Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by SNaylerBooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Orders shipped daily from the UK. All international orders sent via airmail. Professional seller. Enquiries responded to daily.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Life's Too Short to Drink Bad Wine: 100 wines for the discerning drinker Hardcover – Illustrated, 18 Sep 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Illustrated
"Please retry"
£6.00 £0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Quadrille Publishing Ltd (18 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844007421
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844007424
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 2.1 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (108 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 62,064 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Anyone who can take the stress and self-consciousness out of trying new wines is to be praised. Anyone who can do it with enough charm and wit and friendliness to earn the name "companion" should be reverenced. At last, someone who really, really gets it. Somewhere between complicated technical detail and chummy cosy chattiness there is a space for proper wine-writing and no one occupies that space better than Simon Hoggart. This book contains more useful information than manuals ten times the size. And, just like the kind of wine he champions, the book leaves you feeling warmer and happier - quality without snobbery, value without cheapness, pleasure without preciosity. If you want to enjoy wine, the Hoggart's School of Wizardry and Wine-Craft is the best in the land..." -- Stephen Fry

"I would love to drink all of these wines - except of course on public transport!"
-- Boris Johnson

Review

"I would love to drink all of these wines - except of course on public transport!"

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Related Media

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mike J VINE VOICE on 25 Feb. 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a cracking little book and was fun and easy to read. I'm no wine expert but I think I can pick out a good bottle of wine, but I'm a strictly under £10 person. This book does have a couple of wines along that price point but I found the majority were £10-£40 bottles, some as much as £100+. Unless it's Champagne, I just wouldn't enjoy a bottle costing that much, regardless of how nice it tasted.

The book is aimed at the normal person with a few quid to spend, not solely at the wine buffs, which is good. I did find the advice fairly broad though, like, recommending Chablis as an overall wine rather than a specific bottle that the author found to be good.

Also, the wines recommended are really not available in supermarkets and you won't end up with a specific list of outstanding wines, more a good general pointer towards wine that should be good.

One thing it did open my eyes to, was buying random, no name bottles of wine, even at the sub £5 end of the market. When you understand why some wines are very cheap, it makes you more willing to try them. I bought 10 or 12 bottles of random cheapish wine and almost all were nice, I would never have done that before reading this book.

Worth a read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bluebell TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Dec. 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I enjoyed reading this well-written and entertaining book by an obvious wine-lover as opposed to a wine snob. It's an attractive book to look at with lots of colour illustrations of the wine-labels of the author's 100 recommended wines. There are good cartoon illustrations with comical quotes from the author's and other wine-drinkers' writings. There's lots of sensible advice about how to get the best value in your wine-purchases and encouragement to be more adventurous. He's right to say that German wines are neglected: many of them are superb and often with only about 8% alcohol: a clear advantage for keeping ones units down.

One thing that struck me repeatedly with his wine recommendations was that he didn't really deal with the fact that wine from an area or even from a single producer can vary greatly from year to year. For example, 2005 in Beaujolais was a great year: we bought lots and find that the quality is so good it can go with food that would normally require something weightier, whereas 2003 was disappointing. In some years even the famous wines can be relatively poor and you'd do better to buy a less exalted wine from a good year. I absolutely agree with the author that restaurants are not the place to buy fine wine, where a 100 to 400% mark-up applies.

I've imbibed (in moderation) a lot of different wines with my dinners over the last 35 years and one of the most important lessons has been how important it is to match the wine with the food your eating. Like the author I've found that a simple meal can be raised to a feast by having it with a wine that compliments the food.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Brixtonian on 25 Sept. 2009
Format: Hardcover
I was given this book for my birthday recently and thought 'What a pretty book' and `What great cartoons.' Then I started dipping into it and realised that the packaging was the least part of it - Simon Hoggart writes about the sort of wine most of us want to drink, in terms most of us can understand, and he's as funny about wine as he is about politicians. Practical, too, as when he recommends prosecco as a wine that can make people feel very merry without actually being drunk. There are 100 wines in the book, only a handful of them outside most people's price range and quite a lot available in supermarkets or Majestic. I'm going to start with Albarino and work my way through to Zind-Humbrecht Gewurztraminer and hope I don't run out of lifetime before I'm finished.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark H TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 April 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I guess you could call me an amateur wine buff. I like wine, I am old enough now to have worked out what wines I like and what I don't and I also know of those I like what are my favourite producers. I couldn't tell you every great year for Pichon-Longueville but I have been lucky enough to try a few decent producers and find ones I realy enjoy. And I also know what I like some of my friends hate and vice versa. So I am always interested in reading books like this as they often throw up some hidden gems to track down and try. And it is always nice to read someone who writes well about something that is a shared interest.

Before I get onto the good stuff though I do just have a small issue to take up with the list. It isn't the selection of wines that I am going to take issue with, each to their own and this book is good for showing a good range of wines. Plenty that I hadn't come across and will give a go. No, what I found a bit confusing and I am sure will confuse anyone new to wine appreciation is the book isn't consistent. On one hand the author recommends very specific wines, a particular producer of a particular variety of wine. For example, he writes wonderfully about Chateau Pavie and how he prefers the pre-1998 bottle before the vineyard changed hands and changed the production method to make it appeal more to the doyen of wine experts, Robert Parker. A very specific recommendation there. Then the author recommends Tokaji (or Tokay as the author spells it....) as a whole. I love Tokaji, a wonderful sweet wine to finish a meal with, but I know there is a world of difference between producers and gradings of quality. So, in my opinion, to go from recommending a very specific chateau producer of a St Emillion to a whole type of wine is a bit hard on the newcomer.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback