Le Pigeon: Cooking at the Dirty Bird and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£20.40
  • RRP: £30.00
  • You Save: £9.60 (32%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Le Pigeon: Cooking at the... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £5.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 6 images

Le Pigeon: Cooking at the Dirty Bird Hardcover – 23 Sep 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£20.40
£13.42 £13.10
£20.40 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Le Pigeon: Cooking at the Dirty Bird + Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey
Price For Both: £37.40

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Trade In this Item for up to £5.34
Trade in Le Pigeon: Cooking at the Dirty Bird for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £5.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (23 Sep 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607744449
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607744443
  • Product Dimensions: 22.5 x 3.3 x 28.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

I d heard nothing about this Portland, Oregon institution until the book landed on my desk and utterly awed me. The young chefs draw influence from the Fergus Henderson nose-to-tail school but introduce a whole layer of iconoclastic hipster inspiration. When reading the contents makes you salivate, you know you have a winner." --Tim Hayward, Financial Times

At Le Pigeon, Gabriel Rucker has the opportunity to cook in Oregon a very soulful region where food and wine are in harmony with the terroir. His cuisine is all about balance, with a dash of American nostalgia. He gets it. --Daniel Boulud, chef-owner of Daniel

I absolutely love this book! A behind-the-scenes look at Portland s beloved Le Pigeon restaurant, it s fun, quirky, and delicious. With Gabriel Rucker guiding you through these beautiful recipes, you can t go wrong --April Bloomfield, chef-owner of The Spotted Pig and author of A Girl and Her Pig

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By I. Darren TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 14 Jan 2014
Format: Hardcover
Here is a book that any real foodie will like, even though some of the wonderful photographs might be viewed as a little creepy or scary by many.

So, what do you get from this richly-illustrated, thick tome written by some of the team who create the culinary magic at the Portland, Oregon-based "Le Pigeon" restaurant? Things start with a genuinely interesting little introduction that explains the history of the restaurant to date and, unlike many books, this is not "ego city". Then it is straight to the kitchen to get cooking.

The recipes are split into curiously-named chapters called "Lettuce and Such", "Tongue", "Fat Liver", Little Birds", "Rabbit", "Little Terry", "Big Terry", "Pork", "Horns and Antlers", "Lamb", "Veg" and "Choco, Tart, Profit". Some but not all may be fairly self-explanatory... Many of the recipes will appear "high end" and "exclusive dining" and yet when you look at the ingredients they might be everyday items that the typical consumer would avoid if they saw it in the food store. Not that many people like cooking tongue, for example, yet it sure is a versatile part and a shame to ignore it.

This is a book you need to really read through, at least once, to get the most out of it. There is plenty of strange terminology (at least to this reviewer) and many funny anecdotes tucked away where you least expect them, such as a customer finding a bullet lodged in a long-cooked piece of tongue (!). If you are prepared to "push the envelope" a bit and trust in the authors then you will not be disappointed. This is one of those very few books that can be classed as "truly different", an inner sanctum for foodies and food curious people, yet the authors did not need to rely on tricks or strange food combinations to create this masterpiece.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent cookbook, since the day I bought the Mission Street Food cookbook from Anthony Myint I've been on a quest for something similar, a cookbook that's exciting, makes you do food combinations you would never have thought of and most importantly turn out to be a revelation. This is it, a sexy cookbook that uses out of the ordinary cuts to make extraordinary dishes. I love it and if you're looking for some exciting venture in your kitchen so will you.

PS: All measurements are both in cups and gr & ml.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
An ode to Portland's Le Pigeon Restaurant 17 Sep 2013
By I Do the Speed Limit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Fans of the Le Pigeon Restaurant in Portland, Oregon are going to fall for this lovingly-created book that highlights the best of the first five years of its existence. The story is told not only in the recipes, but in the beautiful pictures and stories and essays that help the reader reminisce.

It is hard to write a review of a restaurant chef's cookbook. How to balance a star rating between stunning talent and superb recipes that work in a restaurant, and what works at home? How to inform a potential cookbook buyer of its at-home-cooking value, without offending the talented chef, the restaurant staff that works so hard, and the restaurant fans? Oftentimes, chefs and restaurant staff are so close to their work, that they don't see that their supplies, their abilities, their facilities are way more sophisticated that what is the norm for a home cook. Please believe me when I say that I don't mean to offend anyone; and if you read my words carefully, I hope you can see that my review is as unbiased and informative as I can make it. It is posted here to help you make an informed choice--whether or not to BUY the book. If I wrote my review as an "advertisement" for the restaurant, I would be writing my review for all the wrong reasons. So, please, if you don't like my better-than-average "I like it, I truly do" four-star rating, let me know where my thinking is wrong by way of a comment below--and not a simple negative vote....

I usually shy away from restaurant chef cookbooks because, while the recipes are always fabulous, they are often works of art and complicated, with long ingredient lists and hard to find (and oftentimes expensive) ingredients. Excuse me, but that is why I "go out" to dinner! I like to cook, but I don't often want to spend all day in the kitchen. I also don't like spending a day shopping for special ingredients, or waiting days for an internet order to arrive. This cookbook falls into that category. So while it is definitely a wonderful and beautiful grouping of recipes, you should be aware that you are not going to find a majority of recipes that you can whip together on a week night. You may want to pick up this book simply because it is a product of your favorite restaurant and its up-and-coming chef OR you might just pass it by because most of the recipes are not simple and easy to prepare. You may want to pick it up for its lessons in creativity, as the chef is definitely insightful and intuitive.

This cookbook is a combination of the laborious works of art that I describe above, plus wonderful (Oregon and Pacific Northwest) sourcing information and tips, plus some good ole' easy favorites. You will find that most of the recipes incorporate ingredients that are plentiful (or popular) in the Pacific Northwest. You will definitely find the Le Pigeon chefs' "keeper" recipes. You want to recreate a dinner you've had there? Then, this book's for you.

The chapter titles provide some insight into the type of recipes included: The book opens with "Lettuce and Such" and it's probably the "tamest" of all. The next chapters get into the meat of things: "Tongue" (lamb, elk, beef, pork); "Fat Liver" (foie gras); "Little Birds" (pigeon, squab, duck, quail, pheasant); "Rabbit" (smoked, in a terrine with eel, braised, chicken-fried, etc.); "Little Terry" ( fried razor clams, Dungeness crab, geoduck, octopus, black scallops, clams, escargot, etc.); "Big Terry" (sea bass, trout, king salmon, swordfish, sturgeon, halibut); "Pork" (belly, cheek, shoulder confit, foot, and a simple roast pork loin); "Horns and Antlers" ( beef cheek, heart, tripe, oxtail, hanger steak, calf's head, sweetbreads, bone marrow, rib-eye and a burger); "Lamb" (ground, shank, neck, belly, brains, etc.); "Veg" (eleven fairly sophisticated vegetable dishes), and last but not least "Choco, Tart, Profit" ( a nice grouping of sorbets, ice creams, a pie and a cake.)

Ingredient lists are long, but precise and accurate. There are full-color pictures for most of the recipes. Layout and type style make the recipe instructions easy to follow.

I picked up this book because I am interested in unusual cuts of pork and beef and in recipes using more unusual meats. From the paragraph above, you can tell I found that plenty of recipes to feed my interest. I won't be buying this book, though: While I consider myself an experienced cook, I am still a home cook. These recipes are too involved for my taste. Plus, I live in Texas, so most of the fresh fish and seafood chapters are out of bounds for me because we don't see much West Coast product here. And the "Fat Liver" chapter I wouldn't use because I'm not going to indulge in foie gras (except on rare occasions when visiting a top notch restaurant).

All in all, it was a very interesting cookbook to browse through, but it is not my style. I had to give it a four-star rating though, because I think it would be of interest to people in and around Portland--and I surely wouldn't want to dissuade those people from considering this book. Plus a lot of work went into creating this book.

**I received a temporary download of this cookbook from the publisher, through NetGalley. I've been scrutinizing and working with this cookbook for about two months.**
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Enjoyable 30 Sep 2013
By I. Darren - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Here is a book that any real foodie will like, even though some of the wonderful photographs might be viewed as a little creepy or scary by many.

So, what do you get from this richly-illustrated, thick tome written by some of the team who create the culinary magic at the Portland, Oregon-based "Le Pigeon" restaurant? Things start with a genuinely interesting little introduction that explains the history of the restaurant to date and, unlike many books, this is not "ego city". Then it is straight to the kitchen to get cooking.

The recipes are split into curiously-named chapters called "Lettuce and Such", "Tongue", "Fat Liver", Little Birds", "Rabbit", "Little Terry", "Big Terry", "Pork", "Horns and Antlers", "Lamb", "Veg" and "Choco, Tart, Profit". Some but not all may be fairly self-explanatory... Many of the recipes will appear "high end" and "exclusive dining" and yet when you look at the ingredients they might be everyday items that the typical consumer would avoid if they saw it in the food store. Not that many people like cooking tongue, for example, yet it sure is a versatile part and a shame to ignore it.

This is a book you need to really read through, at least once, to get the most out of it. There is plenty of strange terminology (at least to this reviewer) and many funny anecdotes tucked away where you least expect them, such as a customer finding a bullet lodged in a long-cooked piece of tongue (!). If you are prepared to "push the envelope" a bit and trust in the authors then you will not be disappointed. This is one of those very few books that can be classed as "truly different", an inner sanctum for foodies and food curious people, yet the authors did not need to rely on tricks or strange food combinations to create this masterpiece. The food speaks for itself.

In some ways the sheer, stark nature of some of the photographs is more "alarming" than the recipes and their textual descriptions. Cooked pigeon legs sticking out of a plastic container is not a typical image for a cookbook, that is for sure. Yet the photographs are artwork in their own right, such as that used to illustrate "Rabbit and Eel Terrine".

It is unfortunate that our usual niggles exist in this book (lack of an estimated preparation/cooking time and use of sole U.S. measures) but this book remains sufficiently different, engaging and detailed that you just want more, more and more. The instructions given are clear, to-the-point but through so as long as you can follow a recipe and don't burn water you would have no problems.

This won't be a book for everybody and if the idea of cooking "less common" ingredients is possibly not for you, consider checking this book out in a bookstore first. There are more "common" ingredient recipes inside too, but for this author at least part of the charm and appeal is the use of "less common" ingredients.

One must underline that this book is capable of being suitable for everybody and not just "elite gastronomes". You might, however, need to be less squeamish or picky and disassociate rabbit as just being something fluffy that hops around a field. If you only consider one out-of-the-ordinary book this year, give some strong consideration to this one.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A trip into the creative process 25 Jan 2014
By Jonny Cuisine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a professional cook with a degree in culinary arts I read a lot of cookbooks and other types of foodie books from Betty Crocker to Charlie Trotter. It's easy for a Chef to become far to serious about food, to intense and then they become off-putting. In the introduction to this book you get a look inside the journey of a Chef from being in over his head to being a 2 time James Beard Award Winner. Chef Rucker has a sense of humor while he goes about cooking. The integrity and care of the ingredients, which is vital, is there but with a touch of whimsy.

True some of the recipes are almost completely inaccessible to the home cook but they provide a look into the professional kitchen that the Food network and Top Chef cannot provide. It takes time and dedication to accomplish what you see on your table as you dine out and this book is an example of the care that goes into it.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Will become a classic... 2 Dec 2013
By NancyG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great restaurant; amazing cookbook. It also has a lovely fabric cover and doesn't come with one of those annoying paper covers.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This is a stellar book 10 Feb 2014
By Celeste Oliver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love this book. It is well written, candid and full of amazing recipes. These guys are masters at their craft and are generous to share their story and their favorite recipes. It is pure inspiration. There are amazing full meal recipes and also a great section in the back with basics like the best blue cheese salad dressing I have every had.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback