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Letters from an Alien Schoolboy Paperback – 1 Sep 2010

36 customer reviews

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£5.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Letters from an Alien Schoolboy + Letters from an Alien Schoolboy: Cosmic Custard + Letters from an Alien Schoolboy: Galactic Poodle
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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Piccadilly (1 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184812094X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848120945
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 259,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ros Asquith has been a Guardian newspaper cartoonist for 20 years and has written and illustrated over 60 books for young people. Her latest book, 'Letters from an Alien Schoolboy' has been shortlisted for the 2011 Roald Dahl Funny Prize and the 2011 Tower Hamlets book award. She answered only to the name of Jim until she was five andbelieved herself to be an Apache brave until she was nine.
Her first job, aged 17, was illustrating Greek Myths for an American audio visual company. She graduated from Camberwell School of Art, working as a photographer, designer and teacher beforebecoming theatre critic for
Time Out magazine, Co-Theatre Editor of CITY LIMITS, deputy Theatre critic of the OBSERVER
and diary writer for TV TIMES.
Ros has painted murals in several countries and many children's bedrooms, cuddled a wolf, stroked a tiger, juggled with a travelling circus and caught an escaped tarantula.
For more about Ros, see her website: http://www.rosasquith.co.uk/rosasquith.html
LETTERS FROM AN ALIEN SCHOOLBOY:http://www.alienschoolboy.co.uk/
To see Ros's cartoons for the Guardian go to: http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/ros-asquith

Product Description

Review

"This is the first in a terrific new series for both boys and girls. Packed with some hilarious illustrations and the story itself is a real page-turner. ... full of humour and pace which is sure to appeal to even the most reluctant of readers." -- Lovereading4kids, September 2010

"First in a terrific new series for both boys and girls. Packed with some hilarious illustrations and the story itself is a real page-turner. ... full of humour and pace which is sure to appeal to even the most reluctant of readers." --Lovereading4kids, September 2010

"Imagine My Step Parents are Aliens colliding with The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole ... This funny tale, underscored with some cracking cartoons is a great laugh, especially for those with typically schoolboy humour." --Carousel, March 2011

"The humour is well balanced, infectiously funny, and more importantly relevant. ... Dear teacher or librarian ... put this book in a prominent position on the shelf ... It is like reading a child's version of Douglas Adams "Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy" and anyone reading it will be affected by it - on some level. It might even open their mind..." --Just Imagine Story Centre, July 2011

About the Author

Ros Asquith started out as a photographer, became theatre critic for Time Out, City Limits and The Observer before emerging as an author and cartoonist. She wrote the best-selling book, I Was A Teenage Worrier, and the Girl Writer series.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Starblazer on 27 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback
Flowkwee, the alien schoolboy, is helping his father improve earthlings. Flowkwee has to disguise as a human being. The mechanical machine which they call the 'improver' is very large, very magical and very clever. The illustrations of the threggs made my daddy and me laugh. Flowkwee makes friends with a girl called Susan (for a while, Flowkee thinks Susan is a boy!) who calls Flowkwee Nigel because Nigel is his human name.

I liked this book a lot and it is very funny. It's got a few alien words that are quite hard to read. I liked the sound of this story, my daddy discovered it on Amazon. When I read the last word in the book, I instantly thought to myself that this is one of my favourite stories. This is a long book but I just really wanted to read more and more every evening.

I brought this book in for book week at school and I gave very good comments on it. (That's why I've given it five stars!) My book was very different to the others in the class. I've never really had a book like this, but I am happy that my daddy gave it to me.

From my point of view, I think this is a VERY VERY good book and also I recommend this book for 5/6 year-olds and over (I'm 7). I read this book to myself every evening and I was sorry to finish it.

Great book and if anybody is going to buy it, please enjoy reading this amazing story.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ed.F TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Flowkwee is an alien who finds life on Earth confusing, funny and perplexing, feelings that human children can also identify with. The family's alien names are all pleasingly reminiscent of bodily functions, but their Earth names are not quite as ridiculous as they first seem when you consider what people call their children nowadays. The family disguise themselves as earthlings and try and go about everyday life, despite having to give up two heads, all their antennae and deal with complex issues like how to wear underwear.

This is a funny, lively book that my seven year old really enjoyed. The invented language was challenging at first but then really got her imagination going, and she was delighted by the illustrations. The themes of fitting in and dealing with life's every day, annoying problems are ones that both parents and children can enjoy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A John TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Flowkwee is on a mission with one set of his parents (he appears to have 3 sets), to investigate earth, and pick up some human samples. His task is to infiltrate a school, as a schoolboy, trying to hide his vastly advanced knowledge. Unfortunately they arrived 50 years later than anticipated, and with a very sketchy understanding of human behaviour and customs.

This is a really entertaining book, which looks at just how silly some of the things we do might appear. I got this for my 7 year old son, who liked the idea of reading about aliens. Before this, the only paperbacks he had read were Horrid Henry books. When this arrived, he was initially put off by some of the difficult "alien" words in the first chapter. However, I sat down and read the first chapter to him, he then took the book and was off. He read the rest of the book by himself. It took him just over a week, reading about a chapter each evening. He loved reading it, and found it very funny, frequently bringing me a page to show me the funniest bits! His 11 year old brother also read it (in two hours), and thought it was really funny. I finally got my hands back on the book after both of them.

I definitely recommend this . Its a great book for getting kids into paperbacks. Its also one of those books which makes you think at the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Beansmummy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
My seven and a half year old son (year 3) and I took it in turns to read chapters (letters) to each other, and both really enjoyed it. It is the story of a family of Faathings from the planet Faa, who come to earth on a mission. Flowkwee (known on earth as Nigel) writes letters home to his friend Rokbumme describing the dreadfully ugly and disgusting earthlings he encounters at school (who have a mere ONE hopeless head and can't glide or zoom), and his gradual discovery of their way of life.

It is written in a way designed to appeal to the target audience of 7-10 year olds, with lots of toilet references (Flowkwee is appalled that humans are so poorly evolved as to need to use toilets at all), and amusing character names (Flowkwee's little sister is called Farteeta!). His mother (the only one of his 3 mothers that has come on the mission) struggles to make the family appear normal to human eyes, by buying endless human accessories, so the house is full of toasters, and applying makeup.

There is lots of pseudo-space-alien jargon, which makes for slightly halting reading in parts (and an unconvinced young reader might be put off), but the plot is engaging and rapid moving. If you discuss books with your children then there is lots to talk about as Flowkwee describes human attributes and habits through alien eyes and, for example, begins to realise to his horror that his friend Susan is in fact a girl!

The black-and-white illustrations are appealing, and include a few optical illusions which opened up a whole new area of fascination for my son.

Great book, great ending, highly recommended for competent readers aged 7-10 or as a bedtime story for slightly younger children.
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