Last Man in Tower and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Last Man in Tower has been added to your Basket
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Last Man in Tower Paperback – 1 Nov 2011


See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Nov 2011
£12.99
£2.49 £0.01
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Last Man in Tower + Between the Assassinations + The White Tiger
Price For All Three: £28.72

Some of these items are dispatched sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (1 Nov. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857896873
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857896872
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.1 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,018,374 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Aravind Adiga was born in Madras in 1974. He studied at Columbia and Oxford Universities. His first novel, The White Tiger, won the Man Booker Prize for 2008. A former Indian correspondent for Time magazine, his writing has also appeared in the New Yorker, the Financial Times, and the Sunday Times among other publications. He lives in Mumbai.

Product Description

Review

'I was absolutely mesmerized by this novel, and think that Aravind Adiga is already, with this, his second book, the most exciting novelist writing in English today.' - A. N. Wilson. 'Beautifully done... Last Man in Tower is as honest a book as it is entertaining: funny and engaging as he can be, Adiga never forgets the seriousness of his subject.' - The Times 'A funny yet deeply melancholic work, Last Man in Tower is a brilliant, and remarkably mature, second novel. A rare achievement.' - The Economist 'The story of a struggle for a slice of shining Mumbai real estate brings all of Adiga's gifts for sharp social observation and mordant wit to the fore... His scope, in this novel teeming with life and skulduggery, is Dickensian... [Adiga is] a writer who is evocative, entertaining and angry.' - Daily Telegraph

Review

"Extraordinary and brilliant... Adiga is a real writer – that is to say, someone who forges an original voice and vision." (The Sunday Times) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 72 people found the following review helpful By FictionFan TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 May 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Sometimes a book is so good it's hard to do justice to it in a review. This is one of those books.

As the Vakola area of Bombay (as the author usually calls it) begins to come up in the world, the inhabitants of an apartment block are offered money by a developer to move out. One man, Masterji, a retired teacher, wants to stay. This is the story of how the promise of wealth changes and corrupts a community. But it's also so much more than that. The author takes us into the lives of Masterji and his neighbours, letting us see their thoughts and dreams and fears. With humanity and humour he paints a picture of the friendships, favours and shared histories that bind a community together; and then shows how small envies and old grievances are magnified when that community is divided.

Bombay itself is a major character in the book. There is a real sense of how the city is changing as India becomes richer. The contrasts between the lucky rich and the frightening hand-to-mouth existence of the very poor are woven into the story, but subtly, so that the reader accepts these contrasts as easily as the inhabitants. The author also highlights the cosmopolitan nature of the city, the differing religions and cultures all forming one vibrant whole.

This book made me laugh and cry. It is full of warmth and the characters are drawn sympathetically and affectionately. In many ways an intimate portrait of a small group of people, but also an in-depth look at the strengths and frailties of human nature. By a long way, this is the best book I have read this year. Don't miss it!
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Valentine Gersbach on 23 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
I read "White Tiger" a while ago and remember being impressed even though I can't recall anything about it now.I doubt that I'll forget this engrossing novel very quickly.

The story is a simple one about how decent people can,given the right circumstances,do terrible things.Adiga's talent is to trace the descent into evil with meticulous care and observation.No one in this novel is without flaw,just as no one is totally without redemptive features.Even the central heroic character is marked with pomposity,vanity and self deception.All the characters are given the time and space to develop themselves,all are realised as personalities,not cyphers, because of the length of the novel and its concentration on one central theme.

Perhaps the true villain of the piece is the city of Mumbai,shown here as a mixture of aching poverty,slick wealth,glamour,greed,envy,stunning beauty and teeming humanity.Where you live here is what you are to the world.What you have is what matters about you.Destitution means living on the pavement and scrounging a living from the filth around you.Wealth means existing in glamorous otherworld made all the more sumptuous by its existing within sight of human misery.Maybe this explains the devastating impact that the prospect of wealth has on the characters in the novel or maybe we're all capable of inhumanity, given the right circumstances.Whichever way you look at it,this is a novel that transcends its time and setting even though Mumbai is vibrantly and fascinatingly a major player in it.

If I read another novel of this quality this year,I shall count myself lucky.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mavis Moog on 21 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
I read this book over a long time because of frequent interruptions - life is like that sometimes. However, I kept going back and eagerly picking up where I left off.

The story is beautifully crafted hardly ever loses momentum but often mesmerizes with rich passages of flashback, dream-sequence and internal visualisations of the protagonist, Masterji.

The characterisation is excellent, and even though I worried at the beginning that too many were introduced at once, I had absolutely no trouble keeping them apart.

The themes of this novel are not pleasant. It describes how long-term loyalties and family devotion can be casually corrupted by money and how our pasts form us as surely as if we were made from dough. But this is not a simple fable. The complexity of the story is carefully revealed so that no character is entirely right or wrong. All have reason and motive. Masterji's inertia is examined in all possible lights, from heroic rebellion to selfish conservatism. He is portrayed as devoted teacher and husband and also as repellent bully and mad-man. His pride and humility are tossed on a sea of revelations which are too painful to endure.

Excellent read. Can't wait to get on with Aravind Adiga's more famous novel The White Tiger, but I am worried because it has those fateful words on the jacket, "Million-copy bestseller," so often millions are wrong.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Marand TOP 100 REVIEWER on 29 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
'Last Man in Tower' continues with the themes Adiga pursued in his earlier book 'The White Tiger' - corruption, greed, injustice, the extremes of poverty and wealth, duplicity and moral degradation. This book is in many ways darker than 'The White Tiger' where the satire was frequently extremely funny.

I must admit that I struggled through the first 200 pages which describe in some detail the rich cast of characters who occupy a decaying Bombay tower block. Although I found the first half of the book slow going, without the descriptions of these ostensibly respectable, middle class people, the latter part of the book would be less powerful. That said, I can see why some people might give up reading part way through. The pace picks up when a developer offers the residents a substantial sum to move out so that he can build a luxury tower block to replace the existing run down edifice. From that point on I couldn't put the book down until I finished reading at 5am. The subtle and not so subtle pressures put upon the refuseniks are detailed. Eventually, only one man, Masterji, remains holding out against the developer - "Though the men and women around him dreamed of bigger homes and cars, his joys were those of expanding the square footage of his inner life".

None of the characters is without flaws, even the 'Last Man', but the moral bankruptcy of those who at the outset appear to be pillars of the community and yet who are ready to do almost anything in pursuit of money makes for riveting reading. On the other hand the developer is ostensibly the villain of the piece, yet his back story means that you don't see him in an entirely bad light, indeed for me he emerges more favourably than do some of Masterji's neighbours and friends.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback