C. S. Lewis & Francis Schaeffer and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading C. S. Lewis & Francis Schaeffer on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

C. S. Lewis & Francis Schaeffer: Lessons for a New Century from the Most Influential Apologists of Our Time [Paperback]

Scott R. Burson , Jerry L. Walls , Jerry Walls
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
RRP: 13.99
Price: 12.19 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.80 (13%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 25 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 10.51  
Paperback 12.19  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

17 Mar 1998
In this book Scott Burson and Jerry Walls compare and contrast for the first time the thought of Lewis and Schaeffer. With great respect for the legacy of each man, but with critical insight as well, they suggest strengths and weaknesses of their apologetics. All the while they consider what Lewis and Schaeffer still have to offer in light of postmodernism and other cultural currents that, since their deaths, have changed the apologetic landscape.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Paperback: 310 pages
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press (17 Mar 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830819355
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830819355
  • Product Dimensions: 20.9 x 14 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,156,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Burson and Walls have written an insightful, timely book here which draws upon the thoughts and ideas of two men, whom they rightly proclaim as the most influencial Christian apologists of our century. This book should be widely read by Christians everywhere, but it most likely won't be, because interest in theology and apologetics doesn't seem to be exactly thriving these days. Still, to those who feel that theology matters, this book is chock full of useful information. Schaeffer and Lewis are shown here to have held many different views towards issues such as predestination, the atonement, and divine revelation, but one thing they most certainly did agree upon: the absolute necessity for Christians to engage their culture with the liberating truths of their Master, Jesus. Burson and Walls make this clear, and glean some very practical lessons for the rest of us to take and ponder while continuing to "bear the Light" in the world as these two giants did. This book reveals the genius, passion and courage of both men, and I for one hope and pray that it will encourage believers everywhere to follow in their footsteps.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book gives a detailed and equitable treatment to the published work of Lewis & Schaeffer. Lewis & Schaeffer's many fans will get a great deal more out of their reading if they will give this book their attention beforehand. I offer 4 stars, not because of a quality problem, but rather because I think that the book would have benefitted from more of the personal thoughts and views of the authors. For each point of theology and apologetics that they critique Lewis & Schaeffer, the authors offer us a view that seems to be a combination of the best that Lewis & Schaeffer had to offer. I would like to read an apologetic work by these authors that specifically espouses their own thoughts, while giving attention to the obvious impact that Lewis & Schaeffer have had on them.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Mere Lewis? 24 Jun 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
C.S. Lewis is easily the most well-known Christian apologist and writer. Like many people outside the Christian fold, I've probably read Lewis even before I started reading the actual Bible he was defending! Francis Schaeffer is another well known apologist, at least in the United States. Here in Sweden, by contrast, Schaeffer is virtually unknown, although (curiously) the very first Christian book I've ever read was authored by a former L'Abri student, a certain Stefan Gustavsson.

"C.S. Lewis and Francis Schaeffer" by Scott Burson and Jerry Walls is a book summarizing and comparing the two thinkers and their respective apologetics. Personally, I found the book a very easy read, but other reviewers apparently fought with it longer. I'm therefore not sure who could be best served by this work - perhaps students of theology who already have a working knowledge of Lewis and/or Schaeffer? I think Burson and Walls do a good job summing up Lewis' ideas, but since I've only read one work by Schaeffer, I can't really vouch for their description of him.

Lewis and Schaeffer had very different theological perspectives and backgrounds. Lewis was a well-educated Oxford literature professor and something of a bon vivant, while Schaeffer was teetotaller, had an American blue-collar background and spent most of his life evangelizing people from all walks of life. He also made forays into partisan politics, something Lewis never did. Frankly, Schaeffer seems to have been somewhat eccentric, as well. But then, perhaps Lewis' friendship with Owen Barfield, Charles Williams and J. R. R. Tolkien could be seen as pretty weird, too! Strangely, the two men never met, despite being rough contemporaries, Schaeffer even visiting Oxford at one point.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
57 of 66 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Someone ought to analyze Burson's and Wall's heterodoxy 26 May 2000
By Randy Grandle - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
While presenting a generally concise and accurate summary of much of what Lewis and Schaeffer wrote and taught, the authors (Burson and Walls) seem to have a "hidden agenda" of damning Francis Schaeffer with "faint praise." The authors reject Schaeffer's Reformed views on Predestination (not surprising given that both are professors at a leading theological seminary with a decidedly Arminian tradition). They promote a view of human freedom that is quite consistent with a generally Arminian perspective on such matters. Moreover, the authors seem to leave the door open for the "Openness of God" and other such postmodernist and heterodox viewpoints of God's omniscience...
Burson and Walls also question Schaeffer's views on Inerrancy and reject his views affirming the substitutionary atonement. Instead, they seem to embrace a "limited errancy" view on the doctrine of the inspiration of scripture. They also emphatically embrace a view of salvation and eternal damnation that includes Purgatory and postmortem evangelism.
Overall, this book is worth reading to see how far the "Great Evangelical Disaster" has progressed since Francis Schaeffer's passing in 1984. These two leading evangelical professors can promote heterodoxy with little fear of confrontation or protest from the evangelical academic community. Schaeffer has long been despised by of the evangelical academic community because he exposed their accommodation to the twin idols of academic freedom and academic respectability. May God raise up a generation of Francis Schaeffer's who can bypass the evangelical academic backwaters for the fresh streams of Kingdom service--unencumbered by accommodation to modern idols...
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lessons Indeed from Two Valiant Christian Warriors 20 Oct 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Burson and Walls have written an insightful, timely book here which draws upon the thoughts and ideas of two men, whom they rightly proclaim as the most influencial Christian apologists of our century. This book should be widely read by Christians everywhere, but it most likely won't be, because interest in theology and apologetics doesn't seem to be exactly thriving these days. Still, to those who feel that theology matters, this book is chock full of useful information. Schaeffer and Lewis are shown here to have held many different views towards issues such as predestination, the atonement, and divine revelation, but one thing they most certainly did agree upon: the absolute necessity for Christians to engage their culture with the liberating truths of their Master, Jesus. Burson and Walls make this clear, and glean some very practical lessons for the rest of us to take and ponder while continuing to "bear the Light" in the world as these two giants did. This book reveals the genius, passion and courage of both men, and I for one hope and pray that it will encourage believers everywhere to follow in their footsteps.
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid Writing, Suspect Conclusions 21 Aug 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I must admit that I found this book intriguing and valuable, however, only as a sense of somebody else's opinions on two influential apologists. Many of the authors' conclusions and critiques on Lewis and Schaeffer were well presented, except for one thing. One got the sense as the book was read, that the authors were very proficient and setting up straw men to knock down or using statements somewhat out of context to support their own theological views. While I have no problem using other's statements to support your own theological views, I do have a problem with writing a book under the guise of a critique of apologists in order to support and strengthen your own theological slant.
I can't say that their theological slant was that much different then my own. There are differences, but I found myself agreeing with the bulk of their presentation theologically. However, I do feel that they may have done Schaeffer and Lewis an injustice by oversimplifying their positions. The book is worth reading, but not for a completely accurate depiction of Lewis and Schaeffer's positions.
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Use this as a Tool to Examine Your Own Faith 22 Dec 2000
By Bruce K. Day - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I selected this book to read after reading Hugh Hewett's "The Embarassed Believer". I wanted to get a better feel for what apologetics is about. What better place to go than to the two greatest apologists of the 20th century.
Burson and Walls certainly have a point of view, but I do not think that it detracts from their comparisons of Lewis and Schaeffer. I found that it pushed me to hold up my own beliefs to the same analyses they used on their subjects. I learned where I have strengths and where there are gaping holes in my understanding of the faith.
The territory covered is quite expansive, many of the areas of belief were outside of any regular theological discussions by lay leaders in my church experience. As a Christian called to lay ministry, I have found it important to carefully examine my own beliefs about the nature of the relationship between God and Man before trying to take the "good news" to those outside of the church.
As most comparisons of human-beings are, there are flaws. We are all flawed, but we all have something to say about who and what God is and does in the world. This book gives us a framework to build and articulate our own understanding of what faith in Jesus represents in the millenium ahead.
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Burson and Walls have delivered an apologetic of their own. 23 Mar 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book gives a detailed and equitable treatment to the published work of Lewis & Schaeffer. Lewis & Schaeffer's many fans will get a great deal more out of their reading if they will give this book their attention beforehand. I offer 4 stars, not because of a quality problem, but rather because I think that the book would have benefitted from more of the personal thoughts and views of the authors. For each point of theology and apologetics that they critique Lewis & Schaeffer, the authors offer us a view that seems to be a combination of the best that Lewis & Schaeffer had to offer. I would like to read an apologetic work by these authors that specifically espouses their own thoughts, while giving attention to the obvious impact that Lewis & Schaeffer have had on them.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xab0bbb4c)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback