android apps, it's a good book, but you might find the later chapters moderately challenging (which is NOT a bad thing.) For intermediate LiveCode programmers, you'll probably learn some nice tricks of the trade.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent guide to developing mobile apps with LiveCode 9 Oct. 2012
By Jim M - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I generally have a hard time with programming books. They are either too broadly focused and as a result never give enough truly useful information or they are so narrowly focused they are only useful if one is trying to solve exactly the problem the book is focusing on. When I agreed to review this book (in return for a copy), I expected to find it on one side or the other of that spectrum. I was very pleasantly surprised. Simply put,this book is not like that. The author has done an excellent job covering a very broad and potentially complex subject in enough detail to be useful without getting bogged down in minutiae.

Using practical examples of apps that one can actually see as being useful, the author provides both the general background and detailed coding examples to get you started coding with LiveCode and actually get your apps up and out the door on Android and iOS devices. The first part of the book provides a compact introduction to LiveCode geared towards those with some previous experience in Xtalk-like languages (HyperCard, SuperCard, MetaCard, etc). The intro may be a little too compact for non-programmers but the natural language character of LiveCode makes it less daunting and LiveCode's flexibility makes it well worth the effort.

Once through the familiarization section, the book takes off into the nuts and bolts of coding for mobile devices with LiveCode. The details are dealt with in a clear, concise manner with none of the common "fill in the missing pieces of code" parts that plague many other books. It focuses on three key apps: a web page data extractor (great for demonstrating internet connectivity and text handling), a jigsaw puzzle app (great for working with graphics) and a reminder app (great for working with time, location and notification features expected from today's apps). Once those are done, the book addresses how to get your app out of the development environment (i.e. stuck on your personal device) and into the real world including how to distribute to beta testers and app marketplaces.

The only significant issue I have with the book is that it addresses the challenges of graphic controls for mobile devices (and in particular the iOS devices) with a tool called MobGui which is not a part of LiveCode. I'm not sure a LiveCode for Beginners book should rely so heavily on an extra tool that one must pay for. In addition, MobGui appears not been updated in quite a while and may not be the best choice for the task at hand. That said, using MobGui for the interface elements does allow the author to move beyond the frustrating subject of building controls and geometry management for mobile devices and on to the more important (in my mind) details of coding in LiveCode... the official subject of the book.

All in all I believe this is an excellent book (and the only one!) for learning how easy it is to develop and deploy mobile apps using LiveCode
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I like this 9 Aug. 2012
By G. Feamster - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've been programming for 30 years and tend to think in technical forms. So Livecode was a bit of a problem for me in that it veers away from the very technical and makes language syntax more layman oriented. I went through the video tutorials which are very good but until I read this book I didn't realize that there were holes in my knowledge and this fills those holes. There are good screen shots and using the kindle edition is economical and convenient with the kindle app on my nexus 7 tablet. Also there are weblinks that would encourage the use of the desktop kindle app on my mac.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Easy To Follow 22 Aug. 2013
By Phil Parker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is a great book that is so easy to follow & explains each step simply enough for a beginner.

The LiveCode website is a great place to learn & there are lots of lessons there but I feel this book was better for anyone starting out.
4.0 out of 5 stars unified development for iOS and Android 23 Aug. 2012
By W Boudville - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
LiveCode has an interesting pedigree. The book traces its intellectual antecedent to Apple's HyperCard in 1987. Before the Web was born, HyperCard got good reviews as an instantiation of a hypertext language. Today's LiveCode has much more, of course, but you should be aware of its long roots in this field.

The text shows a very simple and intuitive GUI, from which you can make quick applications. The building of a given front end is achieved by dragging icons [or widgets] from a palette onto the main Stack window. This dragging of widgets has long been successfully used in other graphical tools like those for VLSI design.

Another metaphor for GUI development is the stack of cards. Again, a very straightforward idea. For an experienced developer [you, presumably], another quick uptake.

Of course, a major attraction of LiveCode is that it provides a unified SDK for Apple iOS and Google Android. Quite possibly for some readers, this will be the decisive factor in using LiveCode. Simply having to only do one code thread that spans these mobile platforms is an immense saving in effort. You can see that LiveCode can use native OS controls, so that the precise instantiation of your LiveCode program might indeed take 2 different looks. But the functionality should and usually will remain the same.

Going further into the text, the example in chapter 6 that uses the phone's location is a useful guide to how to access advanced features of many new phones. Location is a fundamental input into many applications, and you might want to peruse this chapter's example carefully.
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