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Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China Paperback – 2 Jun 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Original edition (2 Jun. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439136866
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439136867
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.3 x 21.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,578,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Product Description

Review

A modern Chinese version of Dr Zhivago told from the point of view of a Chinese Lara -- Peter Gordon, The Asian Review of Books

Fascinating and important...her past made her the interesting and truthful person she is. -- Literary Review, July, 2003

Frank by the standards of any memoir. -- South China Morning Post, August, 2003

Of love and despair...a personal account of a dark time in modern Chinese history. -- Sunday Telegraph (Australia), July, 2003

This sweeping book is the account of the momentous uprising in Tiananmem Square...graphic and harrowing but uplifting too. -- Marie-Claire, July 2003 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Diane Wei Liang was born in Beijing. In 1989, she took part in the Student Democracy movement and protested in Tiananmen Square. Liang is a graduate of Peking university and holds a Ph.D. in business administration from Carnegie Mellon university. She now writes full-time and lives in London with her husband and their two children.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "kate_mallone" on 8 July 2003
Format: Paperback
Liang grew up in China during the repressive Cultural Revolution and spent years in a labour camp when her parents were exiled from the city. Her childhood experience helps to explain her utmost desire for truth and freedom. Lake With No Name tells a story of a young woman’s journey of love and loss, when her country was embroiled in the biggest political conflict of its modern history. Liang writes with deep emotions and honesty about herself, her lovers and fellow students who risked their lives in Tiananmen Square. Lake With No Name is a beautiful, though at times, harrowing tale of life and love.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "tcsrlondon" on 7 Jun. 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a remarkable book by first time author Diane Wei Liang recounting her amazing journey through the tumultuous and changing China of the latter part of last century. Well written and paced it provides fantastic insight of life in China from a labour camp to the Tiananmen demonstration that was brutally repressed and beyond. Anyone interested in the personal side of real people living wihtin a totalitarian system trying to find their lives and love through historic events will be thrilled they read this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Jun. 2003
Format: Paperback
I am surprised that it has taken so long for someone to write about the Tiananmen Massacre of 1989. But I am glad that it is Diane Wei Liang who finally does it. In this moving memoir, she writes a heartbreaking love story, set against the background of those dramatic days of student uprising, bloodshed and killings. Lake With No Name is a testimony of the enduring power of life, hope and love.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gary Selikow on 15 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
A window in the brutal totalitarian world of Communist China which continues to this day. It is both a autobiography of a sensitivities, intelligent women and her experiences growing up and being a student in Communist China.
Wei Liang grew up in a labour camp that her parents were sent to during the horrors of The Cultural Revolution. she became a student at the prestigious Beijing University-the elite equivalent of Harvard and Yale in the USA or Oxford and Cambridge in Britain. There she became a keen reader of classic literature and a writer of poetry. There she also formed a deep romance with Dong Yi, a star crossed love that could not be.
It was also at Beijing University where she joined many other students in the struggle for freedom, democracy, human rights and a better life, which have not improved in China, despite its move to a capitalist economic system.
The rights the student demanded where nothing more than the basic freedoms everyone in western democracies take for granted.
The narrative moves painstakingly and slowly towards the horrific Tienanmen square massacre of June, 1989, when three thousand students, workers and others were murdered in a bloody crackdown in response to a peaceful protest for basic freedoms-an even all but brushed aside today by the western left, media and academia.
The author describes the pain and terror of these events , in which the youngest victim was a nine year old girl and the oldest a grandmother in her 70s. After the massacre the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army for weeks patrolled the streets of Beijing gunning down in cold blood students and other citizens.
After the massacre, Wei would soon leave China but would return for a time seven years later, to seek out Dong Yi. The author finishes the account by telling us where the main players in the real life drama=her friends and associates are today.
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Format: Paperback
One of the best China books, full of raw emotions and honesty! In this powerful memoir, Wei Liang writes with vivid imagery and poise two parallel stories: on one hand, a gripping eyewitness account of the dramatic events leading up to the Tiananmen Square Massacre, and on the other hand, a passionate and tragic love affair between the author and Dong Yi, a student leader. Wei Liang narrates with such a personal presence that you feel that you are with her in the labour camp, on top of the tank, inside Tiananmen Square and at Weiming Lake - the Lake With No Name bidding Dong Yi the last goodbye. You feel what she felt and share her hopes and dreams. In fact, despite the horrific ending that came on June 04 1989, "Lake With No Name" is ultimately a book about hope and courage of chasing one's dreams. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
In view of the context of this account one wouldn't expect enjoyment as such. However the writer has moved in an interesting circle of colleagues and friends and one is easily drawn in to discover their fate. There are more loose strands than would appear in a work of fiction but one is held by the unfamiliarity of the social context and curiosity about the apparently bizarre way of running a regime. The style is conversational and well suited to the genre. The political aspect isn't allowed to interfere with the flow of the narrative.
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