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The Last Talk With Lola Faye Paperback – 26 May 2011

3.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus (26 May 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857381504
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857381507
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 2.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 827,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'I have long been an admirer of Thomas H. Cook's novels, and The Last Talk with Lola Faye is one of his best yet: an expertly plotted, beautifully written, compelling and suspenseful book' Harlan Coben. (Harlan Coben)

'Thomas H. Cook is a rare jewel of a writer, a powerful storyteller and an elegant stylist. If you are not familiar with his work, you absolutely should be' John Hart. (John Hart)

'A superbly crafted little conceit of a novel in which the author plays mind games with his readers and his characters. Bittersweet' The Times. (The Times)

'Positively haunting ... walks his listeners to the edge of the grave - where he leaves us breathless' New York Times. (New York Times)

From the Inside Flap

The historian and writer Luke Paige is signing his latest work in a bookstore when suddenly, in the queue, he spots a woman he hoped he would never see again. Lola Faye. Her relationship with his father ruined Luke's childhood. Lola's husband took his revenge and shot Luke's father dead, and his mother died soon after.
Lola Faye wants to talk. They meet for a drink, which soon becomes a meal, and then another drink. Slowly, painfully, Luke and Lola revisit the terrible events that have shaped their lives.
The story they reveal is one of the timeless struggle between fathers and sons, of longed-for passion, of hopes and dreams thwarted by fate and circumstance. This is psychological suspense at its best.
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Hardcover.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
In a year when most of the true masters of the American thriller have disappointed, along comes Thomas H. Cook to save the day. Cook writes psychological thrillers of nearly unbearable intensity and stunning originality. When you read Cook you know you are reading a novel that has never been written before, and where it will take you, you cannot guess. His latest - The Last Talk with Lola Fay - is at the very top of his class, there is no greater praise. Set in St Louis during the course of one evening two one-time acquaintances meet for a quiet drink and a talk over old times when they both lived in poverty stricken Glenville, Alabama. As the conversation unfolds the scabs are ripped off old memories, the circumstances of terrible events are called into question, three people die for no good reason and the reader is led to a terrible conclusion, except I defy any reader to correctly guess where he's being led. Written elegiacally as always by America's best crime novelist - or if not the best, there is no better - this is a book that thrills from the moment of unwrapping to a multiplicity of undone chores later. Cook's clarity and jewelled sharpness of metaphor is always a treat, never more so than here. 'Religion is Santa Claus for grown-ups' says Lola Fay. Just read it.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Thomas H Cook is not as well known as he should be. His dark centred mystery books are beautifully written, insistent and memorable.
The Last Talk with Lola Faye is based around a conversation between the narrator and Lola Faye, who was a central figure in the violent events of years ago that changed lives.
As the talk progresses, memories return, each one casting light on those events and on the character of the protagonist. And as the memories expand everything seems less obvious, more threatening, as Lola, with her apparently naive questions gradually brings out the truth.
The reader, however, never knows just what is going to happen and who is going to be revealed as guilty and why, until right at the end, when expectations are quite overturned.
Thomas H Cook doesn't go in for action-packed, thrill-a-page, "unputdownable" formulaic novels. His books are thoughtful and powerful and stick in the mind. Many of his best books are concerned with raising ghosts, with the truth of what has happened in the past and has been supressed gradually reasserting itself. Buried secrets are revealed, and with them the damage to present lives because of past crimes is illuminated and explained..
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Format: Hardcover
Poetic...dark...suspenseful...satisfying. For this reader each of these words aptly describe award winning author Thomas H. Cook's beautifully written novel THE LAST TALKWIHT LOLA FAYE. Reading it is a bit like watching an absorbing two person play as the story is revealed in a conversation between two characters - Lucas "Luke" Page and Lola Faye Gilroy.

Luke is a fair to middling professor and writer who has come to St. Louis to deliver a lecture at the Museum of the West. It's a dreary, wet December evening, and he doesn't anticipate much of a crowd - there seldom is at his lectures. However, the last person he expected or wanted to see was Lola Faye Gilroy, his father's mistress. Her husband had shot and killed his father, and then killed himself. All of this in Glenville, Alabama, a tired Southern town where his father ran a variety store.

Now, Glenville was not your pretty little town but a place pockmarked by abandoned storefronts "their empty windows staring like blinded eyes onto deserted sidewalks....and a windowless library housed in the basement of the police department." Plus "a trailer park perpetually pulsing in the light of a police cruiser, diesel trucks sitting like exhausted mastodons in red-dirt driveways." It was a place Luke couldn't wait to leave - of course, he would leave because he was considered to be "the smartest kid in town." As far as he was concerned Glenville limited his intellectual prowess; he believed that some day he would write a great novel. Yet here he was some years later addressing a sparse audience, and unable to turn Lola Faye down when she urged him to have a drink with her.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Just when I was congratulating myself that I no longer had anything to do with Kindle's Daily Deal I took a wee peek and saw that today's offering was the usual waffle-and-maple-syrup fare. Nice when you bite into it, but then you read the label more closely and see that it's only 10% real maple-syrup and the waffle mix had far too much bicarb in and you swear you're never going to eat one of those again.
What I didn't suspect was that the label to this packet had a little Alice Door in it. The book didn't interest me really. I could easily prove it by downloading the free sample just to prove how right I was. The sample arrived, remarkably quickly too considering it was Kindle PaperWhite with its 'free 3G' which is so grotty it's almost a Con.

Double Disguise
Imagine that you'd dressed for an evening out at The Theatre. You're going to see Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire and it's going to be your fourth time. You've selected your fondest, wistfullest, yeah bestest outfit in your wardrobe as you've heard it said that the new actress playing Blanche Dubois is Something Else. That's why you've gone to so much trouble trouble dressing.
When you get to the Stage you find you're right. Spot on..
Except that in this tale, Blanche isn't quite Blanche, is she? This lady who's described as drab, humdrum, shabby, a mere redneck girl, seems to have got a remarkably pointed mind, even if she gets it from the boring show Dragnet, or the magazine article she half read while waiting to see the doctor.
If Lola Faye backwater education makes her perception little more than a rusty blade, it's evident to me at least that one one of those hicks sure got the knack of brewing poky cider vinegar to use in knife sharpening.
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