Land of Lisp: Learn to Program in Lisp, One Game at a Time! and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£33.50
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Land of Lisp: Learn to Pr... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £9.83
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Land of Lisp: Learn to Program in Lisp, One Game at a Time! Paperback – 15 Nov 2010

9 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£33.50
£19.07 £20.33
£33.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

Land of Lisp: Learn to Program in Lisp, One Game at a Time! + The Little Schemer
Price For Both: £54.35

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 504 pages
  • Publisher: No Starch Press; 1 edition (15 Nov. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593272812
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593272814
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3.3 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 297,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Conrad Barski has an M.D. from the University of Miami, and nearly 20 years of programming experience. This includes a stint developing an obscure Atari Jaguar game, and working on many medical software projects. Barski is also an avid cartoonist, having created the popular alien Lisp mascot and many graphical tutorials. He currently develops cardiology software and lives in Washington, D.C.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John Smith on 9 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
Lisp is 50+ years old yet is still novel -- how cool is that?

I'm trying to learn Lisp, and have realised that I will be trying for the rest of my life. So I bought this book to see if it would help me in that quest. As has been said in another comment this book uses a care-free style to get its message across; it is filled with lots of cartoons. But it also has lots of code examples and data tables -- the loop periodic table is a very good example of the added value this book provides.

Like any programming language, it is not just the understanding of how to use it, but why to do things and when to do things. So, while Lisp has lots of ways to test for equality, which do you use? Well, Mr Barski answers that, and gives his reasons. Opinions such as this are invaluable.

Lisp is hard work -- well it is for me because I have to stop thinking as if I'm coding in Java and start to think in terms of Lisp. Yet the more I do this the more I find the Lisp way *very* refreshing. Macros -- how cool are they? All that crud you have to put up with in Java; just hide it in a macro. Cool! A ten-line function is often a big function, but I find it can do so much. And Lisp is a big language, hence my comment about learning for the rest of your life. I found the style to be very engaging, and the topics covered comprehensive. And every time I try to write in Lisp (which I now try to do for evey new project I start) Lisp gets easier.

Let's face it, there is only one way to learn Lisp and that is to code in it. If this book gives you some examples to help you start that can only be good.

I had this book on pre-order for quite some time. I am happy to tell you it was worth the wait.

Do I think you should buy it? You bet!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Schmuecker on 24 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a great book about LISP. It explains the core features and paradigms behind LISP while always keeping it light and entertaining. I find it does that even better than some of the more "serious" introductions to the LISP language such as The ANSI Common Lisp Book (Prentice Hall Series in Artificial Intelligence).

The fact that it contains a more complicated version of WUMPUS the first game I ever played on a computer and one of the reasons why I got into programming is just so much fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Miguel Arregui on 10 May 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book out of curiosity for the functional paradigm. I come from the world of Java and I find it tremendously valuable to invest some good time trying out other languages, paradigms and philosophies. That is why I had a look at Clojure, to realise that if I ever wanted to be a true functional developer I had to go to the root and learn LISP first. The gains of having an understanding of this programming language are obvious as it takes you out of your comfort zone and gently forces you to re-discover solutions to problems you have been faced with before but from an entirely new angle. The insight that comes from that makes you that much better in your comfort zone.

The book itself is one of the best books in my very extensive own personal library. It is a jewel of originality, well structured, with an accessible enough language for the new comer but not so accessible that the experienced programmer would get bored, with brilliant examples and great insight into the world of computer science and software development.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Briddock on 3 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback
Over the last few years there's been a strong resurgence in the functional programming paradigm. New languages such as Clojure and Scala, which synthesise functional features with a modern-looking syntax, have engendered enthusiastic communities. While JavaScript, CoffeeScript and TypeScript developers increasingly want to code in a functional style.


Understanding key functional concepts is widely considered to be an essential part of a software programmer's skill set. One which invariably results in higher levels of proficiency with other languages.



However, anyone who has tried their hand at functional programming knows it necessitates a different way of thinking. This mindset shift invariably takes some time to accomplish. Many give up before the proverbial light bulb is illuminated.

What would help is an engaging and entertaining introduction to functional programming. Land of Lisp aims to provide just such a solution.

It's a comprehensive 500 page guide which covers the full breadth of functional programming topics, from using simple lists to defining your own macros. Throughout exercises and code examples are practical in nature, with an underlying gaming theme.

The author's informal style, combined with a fluid pace, well structured content and those wacky-yet-informative illustrations, are a breath of fresh air in the often insular world of functional programming.

Although the book's content and code listings are based around CLISP (an ANSI Common Lisp implementation), the lessons learned can be applied to other Lisp dialects, or languages that support a functional style of coding.


The question is whether this book succeeds in easing the path to functional programming mastery? I think it does.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback