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Les avintur' dé Tintin : Les berlokes del Castafiore (French) Album – 16 Nov 2005


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Album, 16 Nov 2005
£15.50 £25.31
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


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About the Author

Hergé  (Georges Remi) was born in Brussels in 1907. Over the course of 54 years he completed 23 albums of The Adventures of Tintin series, which is now considered to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, comics series of all time. With translations published in over 80 languages, more than 230 million copies sold worldwide and a Hollywood movie to its name, Tintin dominates the Comics and Graphic Novels chart even today. Sadly, Hergé died in 1983, leaving his 24th album, Tintin and Alph-Art, unfinished, but his hero continues to be one of the most iconic characters in both adult and children’s fiction.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Amazon.com: 8 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The Castafiore Emerald 3 July 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is probably the least well known and appreciated of Tintin's adventures. Tintin and Captain Haddock receive a visit from the overbearing opera singer/diva Bianca Castafiore. Many humorous incidents ensue as Bianca is hounded by the press and ends up losing her fabulous emerald. The situation is complicated by the arrival of gypsies to Captain Haddock's home whose presence arises suspicion over the disappearance of Bianca's jewels.
This is the only Tintin adventure where Tintin does not journey to distant lands for his adventures - the action is all sentenced around his home. As a result there is not the normal pace and excitment normally present in Tintin and perhaps this is why the book is not so popular with younger readers. However the story is still excellent in a more subtle way. Firstly the handling of the gypsies in the book is very sensitive and not prejudiced which is certainly not in keeping with the period in which the book was written. The gypsies are not depicted as a band of thieving rogues but a group of people abandoned by all sections of society. Herge plays very well on the inherent prejudices of the characters of the book very well throughout to give the gypsies a sympathetic representation. In this respect the book is excellent for young children since it will give them a broader view of the many peoples of the world. Secondly the subject of press intrusion is dealt with very well throughout the book. The visiting opera singer Bianca Castafiore is followed by journalists and her equivocal attitude to the press is hilarious - she embraces one magasine yet hates another simply because she didn't like one of the pictures of her which was published in it. Then of course there is the actual mystery of the emerald. Unlike other Tintin books the main theme seems to be fairly trifling and merely a source of continuity for the book. The reader is not engaged by the emerald's disappearance and in the end the thief turns out to be ..... (I won't spoil it). The illustrations in the book are particularly detailed and lush. This was Herge's ninteenth Tintin book and thus his style is established and refined as are his racial prejudices. In fact by now Herge was a champion of the anti-racism cause.
The Castafiore Emerald is probably one of Herge's most mature works. Although there is a story, this is inconsequential when compared to the other racial and political issues and the rich characters. Because of this fact the book would probably not be so engaging for younger readers but would certainly be diverting for older children and indeed educational in many ways.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Another Herge masterpiece 2 July 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a classic chapter in Tintin's life - or more to the point: Captain Haddock's life, for his relationship with Castafiore is explored over the main plot - a mystery surrounding her lost jewels. The artwork is, as always, superb and the subtleties endless. The disillusioned accompanist is a great touch, and we can share the Haddock's discomfort at having to spend countless days in his once peaceful abode, at the mercy of Castafiore's shrill voice. It's great to go back to the original French versions - though the English translations are fine, noone can fully replicate the original intention of Herge, the master.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Madame Castafiore descends upon Captain Haddock's home 23 May 2003
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit that after going to the Moon and rescuing his friend Chang in Tibet, the stay at home Tintin adventure "Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" ("The Castafiore Emerald") is relatively tame. It begins with Tintin and Captain Haddock out for a walk and discovering a band of gypsies camped near the rubbish dump. This offends the good captain, who offers the gypsies the use of a large meadow near his hall. However, no good deed goes unpunished and he receives a telegram announcing the imminent arrival of Bianca Castafiore, the Milanese Nightingale. Meanwhile, the broken step on the front staircase earns Haddock a badly sprained ankle and the opportunity to roll around the adventure in a wheelchair. The diva and her entourage then descend upon the hall, literally adding insult to injury by giving the captain the gift of a parrot.
As Castafiore repeatedly points out, she has brought along her jewels, including an emerald given the signora by the Maharajah of Gopal. The gypsy fortuneteller had already predicted the theft of the jewels and we expect her prophecy to come true, even though Castafiore is constantly yelling about her jewels missing. But you know that sooner or later this is going to come to pass and then it will be up to our intrepid reporter to solve the case and save the day. Meanwhile, Captain Haddock's life continues to be a string of minor misfortunes and misunderstands thanks to Castafiore, Professor Tournesol, the parrot, Dupont and Dupond, and the unwillingness of the local repairman to come out and fix that step.
"Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" derives its comedy from the clash of characters with Tintin staying out of the way for the most part. Of course, by this time in the series Hergé is completely comfortable with his cast of characters, which shows in the interplay, although I admit the diva is not my cup of tea. I just happen to really like the way Hergé represents other lands, so having him stay around the captain's house just seems to me to be an interlude from the main adventures. Still, "Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" is well worth the read Hergé does a delightful take on that new fangled invention, the television. Final Note: I like Hergé's quaint cover, with Castafiore singing for the cameras while a smiling Tintin reminds us to be quiet during the performance.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Castafiore Emerald 3 July 2000
By Jonnie Berger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is probably the least well known and appreciated of Tintin's adventures. Tintin and Captain Haddock receive a visit from the overbearing opera singer/diva Bianca Castafiore. Many humorous incidents ensue as Bianca is hounded by the press and ends up losing her fabulous emerald. The situation is complicated by the arrival of gypsies to Captain Haddock's home whose presence arises suspicion over the disappearance of Bianca's jewels.
This is the only Tintin adventure where Tintin does not journey to distant lands for his adventures - the action is all sentenced around his home. As a result there is not the normal pace and excitment normally present in Tintin and perhaps this is why the book is not so popular with younger readers. However the story is still excellent in a more subtle way. Firstly the handling of the gypsies in the book is very sensitive and not prejudiced which is certainly not in keeping with the period in which the book was written. The gypsies are not depicted as a band of thieving rogues but a group of people abandoned by all sections of society. Herge plays very well on the inherent prejudices of the characters of the book very well throughout to give the gypsies a sympathetic representation. In this respect the book is excellent for young children since it will give them a broader view of the many peoples of the world. Secondly the subject of press intrusion is dealt with very well throughout the book. The visiting opera singer Bianca Castafiore is followed by journalists and her equivocal attitude to the press is hilarious - she embraces one magasine yet hates another simply because she didn't like one of the pictures of her which was published in it. Then of course there is the actual mystery of the emerald. Unlike other Tintin books the main theme seems to be fairly trifling and merely a source of continuity for the book. The reader is not engaged by the emerald's disappearance and in the end the thief turns out to be ..... (I won't spoil it). The illustrations in the book are particularly detailed and lush. This was Herge's ninteenth Tintin book and thus his style is established and refined as are his racial prejudices. In fact by now Herge was a champion of the anti-racism cause.
The Castafiore Emerald is probably one of Herge's most mature works. Although there is a story, this is inconsequential when compared to the other racial and political issues and the rich characters. Because of this fact the book would probably not be so engaging for younger readers but would certainly be diverting for older children and indeed educational in many ways.
Tintin - In French! What a treat! 6 Sep 2012
By Minerva - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very nice hardcover edition, good clear inks, strong paper, excellent content! Tintin - I grew up reading these French comics, both in French and English - to double the pleasure. Each is an adventure by our young, ageless, intrepid adventurer and his loyal white fox terrier - Milou or Snowy. Other characters like Captain Haddock (spoof on the British), Prof Calculus, the two bumbling dyslexic detective twins: Thompson and Thomson (Dupont and Dupond in French??), Nestor the penultimate faithful butler of Marlinspike (Moulinsart in French), are some of the regulars in every story. Then there are funny characters like Bianca Castafiore, and evil villains like the Greek Rastapopulous (?), etc that make this a delight for every adult, and a must-read for every child.

One thing about Herge - the actual Hindi, or Chinese or other language used in the comics, actually do translate perfectly into cuss words or correct phrases in that language! This little detail is a gem!

One other thing - Herge was a Belgian cartoonist and in his era, they had the Belgian Congo and colonies. Blacks, Arabs, Indians, Nepalese, Chinese, Eskimos, Native Americans, were not part of white culture those days, still much misunderstood and held at arm's length as 'foreigners'. I dare say that they also did the same with Whites. There is no malice in the comics, but you may see slight elements of racism. Take it for what it is - an outdated viewpoint - but do explain that to the kids. Its like not reading Gone with the Wind because of their treatment of blacks and KKK. Still a good novel, but needs to be seen in that light so it does not affect children's self image negatively.

If you did not read Tintin when young you had a deprived childhood! So make up for it now and start your collection of these adventure comics.
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