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Lensbaby Composer Nikon Lens

14 customer reviews

RRP: £220.00
Price: £178.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £41.01 (19%)
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by Direct savings and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
2 new from £171.60
  • Nikon F Mount
  • Double Glass Optic included
  • Focus Type: Manual
  • Interchangeable magnetic aperture disks
  • Compatible with the Optic Swap System
£178.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 3 left in stock. Sold by Direct savings and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Lensbaby Composer Nikon Lens + Lensbaby Case - Composer/Muse + Lensbaby Creative Aperture Kit 2
Price For All Three: £208.48

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Product details

  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 6.4 x 6.4 cm ; 154 g
  • Boxed-product Weight: 222 g
  • Item model number: LBCN
  • ASIN: B001GCUC72
  • Date first available at Amazon.co.uk: 21 Oct. 2008
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 65,601 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics)

Product Description

Manufacturer's Description

Smooth and Precise; The award-winning Composer is one of our most popular lenses. It includes the Double Glass Optic (installed) and is compatible with all optics in the Lensbaby Optic Swap System. The Composer’s design is based on a ball and socket configuration that delivers smooth creative effects photography with ease. Simply tilt the lens to a desired angle then focus with a manual focusing ring.

The Double Glass Optic provides a pin-sharp Sweet Spot of focus surrounded by blur, with minimum diffusion at all aperture settings.

The Composer is a breeze to use. Simply bend the lens to move the Sweet Spot and then focus.

The Composer stays in its bent position without needing to be locked. If you want to ensure the Composer will not move during an extended shooting session, you can lock the lens's position by rotating the Locking Ring. This locking feature makes the Composer ideal for studio photography or for longer or repeated exposures.Another great feature is the unique barrel focusing ring that automatically dampens (requiring greater rotation to move the optic in and out) as you approach infinity, making it easier to focus on subjects from 10 feet to infinity.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Martin Turner HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 April 2011
The original Lensbaby and Lensbaby 2 were designed to restore a sense of random spontaneity to photography. Holga-esque elements and 'squeeze to focus' meant that every picture you took was in a certain sense a guess, even on a single lens reflex. You can still get something like the original Lensbaby in the form of the Lensbaby Muse, but if you want to retain the extreme blurring and distortion of the original while having a degree of control and repeatability, the Lensbaby Composer is probably what you are looking for.

If you've never used a Lensbaby, it is a relatively low quality compound lens with the front and the back connected not by a rigid tube, but by a flexible collar. With this, you can push and pull the front lens to focus, but also move it off axis, giving you the effects of a Tilt/Shift lens. However, unlike a studio tilt/shift which is designed to give you the maximum in terms of absolute quality, at a significant cost in spontaneity, the Lensbaby throws optical quality to the winds, and gives you something you just move and shoot.

This is all fully manual, of course -- even to the extent that changing the aperture requires you to physically swap out aperture rings. Most modern cameras should be able to do something in the way of auto-exposure, by varying the shutter speed or the ISO, but you may well find that the results are unpredictable -- as is almost everything about a Lensbaby.

If this sounds like a recipe for disaster, think again.
Read more ›
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. CADWELL on 5 Aug. 2009
I looked at this lens long and hard before I bought. But, I'm so glad I did!
I'll be honest though, I'd recommend buying the other optics too. For a further £70 - £90 you can convert the composer into a wide angle, telephoto and macro, covering the range of 20 - 80mm.
That then becomes a very versatile lens, combine that with the creative aperture kit and there are countless combinations and effects to achieve, all with the added tilt shift capability.
The manual apertures really get you thinking about the basics of photography. Beware though, no TTL metering on most SLR's, personally it has made me think more about how the camera works and what you can acheive.
Brilliant product, one that will appear in a lot more camera bags in the future.
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The Lensbaby Composer is certainly like no other lens that you will have used before. Firstly it is a manual lens with no cpu data going to the camera body, and no autofocus. So to use this lens you will need to be proficient in using your camera in manual mode or, if your camera allows it, in Aperture priority metering mode. When I first used the Lensbaby Composer it took me while to get used to the way it worked, but now it is second nature to compose and focus. This lens has a learning curve which is not too steep, and you will be getting good results within a few hours. To change the aperture (f Stop) the lens is provided with a set of aperture disks in the various f stops from 2.8 to 22, these are kept in a small utility tool that has a magnet on one end and a holder on the other which has a 35mm film cap as a closure. To change f stops just use the magnet to lift the disk out, and then just drop a new disk back in, simple. If you are having any problems, Lensbaby have a very good website and Forum, which has an amazing amount of information and examples of users work on. So if you do take the plunge and buy one, expect people to look at you as having gone a bit crazy in buying a lens that moves in as many different directions as you will to get your shot.
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I love this lens. I mostly use it for cityscapes or street photography, it's fully manual so you'll get varying results - don't expect perfect sharpness, this is not the point of this lens (remember the price vs something like a Nikon 50mm 1.4). Creates some very cool images. Lots of accessories to play with, for not much additional money! I have regularly lent this to other photographers who have enjoyed playing with it and then bought their own.
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By Nerdy Bru on 13 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase
This is a very interesting and potentially highly creative addition to the camera.

The pictures can be stunning and very different, I don't think possible to achieve via post shooting software, certainly not as quickly but, it takes time to set up the camera, all manual for Nikon anyway so not aperture, speed control, and the focus is not easy. so time needed, no bad thing perhaps and the outcome when it comes together is amazing.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. G. Bridgeman Clarke TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 27 April 2010
Verified Purchase
I have wanted one of these for ages but was put off by the earlier versions. This is the third incarnation). I think its a bit expensive but what price creativity?

I used this on my two Nikons, a D90 and a D3. There is a difference. With the D90 I get no control over the metering and have to guess exposure. Not too bad if you have a good undertanding of photography but for first timers a bit of a no-no. However, on the D3, the lens metrs with the camera making exposure esay.

The lens firs snuggly in the Nikon lens mount and you have a variety of apperture rings to use. You just ust the included tool to release the aperature ring in the lensbaby and drop another in. Sounds easy but can be a bit fiddily. The lensbaby comes with a f4 aperture ring already installed so thats what I use in most instances.

The lensbaby is so easy to use, but there is no autofocus. You can bend the lens and then when you focus on the sweetspot depending on the agnle of the lens all other parts of the image are out of focus. Wish I could upload an image here to show you but I don't think you can. (If anyone knows how drop me a comments please)

The lensbay is plastic but appears to be sturdy enough for its purpise. Its light and comes with its own little carrying bag. Good news too you can get accessories for close up an a variaty of shaped aperture rings. Costs a bit more but you can have even more fun with this little gem.
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