Buy Used
£4.55
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Let's Build!: Why We Need Five Million New Homes in the Next 10 Years Paperback – 20 Sep 2006

4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.00 £4.55



Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: audacity; First Edition edition (20 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955383005
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955383007
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 17 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,862,986 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Publisher

audacity organises authoritative international research, large
conferences on pressing development issues, has a provocative website -
audacity.org - and publishes a dynamic school of writers, public
speakers and photographers. Let's Build! is the first in a new series of
publications

From the Inside Flap

Sponsored by the Modern Masonry Alliance. They develop and
promote masonry construction - the bricks, blocks, and stone; the cement
and mortar which bind them together; the researchers and technicians
advancing the industry; the men and women who build masonry homes,
buildings and structures. For more information visit
modernmasonry.co.uk

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jessie Henderson on 10 Oct. 2006
Format: Paperback
If you've ever wondered about crazy house-price inflation or why reasonably paid workers can't afford houses in the area, town or country, where they live and work,read Let's Build (it's also very readable and entertaining!) James Heartfield goes through all the reasons why we aren't building enough houses for people to live in, which, of course, also means rocketing prices. There's the planning regulations which are 30, if not 50 years old. There's the green-and-pleasant-land ideas of the planners, the architects and builders on government quangos and the civil servants and members of government also - many enjoy the Georgian- house- in- the- town- and- country- cottage lifestyle themselves. There's the old Town Bad, Country Good idea, even though towns are where 80% of us live. What do we need? 50 million homes in the next ten years,

Heartfield says. And says how it can be done, but first reason has to prevail among government officials, planners and architects. James Heartfield has stood up and said 'The Emperor has no clothes.' A good read for anybody and even more if you're struggling to buy in a booming market that always overtakes you, like in some bad dream where you can't quite catch the train - and perhaps if you're sitting in your house, wondering why you're getting rich on paper but wondering where your children are going to live.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr dodgedollar on 12 April 2010
Format: Paperback
Quite a protracted read with lots of historical "titbits".

I think the veil is well and truely pulled aside on this absurd and damaging statute; "The Town and Country Planning Act 1947".

The guy (James Heartfield) certainly uses the biggest demolition ball he can to refute the so called "purpose" of this, quite frankly, mad legislation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By NH on 17 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
... But thought provoking nonetheless. James Heartfield believes that the solution to the housing crisis in the UK is to be found in the construction of 5 million plus new homes, at ten to the hectare, over the greenbelt in the south east and doing away with the the planning laws (as we know them), in the process. In making such an argument his is an unusual voice - reflecting a hotchpotch of political opinions, a mixture of thatcherite libertarianism and social democratic optimism.

It is a very readable book, it's argument is sometimes difficult to follow but it does fit together. His main criticism is an attack on the governments policy of restricting the development of greenfield land, in favour of land that is essentially being reused: 'brownfield' sites in planning terms. What he believes this has led to is inner city areas being regenerated at great expense with dubious social consequences - tiny flats, high house prices and cramped urban conditions. He argues that this situation has come about due to an irrational committment to the seperation of 'town' and 'country', the product of a nation dwelling in the past and not looking to the future, and the direction of architects, planners and politicians that people should live on top of each other and take public transport everywhere - political beliefs dressed up in the language of sustainable development and environmentalism that are extremely profitable if you are in the loop.

So far, so good. The problem is that, whilst his radical alternative vision is welcome, it strikes me that it would never work on a practical level.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. J. W. Owen on 4 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was written in 2006 so since the bursting of the sub-prime mortgage bubble we now have the benefit of hindsight. The drivers for prices were clearly not planning regulations. Nothing changed in planning regulations when prices doubled in 4 years earlier in the decade. The only thing that's keeping prices up is 0.5% interest rates and £200billion of quantitative easing and that is failing miserably. The end result of population growth and whatever construction has or hasn't happened has actually been a steady and clear decline in household sizes over the previous decades rather than the opposite!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback