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Like Colour to the Blind: Soul Searching and Soul Finding Paperback – 1 Nov 1998


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Like Colour to the Blind: Soul Searching and Soul Finding + Somebody Somewhere: Breaking Free from the World of Autism + Nobody Nowhere: The Remarkable Autobiography of an Autistic Girl
Price For All Three: £47.97

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Jessica Kingsley; New Ed edition (1 Nov. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853027200
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853027208
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 499,234 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Product Description

Review

'Nobody Nowhere tears aside the veil that conceals the mind of the autistic person. Donna Williams' account has the magnetic and unrivalled power of authenticity ... this book is absorbing, disturbing, enriching and it will cause many to substantially revise their views of what it is that constitutes psychological normality.' - Professor Anthony Clare - 'Donna Williams isn't just teaching us what it is like to be autistic, she is teaching us what it is like to be human.' - The New York Book Times Review (of Somebody Somewhere)

From the Author

What Donna says about writing Autobiography
Why write about oneself?
Everyone has a different reason.

I wrote the first of my four autobiographical works, Nobody Nowhere, on the verge of suicide after a wild half-crazy life with abuse, homelessness and ultimately hope for belonging only to find I was terrified of real closeness. I had a last inkling of hope that I couldn't truly say I'd tried my hardest to cope if I'd never fully disclosed the nature of my own private world. So I wrote out everything that mattered in my feelings and decided to give it to one child psychiatrist in the hope they could tell me what kind of mad I was and whether there was hope for answers and belonging. My intention was to then shred it, burn it and leave this world. Instead it was passed on to his colleague, then from her to her publisher, from him to an agent and from there out into the world it became a number one international bestseller. But why write three more?

My second autobiography, Somebody Somewhere is so completely different to the first and exposed a world of such different, forgotten citizens of the world, that the story had to be told, to give a voice to the voiceless, to be a starting point for solidarity and building bridges. It too became a number one international bestseller.

The third work, Like Color to The Blind exposed three very controversial areas that I felt strongly about; the visual fragmentation of visual perceptual disorders, the importance of augmented and alternative communication systems for voiceless people and the search for selfhood buried underneath stored learning, something so many people struggle with in silence until its often too late.

The fourth book, Everyday Heaven was about the simultaneous discovery of sexuality, journeys in orientation and at the same time coping with loss in a two year span in which I lost three of the closest people in my life.

So I wrote each for very different reasons, to hope and to survive, to shout and to stay sane. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The manuscript for my second book, Somebody Somewhere, was almost finished; it was a photo album of my journey from 'my world' to 'the world,' in which I took the reins out of the hands of my autism and took control of my life. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Aug. 2001
Format: Paperback
this is a book of courage and faith. Once you start to read this book it is impossible to put down. It will have you laughing and crying at the same time. Very moving. recommend that you must read somebody somewhere and nobody nowhere to get the benefit of this womans brave and remarkable life.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Santo on 28 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
If you've read Nobody Nowhere and Somebody Somewhere, this third installment in Donna's life is definitely a must-read (and for those that haven't read the first two, get your hands on them first!). It delves deeper into some of the underlying difficulties in her processing difficulties (food issues, visual processing issues) and delves even deeper into "her world", and everyone, whether on the spectrum or not, will find something to relate to in this profound journey into the human experience.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "mywikiwikiways" on 28 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
Donna Williams wrote her third book in 1996, and it is mainly about her marriage to Ian, who is autistic like her. Also her fame is growing a lot and at the beginning she examines her various roles and her motivations for doing things. This is a central part of Like Colour for the Blind because she is looking at the way her compulsions drive her and Ian. They create rules for each other so that they can show their real selves to each other and other people. Malvern House is a particularly interesting setting and the Irlen glasses are prominent, as is a young man named Alex who uses facilitated communication. Donna shows her nurturing and encouraging side.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Finding and laboriously sticking to the true self. 7 Oct. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"Like Color to the Blind" is the third book by Donna Williams, after "Nobody Nowhere" and "Somebody Somewhere" but it could easily stand by itself. Donna, who is autistic, puts forth an amazing effort to break through the socially acceptable masks that she had grown in order to relate to society. She is in a relationship with a man who has similar problems, and they help each other as much as they can. A very important part of this book is the account of Irlen filters, tinted lenses that reduce the many symptoms of visual overload. Anyone who has thought about obtaining these lenses should read this, as it is a very eloquent account of these problems and their disappearance. The author, though going through understandable rough periods, seems to put all of her free effort into retaining who she is. I could use any number of cliche's here (touching, great read, etc) but I will just say that I loved this book and I hope that other people will, too.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A powerful tale of love and humanity 10 April 2000
By Benjamin Drasin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Before I read this book I didn't know anything about autism, and I didnt even realize what the auther's mental condition was until a fair way into the book. I happened to pick up this book at the library (catchy title, I guess), and loved it. This is not so much a story about autism, but rather a painfully personal account of the difficulties involved in sharing a life with another human being.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A must read for anyone new to the world of relationships. 8 Mar. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Having a relationship of any kind can be a journey that takes you to places never before experienced. Add to that relationship another component, as in this case, autism, and you will see just how difficult and joyful the journey can be. Donna Williams in her previous books explains her struggles with autism, and this time she has mapped out for us what having a loving, trusting relationship is all about. For those of us who take our relationships with others seriously, this book will cause you to take a second look and see there is room for improvement on that journey to experiencing the fullest of what being a "couple" means
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Donna Williams is the best 17 Sept. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
again, Donna Williams takes us through the eyes of an autistic person. Shes amazing, but you should read Nobody Nowhere first, because that is the stroy of her life, and it might help you understand this book more.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Third one of Donna Williams books I read 5 Jun. 2012
By Nancy A. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read Nobody Nowhere, Somebody Somewhere, and now I am reading Like Colour For The Blind. Donna williams writes beautifully and her story is so very inspiring. She is an autistic woman who overcame overwhelming obsticles. She has has a gift for helping the reader understand what being autistic is like for her. She explains in detail how she overcame the enormous difficulties of autism and created a beautiful and very meaningful life. I love her writng and highly recommend her books if you want to understand the true meaning of overcoming obstacles and moving towards leading a full life.
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