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Lisey's Story Unknown Binding – 24 Oct 2006


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Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (24 Oct. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743561945
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743561945
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are the Dark Tower novels, Cell, From a Buick 8, Everything's Eventual, Hearts in Atlantis, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and Bag of Bones. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, was also a bestseller. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

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Review

A wondrous novel of marriage, a love story steeped in strength and tenderness, and cast with the most vivid, touching and believable characters in recent literature . . . A dazzling novel that you'll thank yourself for reading long after the final page is turned. (Nicholas Sparks, author of THE NOTEBOOK)

An incredibly gifted storyteller (Guardian) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Perhaps Stephen King's most personal and powerful novel and audiobook to date, LISEY'S STORY is a beautifully textured suspense narrative about the wellsprings of creativity, the temptations of madness and the secret language of love. Read by Mare Winningham --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 11 May 2012
Format: Paperback
I'm really surprised this book has just three stars on Amazon. I think it's one of King's best. Lisey's Story for me was a poignant novel about love and obsession with fantasy elements subtle enough to enthrall. Throughout the plot King hints at a world just behind our own, and I felt this was an almost perfect example of magic realism, a genre I don't easily enjoy.
The title Lisey's Story is telling. As in Daphne DuMaurier's Rebecca the character who drives the plot, horror novelist Scott Landon, is dead, and the true hero is his widow Lisey, who must escape the legacy of her husband's art. He drew his inspiration literally from another world. One haunted by a terrifying entity. There's also a human antagonist in the shape of an obsessed fan seeking Scott's papers, who's effective because he isn't overused.
I guess one could argue that the book is too long. I think at one point it spends over ten pages, dotted with lengthy flashbacks, covering what can't be more than several seconds in the main story. But unlike other King stories the length didn't bother me because everything written in some way contributes to a better understanding of either the characters or the plot. Lisey and her sisters are well-rounded, realistic people. Scott seems like a profoundly tortured soul who just wanted to love his wife and saw writing as necessary bloodletting.
This in my opinion is one of King's most mature, poetic horror novels, putting him on a par with the greatest storytellers history has known.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By DragonOn on 25 Nov. 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is full of amazing literary gems, more so than you'd usually expect from a SK work. However, what it boasts in its gilded language it lacks in pace. Granted it involves realistic, endearing charcters who become engraved upon our conscious mind, even hours after putting the book down, but Sk takes a sharp turn here toward that hazy concept of literary fiction; the concept he so vehemently believes is the art of ignoring the fundamental gift of a book; story. Although this book contains plots and a developing story, it does take a quite substantial amount of pages before we can actually become engaged and interested. Now in saying that I'm not comparing this with earlier works and rating it accordingly, as a lot of people are doing. I'm rating it based on the enjoyment I got from it, and I was torn between four and five stars. I gave it four in the end because of its slow start. All in all, a brilliant piece from one of the greatest storytellers known.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Samuel TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Oct. 2006
Format: Hardcover
At first I had reservations about Lisey's story. Those others of King's books told from a female perspective (Gerald's Game, Dolores Claiborne, Rose Madder) are amongst my least favourite of his novels. Thus, I was prepared to be disappointed - and, initially, I was.

The story is told as two narrative threads - firstly, in the present day, secondly as a series of memories from the heroine of the story - Lisey Landon, wife of the deceased author Scott Landon. Scott Landon who had troubles of his own - many of which seem to mirror King in real life.

Ultimately, however, one starts to care about the characters, and age and near-death has certainly not dulled King's ability to describe the minutiae of life in such absorbing detail. By the end of the story, the characters - and the portrayal of the twenty-five year marriage - between Scott and Lisey seemed real, and the feelings - although not the events - described could mirror any long marriage.

There are also enough references to others of Kings works to keep the hardened fan happy. Deputies Ridgewick and Clutterbuck from Needful Things make appearances, the Territories are never far away, and there's also mention of a little place called Shooters Knob, Tennessee.

If there is a downside - and why I haven't given five stars for this review - it is because there is nothing entirely new here. There are shades of Rose Madder, The Talisman and at least one of the stories in Four Past Midnight... but King, at his literary best, is still the best around. Despite his so-called retirement after his near-fatal accident, King seems as prolific as ever and, with other books apparently in the pipeline, I hope that they are as enjoyable as this.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By El Fidela on 13 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
Having read some of the reviews below I don't really understand what these self-styled fans expect - Stephen King's earlier work is almost like that of a different author, but surely that's a compliment? People say things like "Stephen King's earlier work is better so read The Shining". That's a strange statement to make about an author whose career has spanned over thirty years - how odd it would be if he was still churning out work in the same style.

Everyone's approach evolves as they get older and I think that Stephen King's more recent and undeniably somewhat rambling novels such as Dreamcatcher and Insomnia are amongst the best he has written, particularly Dreamcatcher, which I often think about despite having read it years ago (the mark of a good book). Lisey's Story is in a similar vein. I don't like fantasy novels and I often feel a slight regret for Mr King's tendency to go wandering off into alternative universes but in this novel Booya Moon can almost be be viewed not as a real place but as a symbol for the safe place we have inside us, the reserve of inner strength that stops us from going mad in difficult situations and the protection that we provide for those closest to us. Someone on here stated that they wondered whether this novel was a thinly veiled apology to Tabitha King and on reading the book I felt it hard to believe that it wasn't at some level about the Kings relationship - to me that made it more interesting still. I suppose Stephen King has attracted his fair share of incunks through the years and it is interesting to acquire some understanding, although heavily diluted, into what he might make of it all. Interviewers always ask authors the hackneyed favourite "where do you get your ideas from?
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