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Liquid Acrobat As Regards The Air
 
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Liquid Acrobat As Regards The Air

29 July 1991 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:26
30
2
3:03
30
3
3:47
30
4
3:24
30
5
4:40
30
6
3:42
30
7
2:29
30
8
2:03
30
9
3:02
30
10
2:57
30
11
2:40
30
12
10:51
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1971
  • Release Date: 29 July 1991
  • Label: Universal-Island Records Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1971 Island Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:04
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003TYG6AM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 79,577 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Philip McLaughlin on 25 July 2005
Format: Audio CD
The change of label seemed to have breathed new life into the band. It has been said in reviews that a downward slide began with Changing Horses. I would agree - up to a point. I saw them live round about the time Liquid Acrobat was released, and they only played tracks from this album and their early classics. It still remains one of the most lively and uplifting concerts I've ever been to.
The strength of this album is the range of songs offered. There's still the quirky typical ISB stuff such as Evolution Rag and Adam and Eve and one that may irritate (!) - Cosmic Boy. There's also the very tight rock numbers such as Dear Old Battefield. The presence of Gerry Conway on drums (who also contributed so much to the first Steeleye Span album) undoubtedly pulls the rock tracks together. There's a jigs medley, almost as good as that on Fairport Convention's Liege and Lief, and the moving World War I inspired Darling Belle.
Lastly this was the album that turned Stephen Fry onto folk music! Apparently he played it constantly at school.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. K. A. Bell on 30 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
Heading rapidly towards the twilight of their career, the Incredibles took a stab at Going Electric - a favourite passtime in the seventies for folk orientated acts.
Whilst others came the proverbial cropper, the Incredibles acquitted themselves with some aplomb. The songs of Robin Williamson and Mike Heron, whilst becoming shorter and more comercially orientated still maintained the wit and wisdom of their epics of yore.
So, we get two beauties from Mike Heron in the form of RED HAIR and WORLDS THEY RISE AND FALL, and Williamson weighs in with the epic DARLING BELLE and a couple of comedy songs, EVOLUTION RAG and ADAM AND EVE.
As it stands, it's a bit of a period piece now. The production sounds a little dated and limp. But for string Band completists, it's a very listenable addition to their collection.
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By The BlackFerret on 17 Oct. 2011
Format: MP3 Download
The first proper album for Island-Be Glad For The Song Has No Ending wasn't exactly planned too well, whereas this was.

There are highlights, Red Hair & Here Til Here Is There are excellent still, and Painted Chariot is very good, but lowlights(Evolution Rag and Cosmic Boy are not quirky, they are just plain silly & not much fun)and a pointless rerecording of Trees from the very first album.

The problem is Darling Belle. Fine idea, a sort of Folk-Rock Opera about WWI, but it doesn't fit with the rest of the album or the new image, and sticks out like a sore thumb, making the whole album bitty in the process. If only they'd turned that & not Be Glad into a half-hour show & a film.............!

So the verdict remains, as it was after buying this in 1971, not bad, but not really the right standard we expected.
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By GeoffSpain on 20 Jan. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Liquid Acrobat is (probably) my second favourite ISB album after Wee Tam & The Big Huge. The first track "Talking of the End" is, in my view one of the most inventive instrumental combinations ever invented by the ISB. I have to admit, there are a couple of songs that fall rather short of perfection but Darling Belle leaves me breathless every time I hear it. The record has been in my collection since 1971 and the CD when it was first issued.

As with many of the 60/70 groups, it's easy to criticise the quality of production, and I feel Liquid Acrobat could have been improved if Joe Boyed had been involved. Nevertheless.....a fantastic record. Hope Fledgling can get hold of the masters and do with it the great gob they have done with the first four ISB disks.

Only one more thing to say... BUY IT.
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