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  • Leonard Bernstein - Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 1-9, Overtures, Violin Concerto - Sony Classical Masters
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Leonard Bernstein - Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 1-9, Overtures, Violin Concerto - Sony Classical Masters Box set


Price: £13.14 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (4 April 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 6
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Sony Music Classical
  • ASIN: B003S0IJWA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 114,023 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By WPN on 4 April 2011
As any educated buyer will know, no complete set of Beethoven symphonies is entirely ideal. I own six sets, ranging from Toscanini to Vanska, all of which are to be commended for a variety of reasons. For me, this survey by Bernstein is the most consistently dramatic, a real "tour de force". Granted, some of the "lighter" symphonies sometimes lack the polish and crispness that one might hear from a more contemporary period instrument ensemble. However, the guile and gusto of these weighty readings prove to be an equally engaging approach, breathing new life these works (no mean feat, given that they are so well-known). Bernstein's 7th rivals Kleiber's famous account with the VPO for sheer intoxicating excitement, and the 3rd is extremely well-paced. The 9th, too, is wonderfully ebullient, as is the Finale of the 5th. (Even the rather sedate tempo of the 5th's first movement begins to grow on the listener after a while.) What's more, the overtures and Isaac Stern's memorable rendition of the Violin Concerto make for some excellent bonus listening. A real treat!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Kernaghan on 20 Mar. 2012
Beethoven Symphonies 1 - 9. New York Philharmonic Orchestra and Julliard Chorus. With Martina Arroyo, Norman Scott, Regina Sarfaty and Nicholas di Virgilio. Conducted by Leonard Bernstein. Recorded from 1962 to 1969. CBS/Sony:

Bernstein's first cycle with the New York Philharmonic is thoroughly powerful and deeply committed. Almost all of the performances are enjoyable and Bernstein's way with this great music is distinctive. The individual performances range from transcendent musical experiences to ordinary takes. Yet Bernstein's firm vision of each of these works merits hearing. The one major disappointment is the Ninth. Whilst Bernstein secures some taut and dramatic playing, the choral and solo singing is poor. Unfortunately, the Julliard Chorus do not meet the demands of their task and none of the four soloists sing well, make any lasting impression, or blend well as a quartet. In particular, the tenor sounds like he is going to explode in the high register. He sounds like a Wagnerian tenor who has just returned from singing Tristan and Tannhauser in one day. Bernstein's speeds are also a little fast in the finale and some of the great moments in this masterpiece are obscured as a result. Additionally, the orchestral playing in the finale is less impressive than earlier on.

However, in the Fifth Symphony, Bernstein scores one of the truly inspired interpretations of his career. This is Beethoven playing from another world: to say that I was moved by this performance is an understatement. Critics would dismiss this interpretation as eccentric and I suppose it is Bernstein's slow tempi that are responsible for that rebuke. I found that these speeds present more vividly the drama and stamping force of Beethoven's great creation.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Snograss on 19 Jan. 2012
Not only does the tempo of the first movement of the 5th grow on you, but if, like me you grew up with this recording (it was the first record I ever bought at 10), the usual faster tempo one hears seems rushed and unnuanced. I was listening to my von Karajan recording the other day and thought it sounded so weak and vapid, that I went in search of the Bernstein NYSO version and imagine my delight in finding all the symphonies, etc., for what I would gladly have paid for what I consider the best recording of just one! I am looking forward to hearing all the rest.
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