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Lifeblood
 
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Lifeblood

1 Jan 2001 | Format: MP3

£5.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £4.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:08
30
2
3:38
30
3
4:04
30
4
4:18
30
5
3:56
30
6
3:57
30
7
3:33
30
8
3:12
30
9
3:40
30
10
3:20
30
11
4:01
30
12
3:27


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 2001
  • Release Date: 1 Jan 2001
  • Label: Sony Music UK
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 45:14
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004QNS5B8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 45,767 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Hon Guin Lee on 14 Feb 2005
Format: Audio CD
In hearing "The Love of Richard Nixon", it had been expectant that we were drawn to hear uninspiring tunes from the Manics similar to the messed and flawed "Know Your Enemy". In fact it's sheer brilliance from the Blackwood's finest trio. It kinds of throws away the tension, confusion and experimentation from their previous album starting with a nice mellowing clean slate. The majority of its slow tracks, it hooks to your feel-good senses desperately often unrequited with their earlier work, in every way possible it is whispering to you breathlessly to say this album is a modern-art classic.
Kicking with a good opening track, "1985" shows light anthem rock with soothing melodic rhythms similar to "A Design for Life", clearly reminding you how they matured as a band to a softer direction in rock. "Empty Souls", "Song for Departure", and "Live to Fall Asleep" really highlights that the Manics can produce nice pop-rock with the digging of 1987-era U2 in "To Repel Ghosts" to New-Orderish feel in "Fragments" suiting for all tastes.
The album adds new blends of nice upbeat, harmonious electro-piano melange topped with classic vocals of James Dean Bradfield putting them on a new inspiring level although not clearly as profoundly ingenious with their dark album "The Holy Bible" but this is an album for mature Manic fans. Go buy and listen as it proves the Manics fulfil to all expectations.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By sth_Weird on 19 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
I guess the manics could release a country album and I'd still love it!
Once again different to anything they've done before (but I'm getting used to that...after all each of their albums is unique), but still it's the typical manic street preachers style.
The album has great lyrics, and James delivers them with so much devotion (as he always does) that it gives you goosebumps (in a positive way). Sometimes the drums sound a bit electronical and artificial, and since I think Sean Moore is the most versatile, most inventive and most genious (and fastest) of all drummers I know, this is a bit sad, but on the other hand the fact he made it sound that way shows his greatness even more, because combined with the music, the electronical/artificial drums sound really good (but I love the "real" drum roll on Cardiff Afterlife).
If your musical interest is limited to rock, and you want to hear the manics rock (and rock only), then I'm not sure if you'll have much fun with this album. But if you're as versatile as the manics, you may find another manic masterpiece here!
My faves from the album are 1985, Glasnost and To Repell Ghosts.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By kev campkin on 7 Nov 2004
Format: Audio CD
A 'new' direction for the Manic Street Preachers, but I heard a lot of what 'This Is My Truth' could've been in this, their latest efforts. The filler is still there (but to a much less extent), and the important main failing about 'TIMT' has been rectified - musically it is a joy.
Ok, so 'Nixon' is appalling and unlike a lot of reviewers I'm not so keen on '1985' either; just because it namecheck's Morrissey and is as political as they dare get on this album it doesn't turn my head. Indeed, the fact that will distinguish this from all Manic albums is the number of tracks where Nicky Wire seems to be telling us how he is feeling, rather than what he is feeling or reading or complaining about. Such a lyrical honesty probably hasn't been seen by a Manic since 'Ocean Spray' by Bradfield, or Richey's works that straddled 'THB' and 'EMG'.
'Empty Souls' stomped live, but tiptoes in the studio, a lilting track with echoey piano and a faint riff underlying the song with more than a nudge towards 'Motorcycle Emptiness', 'A Song For Departure' will surely be listened to by partners everywhere who have just loved and lost and on 'Emily' the listener is left wondering if Wire respects Pankhurst (the suffragette martyr) or if he is writing her a love letter. Still, this album has arguably everything right that was wrong with the last two studio efforts, and if 'Nixon' can nearly get to No.1 against one of the strongest chart toppers of the year, then surely anything is possible in this remarkable but unsurprising reinvention.
The Manics have stopped trying to recreate 'Motown Junk' (and they are getting a bit old for such buzzsaw heroics), and have instead made 'This Is My Truth - New And Improved & Feat. 110% More Emotion'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M G. on 4 Nov 2004
Format: Audio CD
If your looking for the Manic Street Preachers who made 'Generation terrorists', 'The Holy Bible' and 'Know your enemy' you're going to be out of luck, maybe next time (if there is a next time!). But if your favourite Manics' stuff is on 'Everything must go' and 'This is my truth...' then step this way. The attraction (or at least part of the attraction) to me is that in a world that seems dominated by mindless pop or whoever is this years' big new thing, the manics have always managed to stick out like John kerry at a republican convention. Where there is nothing up there with 'Design for life' or 'Motorcycle emptiness', there is '1985' or 'A song for departure', which come pretty damn close. There are sounds, beats and moods that you have never heard the manics pull off quiet like they have here. 'Glasnost' is almost 'Keane' like in someways and on 'Always/never' for a moment you might think the chilli's are in the studio with them. But they always manage to have that way of stamping their mark on each and every song, no matter what track you choose. There's not a power chord to be heard (well, maybe here and there), but that doesn't mean it's downbeat, in fact far from it as 'Empty Souls' proves. It's well worth your hard earned cash. Album of the year, maybe not, but it could be in most people's top ten.
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