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Lazy Days Hardcover – 7 Nov 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus (7 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 178185517X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781855171
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 12.7 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 415,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'There's much to enjoy in Loe's dead-pan comedy' Financial Times.

'Laugh-out-loud, typically distinctive, satirical and hilarious' Vice magazine.

About the Author

Erlend Loe is a Norwegian novelist. His eight books have been translated into over twenty languages. Translators Don Bartlett and Don Shaw have collaborated on two previous novels.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William Jordan on 29 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover
The Telemann family head off on holiday to Bavaria, where Bror Telemann thinks about the theatre (he is a theatre director but his thoughts about the theatre aren't all that focussed!) and daydreams about Nigella Lawson - and pays little attention to his wife and children, though they do impinge on his consciousness, particularly his wife, from time to time. Indeed much of the novel is in the form of dialogue between the Telemanns.

This was, for me, a very amusing novel, which caricatures and exaggerates the exchanges between husband and wife, but also succeeds in striking home in terms of its understanding of human nature.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I note from the publishing details that this was originally published in 2009, and if this is indeed the case, it makes Mr Erland Loe quite prescient in what transpired more recently between Nigella Lawson and Charles Saatchi, and for that fact alone makes it a standout read. He is one of my favourite authors, with a deadpan, often childlike style, which totally suits this short, acidly funny little book, but, like an ice cream bought during a midday sun, it tends to melt away quite soon.
Norwegians, Bror Telemann, his wife Nina and their children are on their summer holidays in Germany and is the account of their fallout during this time. Telemann is a theatre director, who is as pretentious, selfish, neurotic and annoying in a way that only a theatre director can be, a man child who still maintains all Germans are Nazis, harbours sexual fantasies about Nigella Lawson and dreams of liberating her from the clutches of Saatchi, and unwittingly reveals his own anti-Semitism. The conversations between him and his long suffering wife, are frequently hilarious, although often repetitive, and one-note. Appropriately enough, the book is written like a play script, mostly through dialogue, and it might actually work better on stage. 'This is theatre!' as Telemann would probably say, and curiously enough, the characters could easily come from a play Alan Ayckborne
Essentially a novella, it could be read in one sitting, but Telemann is so exasperating a character, it's probably better in small doses. Oh, and the ending is sentimental and fake.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lola TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 Mar. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Ah Erlend Loe, I was forever amused by his "Volvo Lastvagnar" (sadly, not translated into English), and was hoping that "Lazy Days" will deliver the same kind of sarcasm and striking humour. I was disappointed.

Loe's original, dark-humoured narrative is recognisable in this tale of an unhappy and dissatisfied man, forever trying to prove himself in his calling of a director of a true theatre. Telemann, the main character of this short novel, is on holidays with his family in Germany (which he hates, as all things Nazi). Telemann's wife and children try to engage him in hiking and ice-cream eating activities, yet Telemann is much more content spending his days thinking about theatre (compulsively) and Nigella Lawson (even more compulsively). Quite random, right? Erotic scenes involving aforementioned theatre and Nigella were finny in the beginning, and then just cringe-worthy to read. On the whole, "Lazy Days" was an odd read, more so that it was published before the Saatchi-Lawson scandals and revelations.

Overall a fast, unusual read, but I am not sure it is worth the money, truth be told. Three stars if you are generous. Two stars from me.
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Format: Hardcover
A very amusing read! Regular readers of Erlend Loe will know his seemingly naive style and his ability to turn rather heavy themes (such as a male mid-life crisis) into dry yet hilarious humour.

Having read this book in Danish (which is rather close to the original Norwegian) I was surprised to find that the English translation uses the bland title, "Lazy days," instead of the original's awkward but funny "Stille dager i Mixing Part" (Quiet days in Mixing Part.)
The title is a reference to Henry Miller's classic novella, Quiet days in Clichy, and betrays the erotic content in Loe's novel. The "Mixing Part"-part refers to the Google-translated e-mail the Norwegian couple receives from their German hosts where Garmisch Partenkirchen becomes Mixing Parts Churches.
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Format: Hardcover
In Lazy Days Telemann (a theatre director) and his wife Nina and their children go on holiday to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in southern Germany. They are Norwegian and while Nina loves Germany, Telemann thinks it is a Nazi hell and isn't afraid of saying so. So starts some niggling between the couple which eventually results in a crisis. Telemann's mind is on theatre and Nigella Lawson most of the time and manages to alienate himself from the rest of his family. Not as brilliant and inventive as Naive Super but really really funny at times. quite a good read
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