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And Now Let's Move into a Time of Nonsense: Why Worship Songs are Failing the Church Paperback – 17 Sep 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: AUTHENTIC (17 Sept. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1850785848
  • ISBN-13: 978-1850785842
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 13.4 x 0.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 86,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Nick Page is a writer, information designer, and creative consultant. He has written a number of books, including street life; The Tabloid Bible; Lord Minimus; BLUE; The Church Invisible; The Longest Week:the truth about Jesus Last Days and The Wrong Messiah: the truth of Jesus of Nazareth He also writes regular articles for Youthwalk, Christianity and Renewal, and works for a number of charities and NGOs. He and his wife, Claire, have three daughters and live in Eynsham in Oxfordshire, England.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By P. Hutchinson on 14 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
I had seen this book on bookshelves years ago, but had put off buying and reading it, because I assumed from the title that it was a satirical book - poking fun and calling "no clothes, Mr Emperor", but taking an essentially cynical approach. I've done plenty of poking fun at contemporary worship in years past, but it's easy to be cynical - it's harder to demonstrate a better way of doing things.

Having now read the book, this was an unfair impression. This is a constructive critique of the lyrical content of modern worship. There are no cheap shots taken here. (There's not even any criticism of poorly put together music, which you might have expected. Instead Mr Page commends in passing the musical quality which many praise bands aspire to - "great tunes, shame about the words"). Instead, this is a passionate plea for why modern worship needs to seek out thoughtful lyrical content, as well as showing some of the cultural reasons why we've let ourselves down in this respect. It's written by someone who loves modern worship, but often gets annoyed by it.

This is thought provoking and readable - I plan on recommending it to all the other guys on my worship leading team. As a previous reviewer pointed out, it's aimed at songwriters, but I think it's also good for challenging the average worship leader to seek out lyrical quality.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Alan Meban on 15 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thought of writing worship songs, but don’t know where to start?
Wondered why when you bring your friends to your trendy youth service, they look as bemused as if you had made them sing metrical psalms unaccompanied?
Then this short, accessible and funny book might help you. If you’ve ever questioned whether these really are the days of Elijah, and particularly if the thought never crossed your mind, read this book.
It made me think hard, laugh out loud, and resolve to have a go at writing REALLY modern worship songs.
And if Nick Page can get respected artists like Graham Kendrick and Andy Flannagan to supply quotes for the book's back cover, then his opinion is worth reading.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Oliver Lea on 22 May 2007
Format: Paperback
I spotted this book a week after griping to my wife about the platitudinous lyrics of some of the latest songs introduced in our church. So I snapped it up and read it in a weekend.

Nick Page has hit the nail on the head, although in places I feel he doesn't even go far enough. Perhaps the subjective nature of his chosen topic forced him to tread more carefully than I wanted him to.

The sting in the tail was realising that I myself, as a worship songwriter, had committed more of the crimes listed than I thought. I have since given some proper time to revising many of my own lyrics.

The tripe songs are now more bearable in church because I know I'm not the only one who feels that way about them - but more than that, I'm able to better enter into the spirit of the genuinely good worship songs because I'm better able to understand what went into them.

NOTE: This book seems to be marketed at anybody and everybody, but there are large sections of it that will probably only be of particular interest to those who write songs themselves.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This short book presents an interesting critique of the worship song genre from someone who believes in its worth and potential. Page's focus is on the lyrics only and he explores numerous areas in which he finds worship songs to be confusing, deliberately opaque, or downright silly. In the conclusion, he offers a range of ideas that ought to commend themselves to any writer of hymns or worship songs. He has a light-hearted style, which reads very easily, and each chapter concludes with a letter from a fictional stereotyped worship song writer to his publisher to highlight some of the problems Page perceives in the genre.

While in many ways I enjoyed this book and found it thought-provoking, I came away feeling that it might have done more to assist its case. Early on, Page says that his publishers were very reticent about him using actual examples in the text, so he therefore largely avoids this. While many interested readers might easily be able to go away and look up examples for themselves in several books that Page mentions, this lack of examples is nonetheless frustrating. It would have been good to have had some detailed analyses of texts that he considered particularly good or bad; overall, it's very clear that he's writing in a spirit of constructive criticism, so I think this would have been achievable without causing significant offence. Second, while the focus on lyrics is admirable and understandable, I think that Page allows the music of worship songs to get off rather lightly. By and large, he seems to assume that worship songs are musically good. Some further critical engagement would have helped here too - for just as there are good and bad, approachable and inaccessible texts, so there are good and bad tunes for congregational use.
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