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Last Train Home [DVD]

11 customer reviews

Price: £4.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
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£4.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Directors: Lixin Fan
  • Producers: Mila Aung-Thwin, Daniel Cross
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: Dogwoof
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Oct. 2010
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003ZIZ2RU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,888 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Last Train Home follows a Chinese Family as they leave their daughter and family to look for work in more industrialized areas. They leave the country side and begin working in a cheap clothing factory. The film spans over two years observing the familys struggles for money as they attempt to keep their relationships intact.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Basil Dazzle on 3 Nov. 2010
Format: DVD
This is an amazing documentary featuring the lives of a chinese family over a 3 year period (2006-2008)mainly concentrating on the mass migration that takes place at the chinese new year as 130 million migrant workers attempt to return home for the celebrations.
I've experienced plenty of travel chaos in the UK over the years but nothing like on the scale shown in this film.The scenes showing thousands of people waiting days for tickets and trains will stay with me for a long time and will make the regular 2 hour delays on the M25 seem like a picnic in the park.
The film also highlights the cultural changes that have taken place in China and how they have effected the 3 generations of the featured family.
Marvellous cinematography combined with a very interesting subject make this an essential DVD!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD
A film that does much to illustrate the ever changing demographics of the world we live in today, and how the West has helped fuel the economic leviathan that China has become today. This documentary film follows the Zhang family during the course of several years as they embark on the annual migration of 130 million workers returning to their homes across China for their new year celebrations. This mass movement of people makes the wildebeest migration on the Serengetti look like a meeting for elderly recluses. The mother and father forsake their rural home in Sichuan province, isn't that where Panda bears come from?, to work in the sweat shops further east. Unlike Panda bears who live happily on bamboo shoots, mum and dad try to earn more money through sheer hard work to give their children an education. In doing so they fracture their family unit, with the result that they become alienated from their own daughter, who considers the grandmother to be her true mother. It is a story that clearly happens all over China, and is a moral dilemma that pulls at the heart strings.

It is hard not to be a little cynical and assume that much of the documentary is carefully stage managed, and I guess some of it had to be out of sheer necessity, but there is much that has a real ring of authenticity to it. The family argument is perhaps the biggest case in point, that ends up in a real ding dong domestic with everything but the kitchen sink being thrown. Whew, clearly I am not the only father in this world who has had problems with rebellious teenage daughters. The film contains a memorable scene with one Chinese worker expressing his amazement at the waist sizes of trousers being supplied for the American market.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael on 28 July 2011
Format: DVD
By far the best documentary I have ever seen. A beautiful and tragic film and while there isn't much dialogue the shots and the family story are enough to have you gripped from start to finish. Well done Lixin Fan.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thomas H. Ho on 19 Aug. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Judging by the title,I thought the documentary was just about the struggle the migrant workers had to go through to get on the trains to get home for the New Year - the difficulty in getting the tickets; the crowded conditions on the train; the long arduous journeys; etc. This, of course, is the case brilliantly told, but, unexpectedly, much more.
The focus is on a couple who have left their family behind in the far northwest village of China to find work in the industrialized south. Once a year they struggle to get on the train to get home for the New Year and for the precious little time with their family.
There are 13 million of these migrant workers in China.
The film spans over two years documenting the couple's struggles for money as they bear long separations from their family.
The filmmaker's use of the camera seems magical with a pitch-perfect journalistic eye in demonstrating the plight of the family. The results are a moving insight into the impact of the nation's industrial endeavour on culture, society and individual.
A gem.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By H. Nieuwenhuizen on 3 April 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having lived in China, been amongst similar crowds at railway stations wondering whether you can get a ticket or not, and reading in papers about the plight of these migrant workers (often not getting paid in time before the journey home) and seeing the excitement and involvement in the weeks leading up to the travel I can understand a lot of the feelings. Even with the new high speed trains the problem is still there as the prices are too high (cheap for us westerners) for many migrants. The film flies by and portrays the problems very well and it's like a fly on the wall, only exposed at near the end during the family argument when the misunderstood teenager shouts why are you filming me when she's the victim of her dad's lack of understanding that she's no longer a child. His attitude is no different than many in all societies. Her aims are like all teenagers and it proves how difficult it is to break out of this way of life.
A pity that the parents are so desperate for the children not to have to live their miserable lives that they forget to see their achievements, like their son is fifth in class, not bad in our eyes but rather than complement they almost scold him or how hard they have to work with their grandmother doing the farming chores. A beautiful film and so well made. In some places in the crowds they must have received special treatment by security men like in areas when they cross the barriers but it doesn't lessen the impact of this mad yearly rush home and the daily drudgery of their lives with no prospects for many for the future. I for one am very pleased to have come across this one it highlights one of societies great problems. UK must have seen similar things during our massive industrial growth during the 1800's
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