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Let Them Eat Carbon: The Price of Failing Climate Change Policies, and How Governments and Big Business Profit From Them Paperback – 18 Aug 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Biteback Publishing (18 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849541167
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849541169
  • Product Dimensions: 20.1 x 13 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 456,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matthew Sinclair is the Chief Executive of the TaxPayers' Alliance (TPA) in London. He has produced a range of pioneering and influential economic policy research on everything from fiscal issues to healthcare and climate change. That work has had a major impact in Britain and around the world with prominent coverage in newspapers from the The Sun and the Daily Mail to the Wall Street Journal, the Australian and the Daily Telegraph. It has been cited in debates in the House of Commons and committees in the United States Senate.

He has also represented the TPA frequently on radio, television - with appearances on the BBC News Channel, Sky News, Bloomberg, Fox News, CNBC, the Daily Politics and Newsnight - and in person at a range of events both in the UK and abroad - in Rome, Washington DC, Brussels, Strasbourg and New York.

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Review

This book offers a great insight into the increasingly important but poorly understood world of climate change policy. Anyone who wants to understand how they are affected, and what can be done about the gross failure and exorbitant cost of politicians attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, will find it invaluable. --Lord Lawson, author of An Appeal to Reason

"A terrifically well-researched, well-argued and persuasive exposition of the huge economic and personal costs of our current energy policy. Read it. And heed it. --Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser, Arbuthnot Banking Group; former Head of the Policy Unit, Institute of Directors

"A terrifically well-researched, well-argued and persuasive exposition of the huge economic and personal costs of our current energy policy. Read it. And heed it. --Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser, Arbuthnot Banking Group; former Head of the Policy Unit, Institute of Directors

This book offers a great insight into the increasingly important but poorly understood world of climate change policy. Anyone who wants to understand how they are affected, and what can be done about the gross failure and exorbitant cost of politicians attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, will find it invaluable. --Lord Lawson, author of An Appeal to Reason

"A terrifically well-researched, well-argued and persuasive exposition of the huge economic and personal costs of our current energy policy. Read it. And heed it. --Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser, Arbuthnot Banking Group; former Head of the Policy Unit, Institute of Directors

This book offers a great insight into the increasingly important but poorly understood world of climate change policy. Anyone who wants to understand how they are affected, and what can be done about the gross failure and exorbitant cost of politicians attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, will find it invaluable. --Lord Lawson, author of An Appeal to Reason

"A terrifically well-researched, well-argued and persuasive exposition of the huge economic and personal costs of our current energy policy. Read it. And heed it. --Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser, Arbuthnot Banking Group; former Head of the Policy Unit, Institute of Directors

This book offers a great insight into the increasingly important but poorly understood world of climate change policy. Anyone who wants to understand how they are affected, and what can be done about the gross failure and exorbitant cost of politicians attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, will find it invaluable. --Lord Lawson, author of An Appeal to Reason

"A terrifically well-researched, well-argued and persuasive exposition of the huge economic and personal costs of our current energy policy. Read it. And heed it. --Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser, Arbuthnot Banking Group; former Head of the Policy Unit, Institute of Directors

This book offers a great insight into the increasingly important but poorly understood world of climate change policy. Anyone who wants to understand how they are affected, and what can be done about the gross failure and exorbitant cost of politicians attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, will find it invaluable. --Lord Lawson, author of An Appeal to Reason

About the Author

MATTHEW SINCLAIR is Director of the Taxpayers Alliance. He is the editor of How to Cut Public Spending (and Still Win an Election).

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Edmund on 19 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
A very interesting book. This is not yet another book that argues incessantly about the Science of Artificial Global Warming and it is not the tub thumping Littlejohn style book the title may suggest
. Rather it's a very thoughtful and interesting take on the policy issues one that mostly assumes of a several degree rise in world temperature , exactly that which the British Government and the UN agree on the (IPPC predictions). It argues very compelling that even taking into account the policies designed to prevent this most of all but not exclusively in the UK and EU just do not make sense. His points include
-the supposed costs don't take enough account of time and mitigation even given the IPPC predictions
- That when balanced with the enormous economic cost of more expensive energy the costs of Climate Change look a lot less daunting.
-How terribly expensive the ways we're trying to reduce Carbon consumption are- the Uk goverment seems to give higher subsidies the more expensive the low carbon energy is!
- I thought particularly compelling that given how outside the EU , and to a large degree the UK there is so little attempts e , unilateralism is pointless 'high carbon' industry will just move to China or wherever
He also tackles a series of arguments in favour of the making carbon based energy expensive- his particularly convincing on how green jobs are a myth- any jobs created by more expensive 'green' energy will be outweighed by job losses.

At the same time he does so by and large in a fair mannered way sadly lacking on both sides of this very important area.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By shottup on 10 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
There is some really solid information here that is not easily found in everyday media. Read it and be informed and make up your own mind knowing that there are no easy answers. This book is challenging and there are no soft answers but Sinclair does
come up with some uncomfortable challenges on how the UK government is spending our money in ways that other governments around the world are not.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By P. Henrick on 2 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
This intelligently written book takes the emotion out of the climate change question. No doubt the title will cause many environmentalists to fume, but this book does not deal with the science of climate change; it is a calm and well researched analysis of the misguided policies of the West in response to the threat. What this book shows is that lots of organisations are making lots of money out of these policies (at the expense of consumers - you and me) whilst westeren jobs are being exported to the developing economies (and hence having no effect on reducing CO2 emissions). Matthew Sinclair gives us alternatives to these counterproductive policies - but will the EU monolith listen?
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Petch on 22 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The sheer lunacy of the European and American fiscal policy for promoting "Green energy" is encapsulated in a quotation on page 264 of this book " Unlike traditional commodities, which sometime during the course of their market must be delivered to someone in physical form, the carbon market is based on the lack of delivery of an invisible substance to no one." , The author adds the deceptively neutral remark *The integrity of the scheme depends on the credibility of the validations," Having neatly set the scene he then demonstrates how the carbon market not only rewards dishonesty and corruption, it is as though its architects have perversely designed it to ensure such vices should be widespread, but also does nothing to achieve the goals which are supposed to justify its existence.

Many of the arguments in this book have been made elsewhere by other authors ( the inefficiencies and expense of renewable energy; the mirage of "green jobs" created on the back of massive public subsidy which do not have a deleterious effect on the ordinary job market;the wilful blindness of our politicians to the intentions and expectations of developing countries). The added value in this book is that it brings all these elements together and using very plain, sometimes pungent, language and sticking closely to hard economic facts shows the extent of our current folly. It would be nice to think that senior officials in the Department of Energy and climate change would each a receive a copy in their Christmas stocking and be made to read it. But I fear that too much political capital has been invested in the new pseudo- religion of sustainabiity for it to be taken into account.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Parahandy on 14 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
In this thoughtful, well researched and utterly convincing book, Matthew Sinclair,carefully avoids the often sterile and polarised debate on whether the the underlying science of climate change is well founded or not.

He concentrates instead on describing the policies developed to deal with climate change, identifying those who promote and benefit from these policies and those who do not. He then analyses whether these policies are effective and good value for money.

It is hard to read all of this without a growing sense of indignation. The beneficiaries are almost totally undeserving and the losers are pretty much all of the rest of us. We are all increasingly paying for it all in higher electricity bills, lost jobs, reduced quality of life and actual poverty - and it is all almost totally ineffective and of extremely limited and dubious value.

This is an important book. Politicians and many of their civil servants may find it a hard read, but if they do not read and learn from it, their electorate certainly should.
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