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Lake Of Dracula [VHS]


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Product details

  • Actors: Midori Fujita, Chôei Takahashi, Sanae Emi, Shin Kishida, Tadao Futami
  • Directors: Michio Yamamoto
  • Writers: Ei Ogawa, Masaru Takesue
  • Producers: Fumio Tanaka
  • Language: Japanese
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warrior
  • VHS Release Date: 5 Aug. 2002
  • Run Time: 82 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00006BT7R
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 205,432 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Japanese period vampire horror starring Midori Fujita as Akiko, a woman who, as a five-year-old girl, witnesses a golden-eyed vampire committing a grisly murder in an abandoned old house. Although at the time Akiko is narrowly rescued from the vampire's fangs, the ordeal continues to haunt her as she grows into womanhood. The ordeal is explained away by those around her as a nightmare. But with the delivery to Akiko's village of a mysterious package, her terror is about to recommence...

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Cameron on 19 Aug. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I had my doubts about this film after reading several negative reviews on LoveFilm, but I love classic Vampire films and thought I'd give it ago anyway - what I found was a surprisingly enjoyable take on the classic Dracula Formula.

Set in Japan (in fact the whole production is Japanese) Dracula has come to a lakeside retreat and in classic hammer horror style starts to kill of or convert the various characters - I won't spoil anymore of the story although it is predictable stuff.

The DVD presents the film in is full 2.35:1 letterbox format and with the original Japanese soundtrack and nice clear subtitles. My only complaint is that the film obviously hasn't been treated well over the years and the picture quality does suffer making it look like a well used VHS transfer.

All in all, there is nothing bad about the movie at all, it's an easy-going viewing experience that is a good way to kill 90 minutes if your bored. Well worth a rent if nothing else.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Aug. 2004
Format: DVD
You won't find a lot of Japanese vampire films, but that doesn't mean the Japanese didn't know how to make such a movie work. The Lake of Dracula is the second of three vampire films directed by Michio Yamamoto to be released by Toho (of Godzilla fame) in the early 1970s. Lest you start wondering how Dracula could have suddenly become Japanese, let me say that this particular title was given to the film by marketers hoping to attract the attention of American audiences: its more proper titles include The Bloodthirsty Eyes and Lake of Death (it was also given the outrageous title of Japula for a very short time). Like Legacy of Dracula before it and Evil of Dracula after it, this film was made in the Hammer style, a fact which makes it all the more interesting to me.
The film opens with a little girl chasing her exceedingly adorable dog into a creepy old house, where she experiences a terrifying encounter with its occupants. We then fast forward eighteen years into the future, where the young girl, Akiko, is now a schoolteacher living with her sister along the shores of the beautiful Lake Fujimi. Akiko's childhood "nightmare" has always tormented her, to the point that she often paints scenes of a creepy, surrealistic eye brooding over dark landscapes. Still, she is happy - until a certain mystery crate is delivered to one of her neighbors. Mysterious deaths begin occurring in the area, leaving dead bodies bereft of blood and with necks punctured in the tell-tale style, and some of Akiko's friends begin acting very strangely. About this same time, a mysterious stranger also arrives in town and seems intent on getting to know Akiko.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mark W. T. A. on 22 Feb. 2003
Format: DVD
Rarely seen by Western audiences, this transposition of a Euro-style vampire tale to modern (1970s) Japan is creepy and effective. A schoolteacher and her younger sister live by the edge of an eerie lake, some distance away from the city. Traumatized by a nightmare she had when she was five, the teacher is haunted by the memory of a strange man with staring, golden eyes. When the caretaker takes delivery of a crate containing an ornate coffin, she comes to realise that her frightening recollections may not be the result of a bad dream after all...
Although it uses mainly traditional vampire elements, "Lake of Dracula" has a fresh, otherwoldly quality that helps make it a compelling piece of cinema. Featuring a truly menacing vampire, it's the perfect antidote to rubbish like the "Blade" series and "Razorblade Smile" etc. Highly recommended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A wonderfully atmospheric Hammer-style Japanese vampire film 9 Aug. 2004
By Daniel Jolley - Published on Amazon.com
You won't find a lot of Japanese vampire films, but that doesn't mean the Japanese didn't know how to make such a movie work. The Lake of Dracula is the second of three vampire films directed by Michio Yamamoto to be released by Toho (of Godzilla fame) in the early 1970s. Lest you start wondering how Dracula could have suddenly become Japanese, let me say that this particular title was given to the film by marketers hoping to attract the attention of American audiences: its more proper titles include The Bloodthirsty Eyes and Lake of Death (it was also given the outrageous title of Japula for a very short time). Like Legacy of Dracula before it and Evil of Dracula after it, this film was made in the Hammer style, a fact which makes it all the more interesting to me.

The film opens with a little girl chasing her exceedingly adorable dog into a creepy old house, where she experiences a terrifying encounter with its occupants. We then fast forward eighteen years into the future, where the young girl, Akiko, is now a schoolteacher living with her sister along the shores of the beautiful Lake Fujimi. Akiko's childhood "nightmare" has always tormented her, to the point that she often paints scenes of a creepy, surrealistic eye brooding over dark landscapes. Still, she is happy - until a certain mystery crate is delivered to one of her neighbors. Mysterious deaths begin occurring in the area, leaving dead bodies bereft of blood and with necks punctured in the tell-tale style, and some of Akiko's friends begin acting very strangely. About this same time, a mysterious stranger also arrives in town and seems intent on getting to know Akiko. As our heroine begins encountering strange situations and finds herself attacked, she begins to fear she is crazy - even her sister begins acting very strangely. Akiko's fiance, a doctor named Saeki, sees enough evidence of his own to start believing Akiko's word about what she has seen, and the two work their way toward the only logical conclusion as to what is going on. Saeki believes the key to escaping the clutches of evil is to be found inside Akiko's head, specifically in her repressed memory as to what happened all those years ago when she was a child.

There's nothing at all graphic about the scenes of vampirism here, nor does the film boast any terror-inducing moments, but it does possess a nice edge of creepiness that ebbs and flows most effectively throughout the course of the entire film. The ending is a little weird but effective; the fact that our heroes walk into danger without the first hint of protection against vampires means a Van Helsing type sendoff of the bad guy is not in the cards. The explanation of the vampire and his whereabouts is rather interesting and definitely occupies its own little branch of the tree of vampire lore; as critics have pointed out, the vampire here is essentially a foreign invader of Japan and not a vampire born under the banner of the Rising Sun itself.

The acting is impressive all the way around. Midori Fujita is wonderful in the role of the sanity-doubting, constantly frightened heroine Akiko, Sanae Emi lends great strength and an important element of uncertainty to the film in her role as Akiko's sister Natsuko, and Shin Kishida makes for a most menacing Japanese vampire. The atmosphere of the film is quite effective, building in creepiness as the film progresses. If you like your vampire killing quick, fast, and messy, you may grow impatient with The Lake of Dracula, but those who love a more methodical, personal approach to the genre stand a very good chance of enjoying this film a great deal. There are really only three of these Hammer-inspired Japanese vampire movies; having seen Lake of Dracula and the later Evil of Dracula, I can honestly say that I believe horror buffs will be pleasantly surprised by the caliber (and creepiness) of these films.
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