Live
 
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Live

13 July 2009 | Format: MP3

£5.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:02
30
2
5:45
30
3
4:38
30
4
3:52
30
5
5:44
30
6
3:24
30
7
3:13
30
8
3:43
30
9
8:07
30
10
3:33


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 13 July 2009
  • Label: Carinco Neue Medien AG
  • Copyright: (c) 2009 Carinco Neue Medien AG
  • Total Length: 49:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002HSGCNW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 81,216 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By freewheeling frankie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
I've never quite understood why this album has been separated from Volume 2, given they were originally two discs of a double lp, but it does at least mean you can buy the better half separately.

Both CDs contain material recorded over a series of concerts in San Francisco in late November/early December 1969 (the majority) with a few tracks from a concert in Dallas a few weeks earlier. But the sound quality from the two sources is so similar that it sounds as if it could all have come from one night.

Waiting For The Man, preceded by a marvellous spoken intro by Lou Reed, opened the Dallas concert and presents a radically different arrangement from the studio version, starting off with an almost country feel before rocking out convincingly. Lisa Says first appeared on Reed's debut solo album, but both that and a Velvets studio version unissued at the time are deeply inferior to this, one of their greatest performances featuring a superb lyric on the vagaries of shyness and sexual attraction. What Goes On features a relentlessly fast rhythm guitar and amazing organ mangling from new boy Doug Yule before they stop dead after nearly 9 minutes of bliss. Sweet Jane is a superb slow, gentle version, as good as any they ever did. We're Gonna Have A Real Good Time Together does exactly what it says on the tin - no irony at all. Femme Fatale features another fabulous spoken intro, and hardly suffers the lack of Nico's vocal. New Age, with Reed on vocals instead of Doug Yule, is hugely superior to the Loaded version and has a better lyric. Rock'n'Roll and Beginning To See The Light slightly improve on superb studio versions and the only slight lapse in quality is the bonus version of Heroin - and even that's pretty good.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Tomlinson on 5 July 2008
Format: Audio CD
I can only chime in with the previous reviews, this is a fantastic record well worth buying both volumes for the charm of some of the more obscure songs. I would add that the version of Sweet Jane was supposedly performed on the day it was written, which may well explain its naivety and beauty.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Og Oggilby VINE VOICE on 20 Nov 2009
Format: Audio CD
This album originally came out as a double vinyl set - I've actually got a Japanese import CD version of this, which re-aligns it as a double CD set in a nice mini repro of the original double vinyl gatefold sleeve. Anyway, there is no way in which you should buy this CD and not its other half; they're essential purchases. When the album was first released, way back in the mid 1970s, its sleeve note writer, singer-songwriter Elliot Murphy was supposedly going to be 'The Next Big Thing'. It didn't happen for Elliot, but he was right about theses recordings. Songs like 'Ocean' and 'Sweet Bonnie Brown' / 'It's Just Too Much' were previously unreleased (at least not officially), and the versions of 'Sweet Jane' and 'New Age' were radically different lyrically than how they'd turn out on 'Loaded'. Although both Nico and John Cale were no longer with the band, leaving Lou Reed as their increasingly autocratic leader, this line-up pack an incredible sonic punch. The version of 'What Goes On' is remorselessly intense, whilst Lou Reed's conversational song introductions reveal a sense of humour that he's managed to submerge for decades since. Sure, the sound quality is not great, but the performances and song selection cannot be faulted. Plus, this much good music for under a tenner is fabulous value for money.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By J. Patterson on 13 Oct 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When Paul Morley -- later of Art of Noise -- reviewed this for NME many years ago he more or less declared that it was the greatest rock album ever released. With the exception of Sister Ray what you have on volumes 1 and 2 together are the best versions of the Velvets' best songs, without any arty-farty messing about, and with splendid singing from Lou Reed and magnificent guitar playing from Sterling Morrison: listen to his solo on White Light, White Heat and witness a rival to Neil Young and Tom Verlaine. Finally, the sound is marvellously appropriate to the music: what it lacks in clinical polish it more than makes up for in ambience.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 17 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD
This 1974 release of excerpts of The Velvet Underground's live performances in Dallas and San Francisco in 1969 is truly the stuff of legend. Admittedly, this was the incarnation of the band minus John Cale, but frankly, you only need listen to Doug Yule's astonishing keyboard work on the brilliant What Goes On to realise that this band line-up had lost none of its inspiration. The other thing to note about the CD release of what was previously a vinyl double album is that it has been divided into two. For me, this Volume 1 is the strongest half of the complete recording (just by virtue of the strength of the songs), although Volume 2 also makes up another excellent album, and together the two volumes represent my favourite live Velvets album (albeit both the Live At Max's Kansas City and The Quine Tapes recordings should also be must-haves for band aficionados).

Volume 1 opens with a nice bit of banter between Lou Reed and his live Dallas audience, before the band launch into an almost countrified version of Waiting For My Man (interestingly, renamed - to reflect the actual lyrics - from its original studio and live version name of I'm Waiting For The Man) - amazingly, this version of the song is just as memorable as the trademark heavier studio version, with Reed and Morrison's guitars sounding particularly lyrical and resonant, serving to reinforce my view that this song is one of the band's greatest ever. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is no weak moment on 1969,with all 10 songs demonstrating variations from their studio versions, perhaps most obviously in Sweet Jane and Heroin, and also great takes of Lisa Says (particularly), Femme Fatale and New Age.
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