Last Evenings On Earth and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Last Evenings On Earth has been added to your Basket
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Fun Meister
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A book which is in good overall condition. This means that it will be largely free of page markings, the spine will still be in solid, tight condition and there will be no pages which are missing from the book. The pages may have slightly turned corners but overall the book should be clean to touch and enjoyable to read.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Last Evenings On Earth Paperback – 3 Apr 2008

9 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£3.62 £3.83
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Last Evenings On Earth + 2666 + The Savage Detectives
Price For All Three: £26.11

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in Last Evenings On Earth for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (3 April 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099469421
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099469421
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,081 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Roberto Bolaño was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1953. He spent much of his adult life in Mexico and in Spain, where he died at the age of fifty. His novel The Savage Detectives was named as one of the ten best books of 2007 by the Washington Post and the New York Times Book Review. His posthumous masterpiece, 2666, won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Haunting, unsettling, evocative, Roberto Bolanã's Last Evenings on Earth is a remarkable book, and as the first of celebrated Chilean author's work to be translated into English (by Chris Andrews), it's the perfect introduction to the man who Susan Sontag called 'the most influential and admired novelist of his generation in the Spanish-speaking world'.

The protagonists have one thing in common in these stories: often on the fringes of society, they are engaged in difficult, challenging quests, their lives frequently on the line. And when they find what they are seeking, those lives are often changed irrevocably – and forever. The bleak undercurrent of life in Pinochet's regime is the background here, but the narratives of the stories contain a whole universe. In the title tale, the central character pursues – rather desperately – a hedonistic, erotically-charged lifestyle on a holiday in Acapulco. The pleasures of the flesh do not offer the relief he seeks, and he finds consolation in the work of a surrealist poet who died during the Nazi regime, possibly at his own hand. Many of the Bolanã's favourite themes are brilliantly worked out here, in prose that leaps off the page. The other stories glitter with same coruscating brilliance – and despite the recurrence of such dark themes as suicide – this is not at all depressing fare: in fact, reading Last Evenings on Earth is a positively life-enhancing experience.

There should be a warning on the jacket of the book, however, reading Roberto Bolanã has a curious side-effect: you will find yourself proselytising on his behalf to anyone who will listen (and to some who won't). Bolanã's writing is addictive – and it has that effect on the reader. --Barry Forshaw

Review

"The most influential and admired novelist of his generation in the Spanish-speaking world" (Susan Sontag)

"This may be the most haunting and mesmerising collection I have ever read" (Daily Telegraph)

"A book full of insight for writers and aficionados of South American literature and culture" (Scotland on Sunday)

"It is a shame that Bolaño has no more evenings on earth, his unique voice asserting the importance and exuberance of literature will be sorely missed" (Guardian)

"Bolaño's language, alert and always graceful, his way of constructing narratives that are simultaneously disconcerting, brilliant and infinitely immediate, is a form of resisting evil, adversity and mediocrity" (Le Monde)

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 April 2009
Format: Paperback
You are probably like me and came to reading the late Roberto Bolano through the fantastic The Savage Detectives (now in paperback). I hadn't read this book before until the local reading group had it down to read. Firstly, I must admit that once I had finished it I started it all over again, it is that good.

This book contains 14 short stories, which are all haunting in their own ways. Bolano seems to specialise in what can only be termed as the dispossessed. All the stories deal with people on the fringes of normal society. With stories like the first one, Sensini where two writers enter short story competitions to try to make some money Bolano has also provided us with tales that are semi-autobiographical. The Grub looks at how we see the same people day to day, for instance if you commute into work and stand next to the same person at the station; what would you find out about them if you struck up a friendship with them?

My two favourite tales are Anne Moore's Life in which our narrator tells us about Anne Moore from what he has heard from her; this tale and Mauricio 'The Eye' Silva are both absolutely mesmerising. The latter tale is about a photographer on assignment in India, which should only last a week or so. Silva instead spends about eighteen months in the country after he finds out about a religious sect where young boys are castrated, in the end leaving them only fit to become gay prostitutes. Silva helps two of these boys escape and starts up a life with them. Indeed this tale is reminiscent of Conrad and you could imagine him writing something like it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Chestnut worm on 22 Sept. 2008
Format: Paperback
One of those books, I suspect, which you either abandon in the first four pages, or add to your personal list of special books. Very different to the tradition of English story-writing, these accounts manage a strange mixture of distance and intimacy. The characters are often identified only by letters, 'A' or 'B', the narrator often seems a detatched observer, even when recounting their own past life, yet the details of events and emotions recounted draw one in and allow you to engage with and care about the characters. There is generally no plot twist at the end, in fact, often no very obvious plot at all, but I found this collection engaging, interesting and memorable. I'd recommend giving it a try to see if it works for you. I'm now going to try something else by Roberto Bolano.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 31 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
"A minor poet disappears without leaving a trace, hopelessly stranded in some town on the Mediterranean coast of France. There is no investigation. There is no corpse. By the time B turns to Daumal, night has fallen on the beach; he shuts the book & slowly makes his way back to the hotel."

The last evenings on earth, shouldn't make sense, it's a book about failure, not the usual fireworks & all guns blazing failure I've come to expect from Bolano's work (The savage detectives, 2666). No this is wretched, abject - from the Latin "abjectus" meaning, cast away, this is the flotsam & jetsam of Latin- America, exiled from their own past. Individuals washed up on the shores of Europe, some having escaped torture & violence under General Pinochet's regime, yet having not really escaped, still wearing the chains, still bearing the scars, still living haunted lives of utter anonymity. Bolano also writes about the writers, poets and artists that history forgot, the ones who regardless of talent, pursued a life of dedication to their muse, the ones who sacrificed themselves upon its altar & left not a blood stain.

"Have you found Henri Lefebvre? asks M. She must be still half asleep, thinks B. Then he says no. She has a pretty laugh. Why are you so interested in him? she asks, still laughing. Because nobody else is, says B. And because he was good."
These characters work as dishwashers, send poems to obscure magazines, enter competitions for a pittance of a prize, for the one chance that a light may illuminate their genius, that some voice will sing out & proclaim their worth. Lives are spent travelling from A to B, but B's never different, it's the same cheap hotel, the same bar filled with the same shades, just a different costume on the same whore .
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp on 3 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
What we know about the tremendous gifts of Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño (April 28, 1953 - July 15, 2003) is in many ways due to the excellent translations by Chris Andrews. Andrews began translating Bolaño into English before the word understood the importance of this much mourned novelist and poet. This particular work LAST EVENINGS ON EARTH is a series of short stories that are delivered in conversational style (the narrator is always in the first person), a technique that enhances the common line of dealing with exile - from country, from hopes, from dreams, from immortality - that is the common thread throughout these fourteen stories.

Though each of the stories is well written, capturing our attention and concern for each of the characters, each one of the stories seem to be insights into the man we now recognize as a master writer and political activist. For this reader the most disturbing story is 'Dance Card', a story in numbered sentences that closes the collection. Some background as described in Wikipedia: 'He was dyslexic, and was often bullied at school, where he felt an outsider. In 1968 he moved with his family to Mexico City, dropped out of school, worked as a journalist and became active in left-wing political causes. A key episode in Bolaño's life, mentioned in different forms in several of his works, occurred in 1973, when he left Mexico for Chile to "help build the revolution" by supporting the socialist regime of Salvador Allende. After Augusto Pinochet's coup against Allende, Bolaño was arrested on suspicion of being a terrorist and spent eight days in custody. He was rescued by two former classmates who had become prison guards.' Translate these realities into a short story format and the reader is treated to 'Dance Card'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback