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Life's Hard And Then You Die
 
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Life's Hard And Then You Die

1 Mar 2003 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
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Popularity  
30
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4:13
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5:29
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3:38
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5:41
30
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3:57
30
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4:38
30
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3:53
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3:09
30
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4:20
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6:24
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5:29
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12
5:53
30
13
6:29

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Label: Virgin UK
  • Copyright: (C) 1986 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1986 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:03:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001JQSF74
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 47,256 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Jan 2001
Format: Audio CD
It's Immaterial represent a brilliant musical dead-end. No-one bought their records, no-one copied them and so what could have been the beginning of a fine tradition of English song fizzled out with their second album. I remember hearing them perform 'Driving Away From Home' on the Tube TV programme and thinking it was a nice ditty but a bit of a novelty record. Listening to it now I'm struck by how fresh it still sounds. But I think what tempted me to shell out my £5.99 in Our Price 15 years ago was the dead-pan title and the bleak smiling clown's face. I didn't know what to expect but what I got was a jewel of an album that packs a Ken Loach film into four or five minutes time after time after time. Razor-sharp lyrics, a singer-cum-actor on the vocal, and an eclectic mix of musical influnces from skiffle to salsa to songs that don't sound like anybody else in the slightest (like Space). If Morrissey wrote from the perspective of a persecuted young artist struggling with his sexuality, then It's Immaterial wrote songs about being an impoverished young dad in his twenties, about travelling salesmen "Ahh me/ I need a lucky break/ And I won't hesitate", about cramped housing and crampled ambition. Then just when you thought you understood where they were coming from, off they go with a bestial trumpetty funk of Ed's Funky Diner. I still think it's one of the BEST songs to play EXTREMELY LOUD when you're getting ready to go out to a party and you're trying to drum yourself into a positive mood.
It's Immaterial could and should have sired a branch of British music but they spawned no immitators. I've no idea what became of them, but their second album 'Song' was even better and if anyone wants to gift me a copy I'd be eternally grateful as mine is lost. If Edith Piaf had grown up playing guitar and living in Birkenhead in the 1980s with some talented musician friends she might have come up with something like this.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. George on 10 Aug 2002
Format: Audio CD
I wasn't in any way expecting what I found on this Album when I bought it in 1987, but to say it's one of my Top 20 favourites of all time would slightly understate the case. There is something indefinable about the music here that both captivates and unsettles, with the chart-entering 'Driving Away From Home' bearing litle resemblance to the rest of the selection.
This is an intelligent and extremely well-realised Album that belies its simplistic origins. For those of you who are genuinely moved by soaring harmonised vocals (courtesy of The Christians), rolling Spanish guitars and tongue-in-cheek meanderings, I would seriously recommend this to you. It's TheThe, Alanis Morissette and World Party all combined, and has a humour that is slightly left-of-centre.
It's Immaterial undoubtedly knew they'd produced a winner for Siren Records, but in the same way the album is produced they would have just winked and acknowledged it all with a wry smile. Recommended.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Aug 2001
Format: Audio CD
As the other reviewer hinted, It's Immaterials first album was a truly 'lost' 80's gem. Songs like Space, Better Idea, and Lullaby pointed at an English sound that few others were producing at the time, and that dated so much better than all the other pompous bollox that was firing out of those late eighties speakers. But it's their second album, 'Song' that was even better, being both bleaker and more melodic than their first offering. Homecoming and Heaven Knows are beautiful 'Blue Nile meets Black' melancholia, and still sound as sad and almost suffocating as they did when this album was first released. Nice cover too. Grab it if you see it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Reid VINE VOICE on 8 Aug 2008
Format: Audio CD
I don't often use the phrase "criminally ignored" but I am going to here. Forever dubbed with one hit wonder status (which isn't strictly true) its hard to believe that only a select few ever owned this album for it is, truly, one of the great lost masterpieces of modern music. From the opening bars of "Driving Away From Home" to the otherworldly outro of "Lullaby" (the vinyl albums original closer, this version contains three extra tracks) Life's Hard And Then You Die is one of the greatest albums ever to emerge from Liverpool.

Its Immaterial formed from the dying embers of Eric's stalwarts Yachts (who also contained Henry Priestman of The Christians) and enjoyed an erratic early career on various indie labels. The nearest they got to chart success was with "Gigantic Raft In The Philippines" before shedding several members and ending up as a duo. Somewhere along the way they also jettisoned any notions of having a conventional pop career and ended up on Virgin Records who, tragically, had no idea how to market them. In the image conscious 80's an odd looking duo penning kitchen sink dramas with a musical style that defines the term 'eclectic' must have seemed a daunting prospect to the A&R guys.

For that is the joy of this album. Veering from downbeat social commentary ("The Better Idea") to an Alan Bennett / John Osbourne inspired tale of crushed dreams ("Happy Talk") via trippy folk ("Rope") and Kerouac influenced monologues ("Space", "Driving Away From Home") - the albums second half is a kaleidoscopic mish mash of Latin American, North American and Eastern European flavours all shot through with a stark streak of Scouse observational humour (especially the energetic "Ed's Funky Diner" which deserved so much more when released as a single).
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