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Les Revenants Soundtrack [VINYL] Soundtrack

4.8 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

Price: £14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.

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Product Features

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Product details

  • Vinyl (21 Feb. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Import
  • ASIN: B00B1LRBMC
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,157 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Product Description

BBC Review

When two 18th century manuscripts of the Seven Words of Christ came to light in 1930, attributed by copyists to “Sig. Pergolese”, a debate was sparked as to their authenticity.

Was it indeed a work by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, composer of the Stabat Mater? Or, had it simply been misattributed? No one could say for sure.

The conductor Hermann Scherchen tried to shift the attention back to the quality of the work itself, calling it “one of the most heartfelt works of art, full of profound tenderness and an all-conquering sense of beauty”.

However, unattributed 18th century works don't tend to rack up a great deal of performances, regardless of their profundity, and this one was no exception.

Further sets of manuscript parts were found over the years. But still it wasn't until 2009, when musicologist Reinhard Fehling discovered a set of performance manuscripts, that the music could finally be traced back to Pergolesi without an actual autograph score.

Subsequently, the work was given its concert premiere at the Beaune Festival in July 2012, and this world-first recording was made a few days later.

Listening to the work, it's hard to see what the authenticity hoo-hah was about. Certainly it's very different to Pergolesi's sublime Stabat Mater. But there are plenty of his stylistic thumbprints.

This “heartfelt work of art” is indeed as wonderful as Scherchen described. Scored for four solo vocalists, trumpet, two horns, harp, strings and basso continuo, the Seven Words of Christ is a cycle of seven cantatas, each consisting of two arias. Recitatives are kept to a minimum.

Essentially a dialogue between Christ on the cross and the “Anima” (Faithful Soul), the tone is reverent, devotional, with some striking instrumental symbolism injecting some unusual colouring.

A solo horn denotes Christ's kingliness, muted trumpet symbolises his veiled divinity as he suffers on the cross, and a focus on the timbre of violas over violins adds further melancholy.

Most of all, though, the work is beautiful, and its deeply spiritual loveliness has been realised in a fine period performance. Certainly, it won't be languishing in dusty libraries any more.

It is, in its own way, just as sublime as the Stabat Mater, and René Jacobs and his musicians have given it a comprehensive rehabilitation.

--Daniel Ross

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Big Jim TOP 100 REVIEWER on 25 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD
This is classic soundtrack stuff, a lot of keyboard and picked guitar driven tracks with washes of strings, brushed drumwork, the odd bit of fuzzy guitar etc. We do however also have a country tinged track in What are they doing in Heaven... but theree are also tracks which are maybe more typical Mogwai, quiet, louder, loud then quiet again. Eagle Tax springs to mind for this and the album closer Wizard Motor is a kitchen sink and all track but on the whole this is one of those albums where soundscapes and mood are predominant, an air of menace tinging the experience without it ever quite becoming fright night. This is an album to play once, then immediately play again as new nuances become apparent and then play it a third time with the lights off.
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Format: Audio CD
I'll admit that until The Returned started on TV, all I knew about Mogwai was the fact that they had a pretty awesome name. But the music for the TV program stuck out for me from the first episode, especially the wonderfully delicate yet punchy opening credits theme.

I'm already a fan of ambient music from the likes of Brian Eno, so if I had to make a comparison I'd describe Mogwai's soundtrack as being a darker cousin to Eno's stuff. Most of the tracks are quietly ominous, but easy to listen to and enjoy for their inventive and memorable melodies. There's really only one *uplifting* track, 'Special N' - most definitely one of my favourites, and a nice refresher before plunging back into the brooding mystery of The Returned's other music. Aside from 'Special N', the stand-out tracks are 'Hungry Face' (the opening credits theme), 'Modern' (very catchy electronic track) and 'Wizard Motor'. You've got to love the names. 'Wizard Motor' is surely the most recognisable track after 'Hungry Face'; it accompanies many of The Returned's more dramatic scenes, and whenever I listen to it I can't avoid remembering the end of the first episode when we get a disturbingly immersive view of Camille's school coach plunging down the mountainside.

The only track I don't like out of the whole album is 'What Are They Doing In Heaven Today?'. I found hearing a lyrical song at the very end of an instrumental album to be jarring, and it wasn't helped by the singer's rather drawling, monotone delivery. Apart from that, 'Les Revenants' is an unblemished piece of musical delight, great for listening to in the background (especially for writing) or just listening for the sake of listening. Recommended.
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By mandynolan TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Aug. 2013
Format: Audio CD
I have found this to be a beautiful album....atmospheric ........I like many others enjoyed the TV series and the soundtrack enhanced my enjoyment.....when listening to the full tracks you are pulled in by their beauty.....I like Mogwai's stuff anyway but particulerly enjoyed this.......
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Yes, this is fine if you like "quiet" atmospheric Mogwai, such as Music For a Forgotten Future from Hardcore Will Never Die. If you're looking for loud Mogwai, put on Batcat. There are 12 short quiet instrumentals - no long epics. Plus "What are they doing in heaven today", a "traditional arrangement" with vocals. Then the last track "Wizard Motor" is more of a normal Mogwai album track, and reminds me of White Noise. 50 minutes of stuff overall.
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Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
Having watched the TV series, which I think is great (can't wait for the next series to start), I thought I'd get the soundtrack and I'm really pleased I did, excellent. If you're a fan if the series or even if not and enjoy good music, BUY IT! You won't be disappointed. I actually bought the MP3 version, a perfect download
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I had no previous acquaintance with the work of Mogwai before I began watching "Les Revenants" on Channel 4 this summer. Their music absolutely made the story come alive (if that's not an inappropriate word) for me. It has haunted me now for two months. Since acquiring the CD I have been listening to it in the car on my commute to work and, frankly, it is affecting my perception of the world. (I write this in the aftermath of two recent significant bereavements.) This is spare and austere music in keeping with its solemn subject. The elements are simple. Repetitive motives suggest obsessive behaviour, e.g. of persistent grief as well as Serge's pathological actions as a serial killer. Distortion and feedback have the effect of fingernails on a chalk-board. Use of intervals such as compound augmented fourths (the infamous "diabola in musica") heighten the sense of encroaching anxiety. The cumulative effect is devastating - for example, on the first track, in which the glockenspiel suggests the vulnerability of "Victor" (his real name, we eventually discover, is Louis) and Camille, the two children among the "returned"; the lyrical 'cello speaks of the sadness of the bereaved, whilst the insistent drumming suggests the anger, bewilderment and frustration both of the untimely dead and those who mourn them.

The (presumably) ironic inclusion of a version of the early 20th Century free-church hymn "What are they doing in Heaven today?" poignantly highlights the dilemma faced by all the characters, living and dead, at the end of the first series, as the returned have patently not been existing in any kind of beatific afterlife during their absence - much as the bereaved people who miss them might have wished they had been - and its inclusion makes the double-suicide of the Koretzkys even more painful, even though this track was not included in the TV series (as far as I can remember).
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