The Little Women Letters and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Little Women Letters has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Little Women Letters Paperback – 26 May 2011


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.99
£1.39 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

The Little Women Letters + Code Name Verity
Price For Both: £11.99

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph (26 May 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718156587
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718156589
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 337,766 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gabrielle Donnelly was born and brought up in London, where she made a living as a magazine journalist before moving to Los Angeles to specialise in show business journalism, while writing novels on the side. She lives near the ocean with her husband, Owen Bjornstad, in a spectacularly untidy house where they make each other laugh a very great deal. You can learn more by visiting her website at www.gabrielledonnellyauthor.com.

Product Description

Review

"Donnelly's "The Little Women Letters" imagines how modern versions of the March sisters might have lived. . . . Donnelly writes with obvious passion for the classic take and successfully applies a fresh sensibility to the three modern sisters. Nostalgic without being deferential, jocular without being flippant...Beautifully crafted." --"Booklist"

About the Author

Gabrielle Donnelly was born and brought up in London, where she worked as a journalist on women's magazines before moving to Los Angeles to specialize in show business journalism. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, and has been an ardent fan of Louisa May Alcott since she was a young girl.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By finalguy on 13 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Lulu is the middle sister of the Atwater family. Her older sister Emma is planning for her wedding, and her younger sister Sophie is pursuing an acting career on the stage, so she can't help that she is the failure of the family, not sure what to do with herself. She's working dead-end jobs and has no romantic prospects. But then, as she is looking through the attic for some old family recipes, she finds a collection of letters written by her great-great-grandmother Josephine March. "In her letters, Jo writes in detail about every aspect of her life: her older sister, Meg's new home and family; her younger sister Amy's many admirers; Beth's illness and the family's shared grief over losing her too soon; and the butterflies she feels when she meets a handsome young German. As Lulu delves deeper into the lives and secrets of the March sisters, she finds solace and guidance, but can the words of her great-great-grandmother help Lulu find a place for herself in a world so different from the one Jo knew?"

The tie-in to Little Women was good in this one, but it also stands well alone as its own story about a young woman trying to find herself. I like Little Women a lot, though I haven't reread it recently, so I got most of the references. Sometimes, however, Lulu could be a bit too nasty to her sisters, borderline taunting rather than teasing. However, The Little Women Letters is an amusing read, I would almost say a beach read, even though I read it in the fall. But it's the kind of book best for a sunny afternoon or two.

The book doesn't just focus on Lulu though; it also focuses on Emma and Sophie's lives and complications, as well as their parents and Charlie, Lulu's friend. This one kind of reminded me of The Weird Sisters, but I think it was much better. At least, the subject was more interesting to me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By ruthe on 11 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a delightful book, connecting the three Atwater sisters living in London in the 21st century with the March family living just outside Boston in the the 19th century, as described by Louisa May Alcott in Little Women. Letters written by Jo March provide a comfort and inspiration to Lulu, the middle Atwater sister, who is strugling to find her role in life. I really liked the Atwater family, especially the girls' mother, Fee, and loved revisiting the story of Jo, Meg and Amy March through Jo's letters. Gabrielle Donnelly's interweaving of the stories of the two families is terrific.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I wavered between a 4 and a 4.5 when I finished reading this book. My main reason for wanting to deduct stars is just because I didn't feel entirely satisfied with the man that Lulu ended up with at the end of the novel. Partly because I just liked the first love interest more, but mainly just because I didn't feel like I had enough time to witness the romance between Lulu and the second love interest develop. But perhaps this is the way the romance between Jo and Fritz occurs in 'Little Women'? It's been a while since I read the original. I also got a little bit annoyed at Emma's behaviour, but I did come to like her more towards the end of the novel. I liked her growth of character, even if it took me a while to warm up to her. Sophie was brilliant, I think the author perfectly captured the manner of speech that so many young female university graduates in England have. That said, she may be a little caricatured and not so relatable, but she was still a lot of fun.

As for the 'Little Women' parallels, I picked up on so many. Perhaps I even read some parallels into the novel that weren't intentional. Even so, I loved them. I was also immensely impressed by how the author perfectly captured Jo's voice. Absolutely perfect! It was like discovering scenes that the author had cut from the final draft of 'Little Women'. So I think this book has two audiences: standard chick-lit fans and those who wish Louisa May Alcott had written more about the March sisters.

Ultimately, I'm settling on a 4.5 for this book as, despite my slight disappointment with Lulu's choice of boyfriend at the end of the novel, I did truly love this book and am immensely impressed with how the author presented the legacy of the March family and captured Jo's voice.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ann Gorman on 7 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover
I thought it would be a book that I would love or even like but to be honest I find the story weak and really struggled to keep reading, I hoped that maybe the end would make up for the lack of direction, I felt there wasn't passion in the writing and overall found it a bit boring. 'Little Women' I like, I enjoyed, this isn't a book to compare to it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By SFB on 10 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback
I loved this book. The modern day characters develop vivid personalities as the book progresses and the references back to the March sisters enrich the narrative and give Lulu and her sisters a tangible heritage that seems oddly relevant. With lots of gentle humour and an understanding of sibling dynamics Gabrielle guides us through a year in the lives of the Atwaters and I found myself strangely immersed in the everyday happenings of the family as if they were my own. The letters start out as a backdrop but as the book unfolds seem to have an influence that bridges the gap between generations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback