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Liar Moon (Captain Martin Bora Mysteries) Paperback – 20 Jan 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 210 pages
  • Publisher: BITTER LEMON PRESS (20 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904738826
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904738824
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 2.9 x 19.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 58,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Praise for 'Lumen' by Ben Pastor: "Pastor's plot is well crafted, her prose sharp - a disturbing mix of detection and reflection." Publisher's Weekly "And don't miss Lumen by Ben Pastor. When an abbess thought to have supernatural powers is murdered in Nazi-occupied Cracow, the Wehrmacht officer's investigation is complicated by his compatriots' cruelty and the Catholic Church's secrecy. An interesting, original and melancholy tale." Literary Review --This text refers to the Digital Download edition.

About the Author

BEN PASTOR, born in Italy, worked as a university professor in Vermont. She is one of the most talented writers in the field of historical fiction. In 2008 she won the prestigious Premio Zaragoza for best historical fiction. She writes in English. --This text refers to the Digital Download edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J.K. Currie VINE VOICE on 6 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is winter 1943 in northern Italy not far from Verona and a local Fascist grandee has died in suspicious circumstances. The reluctant Major Martin Bora of the Wehrmacht is ordered to investigate the death.

Martin Bora is a man with problems. He has lost his brother recently in battle, he has perhaps lost his wife's love, and as the novel opens he has just lost his left hand to a Partisan bomb. In addition, a nameless SS officer swears to him that he will make it his business to destroy Bora as a `Jew-lover'.

This is not sunny Italy of the imagination, but a bleak wintry north blasted by snow, rain and frost, emphasising the darkness suffusing the novel. The author also throws in the pain experienced by Bora throughout the story, physical pain from his injuries, and moral pain from what he has already done in the war and what he is ordered to do now. Pastor has dared to do something original in her writing: she has placed her creation in an impossible situation and has given him a conscience.

Liar Moon is a superb piece of writing. Pastor's rich and limpid prose and the stately pace of the narrative combine to produce a tale and tone which are bleak and sombre but also a delight to read. The wonderfully allusive and understated way in which the episode of the transportation of Jews is written presents the reader with Bora's quandary, how does a man of conscience and principle cope with evil?

Read this wonderful book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Jan. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having really enjoyed the first in the Major Martin Bora series, Lumen (Captain Martin Bora Mysteries), I couldn't wait to read this. When we first met Bora in "Lumen", the Germans had just invaded Poland. Much has passed since then and our Major has spent time in Russia before being sent to Italy to fight the partisans. It is 1943 and Italy is divided - the North is controlled by the Fascists and the South has been liberated by the Allied forces. Having survived Stalingrad, Bora has just been injured in Italy and has lost his left hand, as well as suffering other injuries. Added to the doubts he is still having about his marriage and it is fair to say that he is a much more battle weary soldier this time around.

Despite his injuries, he is asked to look into the murder of a local fascist, Vittorio Lisi. Unwilling and in pain, he is not keen to get involved, but eventually becomes involved in the investigation. Like "Lumen", Bora has a local confidante to aid him - in this novel it is Inspector Sandro Guidi. The problem is, that the chief suspect in Lisi's murder is his beautiful young wife, Clara, and Guidi is unable to be unbiased when he falls for her charms... There is a very chilling moment when the radio has an announcement that all Jews are to be "arrested and interned in concentration camps" and Guidi has a "glum lack of interest" while his mother does not react at all, suggesting that the actual reaction of apathy from the majority of people at that time was more damaging that those actually involved in the slaughter.

This is another wonderful mystery, with an exciting historical setting and sympathetic characters.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the second in Ben Pastor’s Martin Bora series. It should be noted that while the action has jumped from Poland 1939 to Italy in late 1943 that Like Philip Kerr’s the books do not necessarily follow a chronological order of time with some of the later books (currently in Italian only) dealing with events for example during the Spanish Civil War.

The Bora that emerges in this book is no longer the confident and somewhat innocent character of “Lumen”. He has lost much of his faith in the rightness of the German cause and is significantly more cynical. He has been through the hell of the Eastern front and has lost his brother to the fighting at Kursk. This book opens with him physically maimed following a partisan attack – he has lost his left hand and he spends much of the book in a physical agony that mirrors his growing mental anguish at the war and more especially at the German conduct of it. The descriptions of his wounds are not for the faint hearted.

He is called to investigate the murder of an old wheelchair bound colleague of Mussolini’s. He is paired reluctantly (on both their parts) with the optimistic and slightly rumpled Italian detective Sandro Guido. Guido initially comes across as slightly stereotypical – single he lives with his adoring mother but he soon carves out a niche of his own. Despite all their differences and their ongoing disagreements they both share one vital thing in common – a single minded pursuit of the truth no matter what the consequences for them are. The relationship is beautifully sketched between the two men. While never reaching a friendship there is mutual respect between the two as they doggedly pursue the truth to its conclusion.

The background detail again like Lumen is the best part of the book.
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Format: Paperback
" The Americans had landed in Salerno and were inching up the peninsula" is one line to really upset the British reader in this second book of a series about a German officer in World War II. Another `fact' is that the main character, Major Martin Bora, of the German Wehrmacht, has in this book a Scottish mother, but in the third book of the series `A Dark Song of Blood' his mother is English. These erroneous inclusions are enough to cause doubts about the true knowledge and accuracy of the author, who states she is/was a professor of history.
In truth, the Americans did land at Salerno, but the British and Commonwealth troops took the main action. Salerno saw twice as many fatalities of British troops as Americans, with 531 British killed against 225 Americans, the Brits had twice as many wounded and three times more missing in action. So, the book is written for the USA and Italian markets, so carry on regardless about the accuracy.
Shame really as the character of Major Bora is quite fascinating and his stalwart attitude in realising his line of duty is quite amazing. Apart from serious wounds inflicted by a grenade and emotional pressures and domestic worries he is set on course, not only to carry out his duty as a soldier, but to also investigate murders in liaison with the fascinating Inspector Guido. Murder mystery is fun to solve by the reader as the point of the chase is to `guess who', but in this case the reader has no chance. Why? Because the biggest sin of the crime writer is to introduce a character late on in the book and hey presto! We have the culprit.
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