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Little Dorrit (BBC Radio Collection) Audio Cassette – Audiobook, 8 May 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 138 customer reviews

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Audio Cassette, Audiobook, 8 May 2001
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: BBC Books (8 May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 056347825X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563478256
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 10.6 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (138 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,343,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

One of the most glorious achievements of publishing in our time --The Daily Telegraph

It will never be more possible for a more complete and perfect edition to be put on the market --Arthur Waugh, Past President, Dickens Fellowship

It will never be more possible for a more complete and perfect edition to be put on the market --Arthur Waugh, Past President, Dickens Fellowship --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

A cutting satire of the shortcomings of Victorian society and widely regarded as one of Charles Dickens’s finest novels. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 May 2008
Format: Paperback
From its first publication in book form after the serialisation, Little Dorrit has always proved to be a good seller. So why has this book always been so popular? For whole segments Amy 'Little' Dorrit does not even appear. The novel covers so much more than the title implies.

Little Dorrit is born in the Marshalsea, where her father is imprisoned for debt. Eventually he is released at the end of book one, when he comes into an inheritance. For Mr Dorrit this leads to paranoia that people are talking behind his back or laughing at him due to his former poverty. Poor little Dorrit finds it difficult to change her ways and is still a ministering angel to all and sundry.

What really stands out in this book are the locations, as the story travels from London through France, Switzerland and Italy. This is the most widespread geographically of any of Dickens' novels. Also this book probably has the most sub-plots of any Dickens novel, with mention of murder and smuggling, to actual acts of corruption and suicide, to love, marriages and death. Mrs Clennam tries to keep a family secret buried but is being blackmailed, and is her house haunted or is there a more rational explanation?

As to be expected with Dickens there are some great characters and some good comedy. Anyone who has ever had any dealings with govermental departments can really appreciate the Circumloction Office, and its practices. A few of the illustrations in this book are some of the very best to appear in any of his novels.

This is a must read book, that with so many things going on throughout will keep you absorbed for hours, and that you will want to read again.
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Format: Audio CD
A vivid and detailed tale of Victorian England, which has many similarities to present day Britain. A really masterful story by Charles Dickens, graphically narrated by Anton Lesson, another master of his profession. It has more than 10 hours of story, ideal for a long car journey or enlightening another pile of ironing or a long winter's evening. We wholeheartedly recommend it.
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By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 26 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback
This is prime Dickens, so must merit five stars even if it is a novel which typifies the virtues of and failings of Dickens' maturity. A work clearly springing from the author's deepest fears and concerns, it is exceptionally diffuse and prolix, sufficient to provoke the despair of his admirers and the grim satisfaction of his (few) detractors. There is barely enough plot or incident to cover nearly eight hundred pages and some of the chapters where Dickens gives vent to his frustration with the interminable procrastination, otiose bureaucracy and ingrained tribal structure in the machineries of government and the Civil Service, are decidedly superfluous, for all their magnificent scorn; sometimes the author wears his satirical hat too long.

This is Dickens exorcising two demons: his engrained terror of debt and imprisonment, springing from his childhood experience as the child of Mr Micawber and his loathing for the self-serving Establishment. It is worth pointing out that the debtors' prisons had long been closed when this novel was written so this is not in any crude sense a "reform" novel but must be viewed more subtly as a work which exploits imprisonment as a metaphor, whereby many of the characters are "locked in" to a wretched existence and seek freedom and redemption.

As ever, the result is some immortal and fantastic creations: the Circumlocution Office is an institution to match the workings of Chancery - another institution which was in fact in the process of reforming itself just as the novel was being written - in "Bleak House". There is not perhaps the wealth of striking or comic characters one expects in a Dickens novel although many still approach the immortal.
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Format: Paperback
Little Dorrit is a prime example of Dickens' weighty descriptive style and his genius for observation and characterisation. It also, perhaps unusually for Dickens, has a semi-coherent story line.
The book chronicles the respective fortunes of the title heroine, a young women caring for her incarcerated father in the Marshalsea Prison, and Mr Arthur Clennam, a kindly businessman returned lately from the east, who becomes obsessed with the idea that his father was responsible for the Dorrit families woes. An entrie host of characters, good and bad, amusing and obnoxious, accompany the main protagonists on their mysteriously intertwined journeys. The only fault I can find is with the tale's finale, when it seems Dickens grows tired of the story, not actually having a great twist for the climax, and bumps off many of his characters before ending with a rather predictable chocolate tin finish. However, your sense of achievment at having penetrated deeper into the world of Dickens, meeting memorable heroes and villains will probably overcome any misgivings on this score. The scene where Mr Pancks cuts the patriarch's hair is pure genius and the petulant Mr Dorrit, Flora Casby and her objectionable Aunt are another constant stream of entertainment.
Apart from the moral that money will not buy you happiness, Dickens also used this book to launch a scathing criticism against the government and society of the time, represented by the infamous Circumlocution Office and a certain affluent couple named Merdle.
An excellent read for all those who have a reasonable grasp of the English language or have enjoyed other Dickens books.
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